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STUDIES AND DOCUMENTS 


EDITED BY 

KIRSOPP LAKE, LITT. D. 

AND 

SILVA LAKE, M. A. 


II " 

EPIPHANIUS DE GEMMIS 

BY 

ROBERT P. BLAKE, PH. D. 

AND 

HENRI DE VIS 


CHRISTOPHERS 
1934 


STUDIES AND DC 

EDITED BY 

KIRSOPP LAKE, LITT. D. AND S 


II 

EPIPHANIUS DE 


D DOCUMENTS 

!D BY 

D. AND SILVA LAKE, M. A. 


II 

3 DE GEMMIS 


ADVISORY COMMITTEE 


R. P. BLAKE 

CAMPBELL BONNER 

F. C. BURKITT 

H. J. CADBURY 

R. P. CASEY 

HENRI DE -VIS 

BELLE DA C. GREENE 

H. A. SANDERS 



EPIPHANIU&DE GEMMIS 


K ^ 

The Old Georgian Version and tne 
Fragments of tne Armenian V ersion 

BY 

ROBERT P. BLAKE, PH. D. 



AND 

Tne CoptioSanidic Fragments 

BY 

HENRI DE VIS 


LONDON: CHRISTOPHERS 

22 BERNERS STREET, W. 1 

CAPfi TOWN MELBOURNE SYDNEY WELLINGTON TORONTO 



FIRST PUBLISHED IN 1934 



PRINTED IN BELGIUM 
BY THE IMPRIMERIE DE MEESTER, WETTEREN. 


1154987 



TO 

NIKOLAI YAKOVLEVICH MARK 

FROM HIS GRATEFUL PUPIL. 


PREFACE. 


In the present volume is printed for the first time an al- 
most complete text of the last learned production of that 
widely-read but inaccurate luminary of the church,Epiphanius 
of Salamis ; for the Latin version of the treatise on the Twelve 
Precious Stones, from which knowledge of it has hitherto been 
derived, contains barely one half of the original document. 
Not only is the tractate intrinsically valuable as a work of 
patristic' literature, but the Georgian translation is important 
for Georgian philology, as constituting one of the earliest 
and most valuable extant monuments of that language. 
Either consideration would justify its publication. 

The text was copied by me from the manuscript at Tiflis 
in the winter of 1919, and afterwards recollated with the 
original. During the preparation of the edition I sought to 
have some passages compared once more with the manu- 
script, but this proved to be impossible. 

As to the form in which the text appears in print, some 
explanation is desirable. The complete absence of Georgian 
type in this country at the time of printing made it advisable 
to lithograph the main body of the text. A set of Georgian 
type-blanks was accordingly cut and fitted to a typewriter ; 
the pages were then typed in lithographic ink, and so trans- 
ferred to the stone. 

In overcoming the technical difficulties involved in these 
processes, I received much help and practical advice from 
firms and persons to whom I addressed myself. My particul- 
ar thanks are due to the staff in the Boston office of the L. C. 
Smith and Brothers Typewriter Company, to the New York 
Stencil Company, and especially to Mr. C. A. White of the 
Whitesmith Music Press Company of Boston and to Messrs. 


IV 

G. Ayen and J. Roland of the press-room of the last mentioned 
company and to their subordinates. The friendly and help- 
ful interest which they took in my laborious task made the 
long hours spent in cleaning the stones a pleasure at the time 
and a pleasant memory in retrospect. The remainder of the 
book was printed at Wetteren in Belgium at the Imprimerie 
Polyglotte of M. Jules De Meester, to whose patience and 
ingenuity I am much indebted. 

A work of this sort cannot be brought to completion with- 
out aid from many persons and sources. In this connection 
I particularly desire to express my heartfelt gratitude to my 
friend Pere Paul Peeters, S. J., the learned Bollandist. Pere 
Peeters kindly arranged to have the Coptic texts translated 
by his friend Abbe H. De Vis of Brussels, a most competent 
Coptic scholar, and himself revised and checked the results. 
This was essential to me, as a knowledge of Coptic is not in- 
cluded in my own philological equipment. Pere Peeters put 
me on the track of much of the Armenian material, and in 
addition read through my translations from the Armenian ; 
in doing so he smoothed away many roughnesses and expung- 
ed not a few errors. To both my learned friends I would 
here express my very sincere gratitude for the care, labor, 
and attention that they both lavished on this book. M.l'Abbe 
L. St. Paul Girard, the secretary and librarian of the Iristi- 
tut frangais d'archeologie orientale at Cairo, most unselfishly 
communicated the five leaves of the Coptic text which had 
remained completely unknown to us and contributed his 
observations on the text. To him also most grateful thanks 
are due. In like manner I am deeply indebted to my friends 
Shalva Amiranashvili and Grigol T'ut'beridze, former stud- 
ents of the historical-philosophical faculty of the Georgian 
State University at Tiflis, who aided me in recollating my 
transcript of the text with the original codex. Father J. B. 
Aucher of the Mkhit'arist Congregation of San Lazzaro in 
Venice identified for me the Armenian epitomes preserved 
in the library of San Lazzaro, and permitted me to make co- 
pies of them. At Jerusalem His Beatitude the Armenian 
Patriarch (now deceased) kindly allowed me to investigate 
the treasures of the Armenian MSS. of the Convent of St. 
James, and the librarian, Father (now Bishop) Mesrop, 


and Vardapet Kiuregh Israelean made it possible for me to 
ferret out the fragments of Epiphanius contained therein. Var- 
dapet Kiuregh also kindly copied out for me part of these. To 
them likewise I wish to acknowledge my sincere gratitude. 

To my colleagues, Professors G. F. Moore, J. H. Ropes 
(both of whom died before the volume was published), 
and K. Lake of Harvard University, I am more deeply 
indebted than I can express for kindly criticism and help. 

It was originally intended to publish this book in the 
Harvard Theological Studies, but when that series was temp- 
orarily discontinued, it proved possible to include it in 
Studies and Documents. The funds for the publication of the 
book were given by my mother, Harriet W^ Blake, during 
her lifetime. In addition to all these scholars, I am supremely 
grateful to my teacher, Professor Nikolai Yakovlevich Man* 
of the Academy of Sciences of Leningrad, to whom I owe 
my initiation into the labyrinth of things Caucasian. I have 
keenly felt it as a disadvantage that I could not have the 
aid of his vast knowledge and incisive mind during the pre- 
paration of this volume ; many of my difficulties would have 
been solved by his wisdom and the roughnesses in my work 
pruned away by his experienced hand. I take the liberty 
of dedicating the book to him in witness that the seeds he has 
scattered so liberally have here once more found grateful 
soil. 

In conclusion I must also thank my wife for her efficient 
and sympathetic aid in countless minor details, and for the 
inspiration which she has continually afforded me. 


ROBERT P. BLAKE. 


Harvard University, 
Cambridge, Mass., 17. S. A. 


TABLE OF CONTENTS. 


Preface n .i 

Table of Contents . . . . ... vii 

Epiphanius. 

1. His Life. ix 

2. His Work. . x 

3. His Writings xi 

a) Ankyrotos xi 

b) Panarion. xi 

c) Anakephalaiosis. xn 

d) De mensuris et ponderibus. . xn 

e) Spuria. .' . . . xn 

The Tractate de duodecim gemmis 

4. The Date of Composition ; Jerome's Testimony. . xni 

5. The Title. xm 

6. The Greek Text xiv 

a) Epitome 1 . xiv 

b) Anastasius Sinaita, Procopius of Gaza and 

Epitome 2 xiv 

The Versions other than Georgian. 

7. a) The Latin . xxvi 

b) L and the Letter of Facundus Hermianensis. xxvn 

8. The Syriac xxix 

9. The Coptic Fragments. . . . .,. . . . . . xxx 

10. The Armenian Epitomes and Fragments XL 

The Georgian Text 

11. The Textual Tradition. L 

12. The Shatberd Manuscript ; Description .... L 

13. Date LI 

14. Later History of the Manuscript . LI 

15. Description of the Manuscript LII 

16. Contents of the Manuscript . LIII 

. 17. The Condition of the Text . ........ LV 

18. Other MSS of the Tractate. LV 

19. Djanashvili's Edition of the Text. . , , , , LVI 


VIII 

20. The Origin of the Georgian Translation. . . . LX 
21. The Evidence of the Other Works in the Manu- 
script . LX 

22. Armenian Loan Words in the Text LXI 

23. Greek Loan Words in the Text . LXX 

24. Traces of Armenian Idiom in the Translation . LXXIII 
25. The Origin of the Armenian Version which underlies 
the Georgian Archetype ; Traces of a Syriac 
Version . . LXXV 

The Georgian Translation 

26. Its General Character LXXVIII 

27. Grammatical Observations LXXIX 

a) Orthography . . . . . . . . <. . . . LXXIX 

b) Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LXXXIV 

28. Dialectal Peculiarities LXXXIV 

29. Technique of the Translation : its probable Date LXXXIV 
30. Localization of the Translation . . . . . . LXXXV 

31. The Content of the various Versions and their Re- 
lation to one another. . . . . . . . . LXXXVI 

The Sources used by Epiphanius for the Tractate and his Lit- 
erary Aims 

32. Ancient Literature on Gems xc 

33. Epiphanius' Sources apart from Mineralogical Li- 
terature. ....... xcvn 

34. Biblical Quotations in Epiphanius c 

35. Notes on Old Testament Quotations. ..... cxi 

36. The Purpose of the Work. . cxiv 

37. The Influence of the Tractate. ...... cxvi 

38. The Plan of the present Edition. . . . . . . cxvn 

39. Conclusions . cxx 

Texts and Translations 

1) The Georgian Text 1-96 

2) The English Translation of the Georgian . 101-196 

3) The Armenian Fragments and Translation. 197-235 

4) The Coptic Fragments and Translation. . 236-335 

5) Index of Personal and Place Names 5-0 

6) Index notabiliorum verborum. ...... 06-6 

7) Errata et corrigenda, ' , , , , , , , , 6-65 


THE LIFE AND WRITINGS OF EPIPHANIUS, 


1. His LIFE 

Epiphanius, bishop of Salamis in Cyprus, sole rival in 
erudition of Eusebius of Caesarea among the Oriental Christ- 
ians of the fourth century, was born near Eleutheropolis in 
Palestine of well-to-do and pious Christian parents during 
the second decade of the fourth century after Christ. (1) 
He seems;to have begun his studies at an early age, and after 
some journeys undertaken for the purpose of prosecuting his 
investigations, he returned to his native district, and became 
a monk in a cloister near Eleutheropolis. He was ordained 
presbyter and served as an archimandrite for many years, 
until in 367 he was made bishop of Salamis in Cyprus. He 
here enjoyed such a reputation for learning and piety 
that the arianizing emperor Valens did not dare to touch him. 
The last ten years of his life were troubled by the controver- 
sies over the orthodoxy of Origen which broke out in the 
year 394 between himself and the bishop of Jerusalem, Johan- 
nes. Into this conflict were drawn successively Jerome and 
Rufinus, and ultimately the Alexandrian patriarch Theophilus 
and John Chrysostom. Epiphanius subsequently realized that 
he had been made the catspaw of the wily Egyptian in the 
latter's intrigues against Chrysostom, and left Constantin- 
ople before John was driven into exile, but ere he arrived in 
Cyprus, death overtook him at sea (A. D. 403). 

Epiphanius' asceticism, zeal for orthodoxy, and enormous 


(1) The literature on the life and works of Epiphanius is very 
fully presented by O.BARDENHEWEH,Gesc/zic/ite der altkirchlichen Lit- 
eratur III (Miinchen, 1912), pp. 293 ff. The only studies of serious 
importance which have appeared in recent years are K. ROLL'S 
'Die handschriftliche Ueberlieferung des Epiphanius' Panarion 
(Texte und Untersuchungen,1910), and his edition of the Ancoratus 
and the Panarion in the Berlin Series (Bd. I ; 1915 ; II, 1922 ; 
111,1-2,1931-1933). 


x EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

range of knowledge, together with his unquestioned persona! 
honesty,combinedto impress his contemporaries as has been the 
case with few men. Jerome, no sluggard himself when it came 
to learning languages, deeply and profoundly admired the papa 
fte?T<yAa>TTo(l). With Greek as his mother-tongue, he had 
a working knowledge of Syriac, Hebrew, Coptic, and Latin. 
As a native of Palestine, he naturally had a good foundation 
for the, Semitic languages, while his 'Egyptian' must have 
been picked up during his earlier years in his visits to Egypt. 
Fie was uncommonly widely read in the most diverse fields, 
but the knowledge that he gained remained for him a rudis 
indigestaque moles. Credulous and uncritical, he piles the 
Pelion of fiction upon the Ossa of fact, giving far too little 
attention the while to the finish and literary form of his work. 
Asa result not only is his style strongly tinged with the vulgar 
idiom (2), but his sentences are complicated, obscure, and 
ponderous, while the thought often takes leaps, Pindaric 
in suddenness, but in naught else. Photios, that fastidious 
purist, does not mince matters in expressing his disapproving 
judgment (3). In many ways Epiphanius' nature reminds us 
of his friend Jerome, whom he successfully rivalled in his 
stored-up knowledge, but Epiphanius is wholly lacking in the 
admirable literary talent of the Stridonite. 

2. His WORK 

For us at the present day Epiphanius' work is most import- 
ant as a repository of valuable information on a multitude of 
matters, for a large part of which he form's our sole source (4). 
The value of his 'statements, however, is materially dimin- 
ished by his extraordinary inaccuracy, which makes it neces- 

1) Jerome c. Rufinum II, 22 ; III, 6. 

(2) See HOLL, Die handschriftliche Ueberlieferung, p. 98 ; Berlin 
edition, Bd.I, Vorwort, who rightly protests against the exaggerated 
condemnation commonly passed by scholars on Epiphanius' stylistic 
abilities. 

(3) Bibliotheca cod. 122 : rfjv d <pQdaiv ransiv6g rs teal ola. elx6s 'Ar- 
n>efjg naidel.a<; apsX&Trirov Tvy%dvii<>. 

(4) See especially R. A. LIPSIUS, Zur Quellenkritik des Epipha- 
nies, Wien 1865. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xi 

sary to use the greatest caution and, wherever possible, to 
test every statement he makes before relying upon it. 


3. His WRITINGS 

The authentic works of Epiphanius are four in number, 
all dating from the later period of his life. 

a) The, Ancoratus ('AyKVQcorfa), written in the year 374 in 
response to the request of certain friends at Suedra in Pamphy- 
lia, a compendium of ecclesiastical dogma centering round the 
Trinitarian problem, but touching as well on most of the other 
chief doctrinal issues. It is full of incidental polemic against 
the heretics (1). 

6) The Medicine Chest (UavdQiov or Adversus haereses) (2) 
was adirect outcome of the publication of the Ancoratus. Two 
of Epiphanius' friends, Akakios and Paulos, demanded fur- 
ther information from him regarding the eighty heresies men- 
tioned in the earlier work. He responded with a gigantic 
compilation which fills two stout volumes of Migne, and was 
completed in the year 377. The discussion of erroneous 
doctrines is followed v by a short sketch of the orthodox faith. 
For the older heresiarchs he draws his material for the most 

.<s 

part fromllrenaeus and Hippolytus : for the later ones he 
has a mass of information derived Jfrom multifarious written 
sources as well as from his own personal knowledge and ex- 
perience (3). At a very early date this undigested compil- 
ation was reduced to an outline by an unknown hand. This 
outline was put into circulation under the title of the 3 A- 
(4), which Augustine already cites (ca. 


(1) BARDENHEWER, 1. c., pp. 296-297. Text ed. HOLL, 1. 1-149 = 
MIGNE, PG., vol. 43, cols. 17-236. 

(2) BARDENHEWER, 1. c., pp. 297-99. Text ed. DINDORF, vol. I-III 
= MIGNE, PG., vol. 41-42 ; modern critical edition by K. HOLL (cf. 
note 1 above on p. ix). 

I. (3) See LIPSIUS, 1. c., p. 244. 

(4) BARDENHEWER, 1. c., pp. 299 ; Text ed. DINDORF, vol. I, pp. 
227-262 = MIGNE, P.G., vol. 42, cols. 833-886, 


xit EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

, 

428) (1) as though it were the work of Epiphanius himself. 
Being more handy and understandable than the unabridged 
Panarion, it was more widely read in ancient times. 


c) His next work, entitled negl ^TQCOV %at araBfi&v (de 
mensuris et ponderibus), written in Constantinople in 392 
at the request of a Persian priest, deals with biblical archaeo- 
logy (2). It purports merely to be a discussion of the weights 
and measures mentioned in the Bible, but in fact includes 
far more than this. In the first part the author discusses 
the history of the biblical canon ; in the second, the weights 
and measures employed in the Scriptures, while the third 
section treats of the biblical place-names. Bardenhewer rightly 
terms it a series of sketches and preliminary studies ; of 
the Greek original only scanty extracts have come down to 
us, but the whole is preserved inaSyriac version. This was 
edited by Paul de Lagarde (3), who retranslated into German 
parts furnished by the Syriac alone and so was able to 
publish a partly reconstructed edition of the complete work (4) . 

d) A series of exegetical works (5) and a number of homilies 
are also ascribed to Epiphanius in the manuscripts, but their 
authenticity is more than doubtful (6). 

e) One other document which we possess from Epiphanius' 
pen (presumably his latest production) is the tractate on the 
Twelve Stones (ns$i r&v d&d&xa MBwv), which forms the sub- 
ject of the present study. 

(1) AUGUSTINE, De haeresibus: Praefatio ; c. 57. (MIGNE, PL., 
vol. 42, 23 ; 42, 40). 

(2) BARDENHEWER, 1. c., pp. 299-300. 

(3) Gottingen 1880. 

(4) P. DE LAGARDE, Symmicta II (Gottingen, 1880), pp. 149-216. 

(5) BARDENHEWER, 1. c., pp. 301-02 ; a Georgian version of a 
commentary on the Psalms ascribed to Epiphanius is preserved in 
the same MS. which contains the tractate on theTwelve Stones ; see 
below, 12. 

(6) List in BARDENHEWER, I.e., p. 301 ; these productions, in spite 
of their mediocre literary quality, seem to have been very popu- 
lar, to judge from their frequent occurrence in both Greek and Geor- 
gian MSS. 


THE TRACTATE DE DUODECIM GEMMIS. 


4. THE DATE OF ITS COMPOSITION. 

We can date the work with reasonable surety, thanks to 
the testimony of Jerome. He states in one passage (1) that 
Epiphanius had himself given him a copy of the work, and 
cites a considerable passage from it in his own commentary 
on Isaiah (2). We know that Epiphanius came to Jerusalem in 
the year 394 (3), and the presumption is that the document 
had been written very shortly before that date. As it now 
stands, the text contains no apparent reference to the Ori- 
genistic controversies. 

5. THE TITLE OF THE TRACTATE. 

This varies somewhat in the different versions. The evi- 
dence of the Greek epitome (Ep 1 ) and the Georgian seems 
to show that the original form was 'Enupavtov emaxo- 
nov KtinQov MQOQ Aiodcogov enianonov TVQOV neql TOJV if}' Mdcov 
ev rolg aroha^oiQ rov 'Aagcbv fttfifaov. Jerome (4), however, 
and the Latin text make it appear that an abbrevia- 
ted title nsQi Mdcov (de gemmis) was in circulation. The 
Georgian also gives in the margin the same title as the La- 
tin : t'aalt'a t'iis ' concerning the gems' (5). But Anastasius 


(1) Hieronymtis, Comm. in Ezech. 1. 0. ad 28. 11 sq<j. (PL. 25, 
col. 271 G)...et vir sanctus Epiphanius episcopus proprium volumen 
mihi praesens tradidit. Jerome also mentions the work in Epist. 
64.21 (ad Fabiolam) (ed. Hilberg CSEL (1910), pp. 612.18-613.3), 
and Comm. in Isaiam, 1. 15 ad 54 . 11 ff (PL. 24. col. 523 G-D). 

(2) Hieronymus, Comm. in Isaiam, 1. 15 ad 54. 11 ff. (PL. 24. 525 
A-B.) This passage is cited below (p. xxxn). 

(3) BARDENHEWER, 1. c., in, pp. 293-4. 

(4) Hieronymus, Comm. in Isaiam, I.e. (PL. 23. 523 A), volumen, 
quod inscripsit negl UQmv. 

(5) On the special sense of this word see below, 24. 


xiv EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

Sinaita and Facundus Hermianensis refer to it as ytQd 

QOV. I have gone on the presumption that the title in the 

Greek epitome is correct. 

6. THE GREEK TEXT. 

With the exception of some scanty fragments, the Greek 
text of the document has been lost. What survives comprises 
two parallel epitomes of the section devoted to the descrip- 
tion of the stones, which we shall term in the discussion below 
Ep 1 and Ep a for convenience in citation, and two other 
fragments. 

a) The first epitome (by an anonymous abbreviator) makes 
some pretence to fullness. A comparison of it with the other 
versions shows that most of the facts were included by the epi- 
tomator, who confined himself to omitting certain statements 
and cutting down some of the sentences, without subjec- 
ting the text to a stylistic recension. The work is found in a 
number of MSS., and further investigation into them would 
presumably result in an improved text (I). It was first pub- 
lished by Conrad Gesner in 1585 and has been repeated with 
slight alteration in the succeeding editions, being last reprint- 
ed from Dindorf's text by F. de Mely and Ch. E. Ruelle (2). 
Any speculations as to date, place, or author are doomed to 
be futile in view of the complete absence of all data. 

b) The second epitome has come down to us in the work 
of Anastasius Sinaita entitled 'EQCOTtfaeis ncd anoxQiasig HSQI 
dicupoQcov KBfpakaiwv e% dicupoQCDV nQoffchncov, and is also found 
separately in MSS. This document was published from a 
very poor MS. (cod. Augustanus) by J. Gretser, Ingolstadt 
1617, and is reprinted in Migne, PG.vol. 79, cols. 311 ff.(3). Not 
only was the MS. bad, but the edition swarms with errors 

(1) I am conscious that 1 should have done some work in this 
direction, but can only plead in excuse that time was lacking. 

(2) F. DE MELY, Les lapidaires de I'antiquite et dw moyen dge, 
vol. I, II, III, fasc. 1, Paris, 1896-1902. The text is to be found in 
vol. II, pp. 193 ff. 

(3) On Anastasius Sinaita see Ehrhard in KRUMBACHER, Gesch ichte 
der byzanlinischen Literaiur* (Munchen 1897), pp. 64-66. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xv 

of every sort. Anastasius Sinafta was a younger contemporary 
of Maximus Confessor, and was the last important writer 
of the Sinai group. Fabricius (1) saw what had escaped 
Gretser, that the Sinaite Anastasius is to be distinguished 
from the patriarch of Antioch who bears the same name 
(559-570, 593-599). The Sinaite's life seems to have cover- 
ed the period approximately from 630-700. His other 
productions do not concern us here. The kernel of the work 
with which we have to deal seems to be genuine, but the pub- 
lished text undoubtedly includes some later accretions, 
which can only be sifted out when the MSS. have been 
carefully investigated. 

The passages which Anastasius cites from Epiphanius are 
contained in Quaestiones 40 and 46. Qu. 40 deals with the 
question : Tt ijv 6 syotid, dt' ofi enriQ&ta 6 IsQsix; rov Osov ; 
The author confuses the breastplate (hoyelov, rationale) with 
the ephod. The second epitome is independent of the first, 
as can be seen by a comparison of the Latin version. The 
Epitome of Anastasius (Ep 2 ) differs from the anonymous 
Epitome (Ep 1 ) in three respects : 

1) It omits all account of the different types of the various 
gems ; 

2) The chief emphasis is placed on the potency of the stones, 
not on their appearance ; 

3) The language is somewhat altered. 

Moreover, Anastasius undoubtedly possessed the complete 
text of the tractate, as the section cited in Qu. 46 shows. 
This comes from the end of the document (Geor. p. 89, 17 ff. 
= Lat. 91-100), but is much condensed. The same passage 
(beginning, however, with 90 of the Latin text) is also quot- 
ed somewhat more fully by Procopius of Gaza (saec. VI) in 
his catena on the Octateuch on Deuteronomy 12.11 f. (2). 
There can be no question that Procopius also had before him 
the complete text of the tractate. It is also to be observed 
that Anastasius cites the work as JIQOS Ai6da>Qov. 

It is noteworthy that Anastasius is the last Greek writer 

(1) FABRICIUS, Bibliotheca Graeca. ed. Harles t. X (Hamburg 
1807), pp. 571-575. 

(2) MIGNE PG. 87. 1, cols. 905B-908B : on Procopius see Ehrhard 
in KRUMBACHER 2 , pp. 125-127. 


xvi EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

who mentions or utilizes the complete text of Epiphanius. 
Apparently the epitome completely drove the unabridged 
text out of use in the region north of the Taurus. Some fur- 
ther traces of the work Will be discussed in a later paragraph, 
Inasmuch as the Greek text of the epitome has been pub- 
lished repeatedly and is conveniently accessible in one form or 
another in any library, it seemed a work of supererogation to 
reprint the text unless new MS. materials were adduced. 
This, however, I have as yet been unable to do, as was pointed 
out above. But though the Greek epitomes give only an 
abbreviated form of the text they often preserve the original 
wording, and their relation to the Georgian text is important 
for the understanding of the latter version. I have there- 
fore decided to append a collation of the Greek Epitomes 
with the Georgian text. As the versions vary considerably in 
the wording, I have included only those variants which 
appear to imply a real divergence in the readings, and have 
excluded or merely noted stylistic divagations. It proved typo- 
graphically impossible to combine the Greek apparatus with 
the Latin, and likewise more convenient to insert it here in 
the introduction than to append it to the body of the Geor- 
gian text. The extract given by Anastasius Sinaita which deals 
with the Samaritans has been inserted in extenso after the 
collations, as it is by no means so readily accessible as the Epi- 
tomes, and the parallel section from Procopius' catena has 
been printed along with it. 


COLLATION OF THE FIRST GREEK EPITOME 
WITH THE GEORGIAN. 


Title : p. 99. 11. 1-4 Sermon ... Epiphanius ] G 1 rov ev dyloiQ 
nargoe fip&v 'Emyavlov 'Emaxdnov KVJIQOV ; post eum + G 1 JIQOQ 
Ai6d(ogov 'Enlaxonov TVQOV 

Text : 4 The -bishop ... 7 spake > G 1 7< post stones -f- G 1 
r&v d'vrcov ev rolg aroAia/toic; rov 'Aagcbv fttfifaov ; post hoc desinit 
textus G 1 : iterum incipit p. 100. 20. Thy honor] G 1 ripiti- 

rare Aiodtoge 20 as is written... 101. 1 priest] negl r&v ev 

r(p Aoyel(p rfjs enwfildos rov legecog ent rov artfdovs 'Aagdbv ngooreray- 
pev(ov rore efiiyienogyifjaBat, Mdcov 1 Now please ... 2 know > 

G 1 2 post have + G 1 rag re %Qoa<; eh' ovv ideas 3 they 

are found > G 1 and what ... in them > G 1 2-4 sen- 

tentias has transposuit G 1 4 inscribed] ereraxro^G 1 ; post 

quod -f- G 1 JidOev re efiQijrai xal noiag narQldos Post hoc 

verbum iterum desinit G 1 : incipit iterum p.102. 10 in the first ... 
rows] G 1 rerQaxfj de diaigslrai rd Aoyelov 13 depth ...breadth] 

G 1 pfixog efigog 15 zmuri] apaQaydos G 1 IGkark'- 

edoni ] G 1 avdQag 17 lugyrioni] G 1 hvyxovQiov 18 aka- 

tey] G 1 a%drrii; 19 iakint'ey G 1 %Qva6Xidoq 20 p'rts- 

khili ] G 1 6vv%iov 23-24 each arranged ... fixed] G 1 e^Qirmevoi 

&v xai <al> diayoQal xai ol ronoi otiroi p. 103. 2 which "is found 
. in Babylon] G 1 6 BaftvAtivios ofaa> xaXotinevog ; in ceteris textui 
quern reconstitui Hiberico similis 8 sparkling] G 1 diav- 

yijs 10 tumors ...11 wounds] G 1 old^nara xal aMag jtAqyas 

15 because of ...16 beet > G 1 16 for those... 18 relief] G 1 

ftafaxnxds de sort arear<o{j,dr(ov 19 according ... 21 easter- 

tide] G 1 rife de a^rrjq Ideaq rvy%dvei ^no^otQl^tav, sfAfJQiOeaTaros de 
[i&Mov nagd rtfv aq^v rov eaqos, d'rs $ aQ%Jj r&v IlaQcov 21 There 

is ... 104. 4 peace > G 1 6 and is ... 7 kark'idon] G 1 vneg rov 

avdqaxa 10 in a stone] G 1 ev xagdia ereqov MOov 13 some 

... Alabastrians] G 1 a\a^darq6v naiv mss. edd. ; legendum est 'AXa- 
Paorgfois nalv 13 for ... 14 Alabastrians > G 1 15 and 

gave ... 18 gave > G 1 19-20 King ... he ... his his] G 1 

fiaaiUaori ... ^ Aafiovaa avrfjs 20 just > G 1 p. 105. 3 

liquid] G 1 %vA6v et semper (1) 4 its fluid ... white > G 1 

5 as the ... 6 drink] G 1 6 dnbrQlficov 6 as when ... 10 

lessened] G 1 xal rov rigor SQOV araOpov ovx eAarrovrat, ovd' 6'A we- 
ll if ...12 water] G 1 xal nivo^evoq 12 it avails ... 13 vision > 
G 1 13 and if ... 16 cure him] G 1 dvnnadei ngds tidgcoaas 
xal rots ano aTayvMjs OaAaaaias fAagaivofidvois : textus Hibericus 

(1) G a 


xvni EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

fj,aivo/j,evot,g reddit, ut in G 2 , rectissime 18 The gem .. 19 

difference] G 1 ovTog teaAeirai ttal ngdaivos' $011, de ttal ^Acogig tip 
elidet, teal dicupoQd tic, evadrois 20 for this ... 21 green> G* 

21 They] G 1 nveg 22 Neronianos ... Dumentianos] 

G 1 in pliir. 22 -106. 1. The Neronianos .., behold] G 1 ttal 6 

NeQ(oviav6s mttQ6g eart, ry eidei aq>6dQa %A.(OQla>v, dieidfyg de teal artt.- 
|3o)v 2 post Neronianos + G 1 ehs Aoftenav6v 3 took oil... 

7 dyed > G 1 7-8 dumentianoni > G 1 8 of copper] 
G 1 Ittavolq 9 rust ] G 1 lov 11 whose rocks ...were 
green in hue > G 1 11 and when ...12 them] G 1 jtoTt^oftevijv 
13 post sparkling -j- G 1 "AMot dd <paai Negfavd TWO, re^vlrnv r&v 
siaAai&v mvaQOTioi&v sir' o$v hiQovQy&v srpevQslv r6 dvayxaiorarov rov 
a ftaQdydov. ttal ex TOVTOV veqfoviavov xaAeiadai it is ... 
Dumentianon] G 1 ol 8 Aoftertavov 13 because ... 18 stones> 
G 1 p. 107. 1. In ... India ] G 1 ev TV "lovdalg. 2 and ...thence] 
G 1 ndvv eoix&c; T$ NeQtoviavfy 3. This ... 7 kapoeti > G 1 

8 The river... 10 Gangey] G 1 0eiao&v dd eanv 6 jiaQa.roiQ "EMrjOiv 
'Ivdog ttaAoti/ievog, naQa toig ^aq^dqoi^ d& rdyyqs 10 The ol- 
der ... 16 ukianos > G 1 16 dzoceulis p'eri] G 1 

xa post 17 the river + G 1 exet ydg yyaivd avQqa^ teal 6 

6 nqdaivos : post hoc vacat G 1 usque ad p. 109, 20 market 

p. 110. 1 reflects ... mirror] G 1 evomQl&aQai ngooconov . ante 2 
knowledge + G 1 siagd Toig (jtv&onoiolg 3 lakint'ey] G 1 av- 

Ogag et semper 4 like to ...5 redness] G 1 ofaog el8o<; dv<pol- 

viaaov e%ei : vide quae editores h. l.-adnot. 5-6 in the regions 

of the Karkedonians] G 1 ev Ka.Q%rid6vi 6 who are Libyans] 

G 1 rfjg At^vrjq 10 and like a blazing furnace ...12 tint> 

G 1 13 sometimes it ... 14 murk > G 1 16 He who 

carries ... 111. 1 avBgalj-} G 1 paaTa6[tevov de ddvvarov diahadelv 6- 
notoig yog av ifiarioig xa.TaxQv(lfj, tf dvTCtvyeia atrov egcodev rfjc; JieQir 
Pohrjg (patverai, oOev xcti avBga^ xen^rai 3 The property ...7 

fire> G 1 9 karkedon] G 1 xegavviog et iterum post 

10 places desinit G 1 usque ad finem paragraphae (111. 24) 
p. 112. 3-4 of a black ...4 bnobi] G 1 cog (lAd-tr-ris nogyi'igag rfjg 
jjiehalvys TO ddog post 6 basilikey + G 1 ^Qvaoony^q 
6 the others ...7 <a>tikey > G 1 8 As I think] G 1 KaL. 
Aeyerai 10 altar ] G 1 repevog ; post eum + G 1 nagd 'Ivdotg 

11 post credible + G 1 tol<; noMols 12 bat'mon] G 1 ''Ava- 
ftad^otig 13 and they ... 14 chains > G 1 14 for this ... 
alek'siponos ] G 1 paene idem quod textus Hibericus exhibet, 
alio autem ordine : "Ea-ti de Qavpaarog 6 MOog ttal evsideaTarog teal yja- 
Qieorarog. Aid nal ev rolg %Uda>cn ttal dgftlateoig ttaratiQeaai TOVTOV, fid- 
liata ol fiaaiMg. 'A^sSlnovoc; de iati 17 The property ... 
.that > G 1 18 scabs ... tumors] G 1 ipvdQaxcov ttal <pvju,dT(ov 
ytvofievag nAqydg : post id + G 1 %Qi6fJisvos Tolg tfAxcojuevois rditoig 
19 that there ... 21 stones] G 1 ttal doOsiaav vofiodeaiav enl UQov 
oanyetQov neyvxevai AeyeTai p. 113. 3 immediate neighbor- 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xix 


hood] G 1 stagd de rd yplhq 4 T'ermagondos] G 1 

laxnant'isa] G 1 'A/iadovvra not > G 1 false : lege.ndum est < ov> 
5 in nature > G 1 7 but to ... 8 bnobi] G 1 dUd dpfttvTega teal 

dpavgorega 8 it emits ... 9 color] G 1 x^wgdv lyei rd a&fia 

9 like that ... rust] G eoitevta 1$ %ahxov exovn tpkefiag rergaarlxovs 
9 Those make ... 11 fables] G 1 e&g de rovro tfteotiaafiev elvat <pav- 
raalag 12 redder] G 1 yfavteorega 13 darker ... flowers] 
G 1 fiaBvrdga rep avdet teal rfj papfj 15 [S]ides[ian] G 1 

"Idris 16 blood ... mother-of-pearl] G 1 afyaros 

19 ruddier] G 1 gavdordga 20 another] G 1 dU' ij, i. e., scriba 

Hibericus &Ur] reddidit 20 which is ... 114. 1 

smoke] G 1 . eari .^avvotdQa xai XevxoreQa, o&re ndvv 
o#re ndhv dnodsovoa post 1 smoke + G 1 etAA^ 6& 

Aov vdan 6fto(a 3 makes people rational] G 1 O.KOC, elvat 

(pavraaicov 3 borders... Hyrcania] G 1 nagd "ipygot 

teal TtoifAeatv "Ygtcavuv 4 and the land ... 5 the tribes 

>G X 7 speckles] G 1 yQaftftdg itdoas upavlios ] G 1 <5 

naAaios (sic F. M.) ; legendum dndUios 9 as though ... 

10 drink > G 1 11 They] G 1 ol fj.vQonoioL 10-11 villa- 

ges or cultivated fields] G 1 rods 0jjgae sv dy@y : post hoc + G 1 
Td (pdafiara 14 lygyrion ] G 1 AiyrfQiov ; AayxovQibv F. M. 

19 well-established expressions] G 1 rfj TQavfj diaMtery 20 I 
think ...21 changed] G 1 ensidr) ai deiai yqatpal rd ovo^ara iri- 
Qcog itersnoiijaavTo p. 115. 1 for they say > G 1 2 and 

different ... 116. 12-13 that which > G 1 post 14 types + 

G 1 Say ydg evQiaxerat 6 UQoq /fafltrregog rfj %Qoigi 14 and is 

...15 stones] G 1 roaovrov dvayttaioregog sort T&V aAAcov : post hoc + 
G 1 BOMB de vdteivQos tfi BQBQ fj vnonoQ(pvQl,cov noa&s 16 They make 
...17 purple] G 1 'Eg vateivQov teal noQ<ptiQa<; rd IsQanted evdrtfAara tte- 
tcoapfiaOai 17 we find ...19 ashes> G 1 19 There 

is ... the sea] G 1 teal 6 psv nq&roq MQos teaAeirai da^aoaiTrjs 
19 and yet ... 20 they call] G 1 6 de devregoe rodyos] G 1 

godtvos 21 and another ... they call] G 1 6 rglrog 

p. 117. 1 and another ... 2 they call] G 1 6 reraQros Uyerai 
k'avnieyos] G 1 %avviaios'(xavviaios1) : post id + G 1 6 de jie^nrog 
nsQiAevteios (ms. naQatefaioe) 2 and many .. 4 colors > G 1 

4 These stones ...5 Scythians] G 1 EvQiaxovrat de o$rot ev rfj eaoDTeQa 
paQpaQiaTfjs Sxvdtag 17 as the ancients say... 118. 18 thither 
> G 1 . p. 118. 19. In this... jacinth > G 1 19 which 

...20 property] G 1 octroi de ol UQoi perd rov elvai no^vTifioi e%ovai 
teal evdgyeiav roiarirrjv : textus Hibericus Armenicum^wi/^rt/u/^t.^'S*^ 
bazmagink' pretiosum per incuriam p.wnji/tu^.nt^t,^ bazmagunk' 
versicolorem legit 20 When... 119. 1 heated] G 1 

ftaMdftevoi els avOgateas nvgog afad fiev ov fikdmoviai, ro^g de avOga- 
teas afievvovoiv 1-2 stole or rag] G 1 dQovri 2-3 he himself ... 
fire > G 1 5 even ... 6 fiercely > G 1 7 to women ... 9 as 

well] G 1 rats nterovoais yvvaifjlv etg evTeteviav 


EpiPHANius 6M ftifi TWELVE StolsfcS 


11 very white] G 1 neQttevxog xaAotfyievog ante 13 complete- 
ly + G 1 r$ eidet vnoKvavtu)v 15 The potency ...18 lion] 

G 1 &ari 8& K rovrcov r&v hlQatv dftdrys iQ&pa. -S^(ov Movros 
18 it heals] G 1 dnorQsnei .I6v 19 an adder ..'.scorpion] G 1 

axoQJtiov teal e%idv&v teal r&v roiovrtov 19 It is ...21 tawny 
> G 1 post p. 120. 2 fire + G 1 .paOtcos post 4 gem + 
G 1 ^ d& fioqtpii avrov 8id<poQos 5 the borders] G 1 rots OQSGI 

6 purer than the jacinth] G 1 vaxlvBcp teadagcp JtaoaJtArjaioe 

7 mother-of-pearl] G 1 d^yt^o'^Act) 7 the regions 
...9 the sea[ G 1 ylverai ev rats 8%Q<us tfjs 6aA.daor)s Tfjs avtrj^ Ai- 
fivrig 9 Its name ...12 the winds > G 1 13 Dzo- 
ceuli] G xQvoofados et semper' 14 regarding which > G 1 
15 < chryso> beryl] G 1 %Qva6<pvM.ov 15 it has ...16 color] 
G 1 xQvatfav n& eanv 16 like a ... vein > G 1 depression 
of the cliff] G 1 (pqeari dmetQq) : post id -{- G 1 naoa rd rei%os 

17 of Ezramenidos in Babylon] G 1 rrjs 3 A%ai[j,evlTido$ BaftvAoi- 
18 Both Babylon ...19 Ak'emenida[ G 1 r^v-yaQ Bafiv- 
xai r6 <PQSCIQ exeivo 'A^aiiisvliida xaAovoiv ,20 as ... 121. 
1 books] G 1 <paaiv 1 There is ...hue] G^ ari 8& teal 

XQvaoanaaros 2 and the force ...3 follows > G 1 : 

sequentia verba ad sensum G 1 7 all white] G 1 yAavxlcav : 

auctor Hibericus reddere videtur a^ToAevx^eoi' 7 like a 

cloud > G 1 7 it seems ... 8 within] G 1 6a?.aooo(}aipfa 

9 it is ...10 hyacinth] G ] e%atv eldoe teal rfji; tidageaTeQas vatti- 
vdov 10 base] G 1 reQfia post Mt. + G 1 rov Kahovpevov 

11-12 holds it to the sun] G ] de^oei ttar &VTIXQV rov rjMov rod 
rov dvanMaai 12 like ...millet] G 1 xey%Qov$ &%<av evdoBsv 

diavyslQ 13 like] G 1 naQanArjoia 14 and another ... 

15 forged out > G 1 15 bed] G 1 egodov 17 P'rtskhili] 

G 1 ovo^iov et semper 18 red ...dark] G 1 ^avQ^v ndw e%ei.ri)v 
ZQoidv 18 - 122, 1 Its tint is mixed > G 1 1 with 

rejoicing ...adorn themselves] G 1 reoitsaQai 2 They make] 
G 1 dvarQsrt>daai 5 is created by congealing in water] G 1 

jiejirj"/&ai post 16 say + G 1 <pvaioAoyix&c; 7 man] G 1 

doreiatv dvdg&v is like] G 1 avvedia^oftevog ms. : avvidia6 ftevos 

editores and because ...9 hue] G 1 avv rfl rov atyuarog Idea 

9 in the sacred places] G 1 dno rov Aomnlov (in Phrygia : cf. 
F. M. ad loc.) : auctor Hibericus reddit dotttfjioiq 10 pur- 
ity and smoothness] G 1 did rb xattaoov Ttj? AsvxoT-qTos post 

10 marble desinit omnino G 1 . 


COLLATION OF THE SECOND GREEK EPITOME 
WITH THE GEORGIAN 

Anastasius Sinaita Quaestiones c. 40 : Migne PG. 89, 

cols, 588A-589D. 


Inc. G 2 p. 103. 1 1 which is found in Babylon] G 2 r6 Bapv- 
xaMfjievov whose appearance> G a 3 is so called 
...7 fish> G 2 7-8 It is found in Assyria] G 2 ylverai fe Iv 

BafivK&vi TQ ttgdg 'AaavqtovQ yfi 8 and] G 2 $ 10 and they 

cure ...12 liniment] G a Jtgdg oid^ara (1) xai Jityyas ano 0i6tfQOv ys- 
vopevas ano%Qi6iJi,Evoi (2) : post hoc vacat G 2 ad finem paragraphae 
p. 104. 6 in appearance ...7 call > G a ante 7 chalcedony + G a 
tJfl^g 9 It was found N ... 105. 1 property > G 2 

3 from the grinding ...4 white> G 2 6 physician] G 2 6 
tinoTQlfiwv 6 who gives ...8 wise> G 2 9 and appear- 
ance> G 2 9 such as ... 10 lessened> G 2 12 it 
avails ...15 principle] G 2 xai ytQdg rag fideo/iavlag mvdpevos teal 
rote dno atatpvhfjs Qahaaalag [taivoftevois 15 the leeches... 16 
cure him> G 2 p. 105. 17 ... 109. 18 as well> G 2 18 At 
present... 19 market] G 2 & d rolg oqeat rots 'Ivdixots oQ^yovres ot 
pa.Q$aQoi x6nrovmv afodv p. 110. 1 The property... mirror] G 2 
C H 8 dvva/tis afooti el TO eaoJiTQlfeodai ra ngdooMta 2 and 
knowledge ...revelations> G 2 3 Jacinth] G 2 avQQag 

4 The colors ...5 redness] G 2 ^d!-v<poivictao<; p&v ean r^ eldei 
7 Others > G 2 7 that this gem ...18 garment] G 2 brevius : 
ot5x ev tfftteq, dAA' Iv vvterl efiglaxeaQai yt6^co6ev yaq d(xr)V (3) Aa/t- 
yiddog rj avdQateog amvdr]Qaxta)v, enl &QCLV Karanavercu (4). 'Ejuyv6vres 
d o! rovrov rjTovvTe$, 8n o^ro'g eanv, d.niqyflvto.i aQds t^v a&ytyv avrov, 
xal evglaxovaw atirdv. Baara^dftsvos d dnotoiq av t^ar^otg xar axahvip- 
07jf(5) ^ atiyfi afooti e|a) ti\q, roaee/i/5oA^fs yatvei : post hoc vacat G 2 usque 
ad p. 111. 24 p. 112. 2 Like porphyry ...8-9 they say that> 
G 2 9 and they stand ...16 alek'siponon> G 2 17 The 
property ...18 tumors] G 2 TQifopevog d ytipaTa xal ipvd@as(&) Idrai 
a$v ydAaxTU lm%Qion&voic; t6noig roig elhKO/jevois. 19 It is writ- 
ten ...21 stones] G 2 Kal tf iv T&OQBI d& r& Mcovafi dodeioa vopodeata 
Inl UQq> GanyelQw heysrat neipr)vevai p. 113. 3 It is found... 5 Cy- 
prus] G 2 G$QlaxGTai de jtaga rd ar6fta Megftddovtos (7) rov nora/toti xai 


(1) V, 1. dtfyfuata, (2) V. 1. ni%Qion&vos. (3) v. 1. ; 

(4) v. 1. KaraTtavofjtevog (5) v. 1, xafrvyOfi (6) v. 1. 

(7) v. 1. eQftod6vto$ 


xxii EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

nagd 'Ana8ovvrla> KJUQOV : post hoc soium dicit de iaspide G 2 : 
acfietiei 8& elg rdg ImAtfipeig p. 114. 13 Ligure] G 2 fidxivQog : post 
quod + G 2 tinonvgltwv fidv sanv et deinde vacat usque ad 
p. 117. 4 colors 7 The heathen which are> G 2 7 <G>eti 
and Yni] G 2 P6r0ot xal Aavvsg (v. 1. ; in textu Adveig) 8 [L]arii... 
Amazons> G 2 Beyond] G 2 sxei and dark > G 2 

11 their summits ...13 cliffs> G 2 post 14 down + G 2 dtg 

dno ret%a>v 15 it is ... bottom] G 2 fere ad sensum, alio 

autem verborum ordine, sicut L 16 and ...there] G 2 &ajtegri 

%dog (cf. L) 17 In the depths ... 18 the men] G 2 iv 

fj 18 who come ... 118. 1 the gem] G 2 ot dneara^dvot dnf> 

t&v sxeiae nA,r)ma6vrcov ftaoiMcav xarddtxol elai xal 0ia6(ievoi 
1 Thereupon ... 2-3 carcasses] G 2 fere idem 3 into 

the depths] G 2 elg n %dog rfjg ydoayyog 4 post nest + G 2 

avwdev 4 uneasy ... 5 fledgelings > G 2 6 into 

the ...abysses> G 2 7 carcasses of the lambs] G 2 rove, 

&Qvoi>g s%ovrag rotig UQovg 9 of the lambs > G 2 10 inac- 

cessible places] G 2 dxgcoQeia 11 The men ... 18 thi- 

ther] G 2 ot de xarddixoi axontfaavreg nov dviq^Qviaav vn6 r&v der&v rd 
xqea dnsQ%ovrai xal oflrco yegovai roiig UBovg 19 In thiswise 

...20 precious > G 2 21 and lays... 119. 1 but if > G 2 

no> G a (false?) 3 while the fragment ...6 fiercely] 

G 2 $.8$ dQovrj dfikajlrig nsvei 7 when they ...8 to 

them> G 2 8-9 and dispels ...9 as well> G 2 11 very 

white] G 2 vnoxvavicov 11 in color ...12 like ^mar- 

ble > G 2 15 the potency ...17 the lion> G 2 17 They 

rub up ... 20 scorpion] G 2 TQifiofisvog. de snl rift nsr&nw 8rjy 
fiarog dnorgsitsi novov axoQniatv re xal s^idv&v 19-20 It is 

...tawny> G 2 p. 120. 2 glows..: fire] G 2 <pXoyiaw HEV sari 

padecog 3 in which... 4thegem> G 2 5 borders] G 2 ogsaiv 
5 there are ...8 is Libya > G 2 9 Its name ...12 the 

winds> G 2 14 the bloodstone ...16 a vein] G 2 %Qva6faQo<; 
vfievean 16-17 It is found ...17 Babylon] G 2 stiQia- 
EV 8e rfj 'AtpQalridi (v. 1. tpQedndi preferendum) nir^q. nagd (v. 
1. no6g) ro %eifo<; rfjg 'A%ai[j,v(.dog Bafivfaovog ...17 the depres- 

sion in the cliff] G 2 rft (fQsag 19 For they say ...121. 3 

follows> G 2 3 when ...5 swollen] G 2 paene idem, similius 

autem textui Latino . 7 all white] G 2 yXavxi^cav (cf. 

Lat.) 7 Like a cloud ...9 hyacinth> G 2 10 base] G 2 rd 

reQf4ara(ms. anEQfAara) ante 10-Tauros + G 2 rov xaAovfisvov : 

aliud de beryllo abest apud G 2 jj( 18 red ... dark ] G 2 av66v 
fiev sanv ; post hoc G 2 solum habet : e-vQtaxerai 8s xal otirog Iv r$ 
avrcp OQSL. 


Anastasius Sinaita, Procopius Gazensis, Catena 

Quaestio 45 : Migne, PG. 89, in Octateuchum ad Deutero- 
cols. 595c-598B. nomium 12. 11 sqq. : Migne, 

PG. 87. 1, cols. 905B-908B. 

... 'EgavdQanodiadsicecbv de 
rcov detea cpvAcov teal rfj$ n6heco<; 
egtf/jiov < yevo/j,vr)$ perearriaav 
1% rcov ecbcov fjteQwv elg eteei- 
vag rag n6hei<; rcov 'AaavQicov 
ol fiaaiAeis nctog cpvAatctfv rov 
ronov edvrj reaaaga rode Kv- 

diatovi; teal rods KovQiatovs v 

teal ZsyQaaiaCovG (v. 1. Sen- 
<paQovaiovg) KV.\ 9 AvayafiaiovQ 
(v. 1. 'Avayoyavatovc;). Ofiroi 
de etc re rfj<; Ha^aQeiag ex re 
rfji; (pvhattvis cbvo/tdadqaav Sa- 
[AaQelrai, ol eQ^vevof^evot, <p6- 
Aaxeg tcara rtfv rcov XaAdatcov 
yhcbaaav. - 

'Emcpavtov etc rov MQOS A to- 
dcoQov. SopOQcbv ju,ev otiv etc^- 
Bri ro OQOS teal ra ojuoQovvra 
and ZefJiifiQ, evoi; vlov rcov 
Xavavaicov, nolv rj enij3f)vcu 
rov 'AfiQaafji, rfj yfj. 'EWov- 
rcov de rcov cpvhdtccov, exAtfOr]- 
aav ZafiaQeirai, rovr' eart, 
'cpvAanei;. @vA.atees de fjaav ov 
fjiovov rfjg yfjs, dMa teal rov 
vopov ' scpvliarrov ydg rtfv ITev- 
rdrev%ov ftovrjv, rjv ehafiov did 
"Eadga rov fiacnAecoG (1), Iva 
ete rovrov diatCQivyrai ro aneQ- 
ju,a rov 3 Af$Qadfji aXX ov re- 
Aetcog rov v6[Ji,ov ecpvharrov, dio 
cprjaiv fi FQafpri "E/netvav 
noiovvres rov VOJLIOV rov Oeov 


'Eg^ve^erai ro fjtev ' Fagi- 
eiv, ogot; ^eXvrQCOfievcov, ij dia- 
naQOLtciaq avrcov ro de 
fjie/Liaraico/j,evcov 
^ cbdivcov , avrcov. Eltcorcos acta 
eg?' ofi ph al evAoyiai, eg?' o $ 
de al ttardqai. Keirai de ravra 
tcara ro avarohitcov JLIBQOI; "leqi- 
%ov<; enetteiva rov Fa^ya^ ro- 
nov. Ol de ZapaQelrai vofii- 
ovaiv avrd naqateelaBai Sitei- 
pois noXei rfj teal Zv%e/Li, evda 
naQa rco cpQeari, dieA,e%6r) Kv- 
QIOQ rfj SafiaQeindi. "H vvv 
tcahelrai NednoAig, tcaheirai de 
teal Safjtaqeia enel ro o^og, 
6 cpaai FaQielv, f}v rov Zco- 

rov 


(1) leg. 


xxiv EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

teal ngoatcvvovvreg rd e'ldco^a. [AOQ&V. 9 j8e/5atc&0^ ds roftvopa. 
Tov 6e voftov teehevovrog e'ldco- /nerd rods dnoaraXevrag etc rov 
MQofftevveiaOai, n&g eri paaiAecog rcov 'AaavQicov eytea- 

ai ; "E%ei de v\ vno- Olaai rfj yfi. To. ds rcov 
Beaig TOV rgonov tovrov yvov- KOVVTODV edvrj, ol 
res yap ol IMO.QOI (1) r&v rqv naQoiav rcov 
reaaaQcov eBvfov 6n evsdtf/u,?]- ox; dnoarQecpofjtdvovg sv raig 
aev "EadQaq, ^de^vrrof^evog rd ev%atc; OQQV nqog TO 6'gog, c&g 
eidcoAa fcard rov vo/tov 6sov, dv e%oi ra>v ev%oju,svcov fj yfj 
anevaavrsg exgwyav rd eWco- K^ifJiaKog re teal Qdaecog. Ol 
Aa ev ra> FaQi^r) OQSI ev [AVftfi) yaQ ISQEIQ ra>v sdvcov ra>v o' 
nvi teal dnearQeyav (2) rqv yvovreg , tig evedtf/trjaev "Ea- 
xagdiav r&v ZaftaQsir&v nqog dgag ftdeAvrrdftsvog rd eWco- 
ro oQog ev%eaQai. "O6sv onov ha, vojuov e%cov Oeov rov xshsd- 
d' av fiat, ngog TO OQog ev%ov- ovra rov eldco^o^arQovvra fa6o- 
rai ol cmo dvaroAfjg ngdg dva- fiohelaQai, anevaavreg eytfJQav 
[idg dnoarQe<p6ftevoi, nal ano and r&v fiipqA&v o'ixwv rd 
nQog dvaroAdg, teal and eidcoAa teal ev [tv%& nvi rov 
g nQog rjjv /tearjjupQtav, Taqi^eiv nareKQvyav oQovg, & 
TO dQurqjov rat 6'oet nQoa- tf naQadoaig s%ei. Kal 
e%ovreg ev%ovrai, Iva nAr)QO)- tedrco r&v eld<bho>v, ol 
dfj rj rqafpY] tf heyovaa' "E- gelrai nQoaei)%ovrai, %dv rjy~ 
jueivav noiovvreg rov VO[JLOV rov vorjxaat rovro. "Adtivarov ydg 
0eov Kal ngooKvvovvreg avr&v tpevaaoBai ryv FQayfjv heyov- 
rd eidoiXa. El ydq Kal avrol oav, a "Epeivav noiovvreg rov 
dyvoovai xeifidvcov rcov eldco- vo/iov rov 0eov, teal nqoattv- 
A.CDV eteetae, dW ov dvvarov vovvreg rd avr&v eidcoAa. 3 Eni 
ear i ri\v Oeiav rgayrjv ipev- de rov ogovg, 8neg evopiaav Fa- 
oaaBai. gt^eiv, vaov tearaateevdaavreg 

ri%%ovro. Kairoi el tfv 
teal Faifidh ogr) rd 
va NeanoAei, ansQ elalv 
rara, n&g av xdrcoOev 
evAoylag tf rfjg ttardqag ijxovov, 
etcareqag dva) Aeyo/te'v'rjg, teal 


(1) HIS. 

(2) v. 1. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xxv 


nheiatov rov tiyovst &s vvv 
oQarai, rvy^dvovrog ; El? yaq 
r6 nag' avrojv Asyo/tevov 
t,Biv, t a xal 9?', &g yaai, 
aiv dvQ%ovrai. "E%ei ds xal 
fl atcoAovdla rfjg fttfiAov rov 
'Irjaov, d>Q ttara avctToArjv 'Ie- 
Qi%ovg ra d-6(o xadarr]xev ogr), 
evda teal TOTCOQ ra rdAyaAa ddco 
arj/teiois antyovTa rfji; TioAecpQ. 
'H ds ZHxifta i;fjg 3 IeQi%ov 
us xal dvnxoDTEQa 
avrfji; ans%ovaa vfi' . 


THE VERSIONS OTHER THAN GEORGIAN. 


7. THE LATIN VERSION. 

Far more has come down to us in the Latin version (1), which 
by some curious trick of fate has survived as a ' rider ' on the 
well-known Collectio Avellana, a corpus of early papal let- 
ters and decretals (2). The Latin text of the tractate was not in- 
cluded in Petavius' edition, and was first published by Fr. Fog- 
gini (Rome, 1743), in his book entitled S.Epiphanii Salaminis 
in Cypro episcopi, deXII Gemmis rationalis summi sacerdotis 
hebraeorum Liber ad Diodorum, accompanied by a series of 
learned notes : the whole was reprinted in Migne, PG. 43, 
cols. 322-366. Dindorf (3) merely repeated Foggini's text and 
notes. 0. Giinther has now published a modern critical edi- 
tion in the Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (4). 

Foggini used a copy (cod.Vat. Lat. 4961) of the best MS., V, 
(Vaticanus Lat. 3877, s. XI inc.) ; hence Giinther was able in 
some cases to better the text from the older manuscript tradi- 
tion. The MS . is by no means an accurate one, and close editor- 
ial supervision is required. Giinther was peculiarly happy 
in his emendations, and a number of them are brilliantly 
confirmed by the Georgian text. 

The date of the Latin version is a matter of doubt, but 
indirect testimony shows that it cannot have been late. 


(1) See note 4. 

(2) On this collection see FF.MAASSEN, Geschichte der Quellen und 
der Literatur des kanonischen Rechtes, etc. I (Graz 1870), pp. 787- 
792, the Prolegomena to O. Giinther's edition cited below 
(note 4), and the various other articles by him cited therein. 

(3) Opera Epiphanii, Lipsiae 1861, t. IV. 1, p. 169-223. 

(4) Epistulaeimperatorumpontificum aliorum inde db a. CCCLXVII 
vsque ad a. DLIII datae Avellana quae dicitur collectio ex recensione 
Ottonis Gventher, Pars I-II, Vindobonae 1895, 1898. The text is 
fouu4 on pp. 743-773, 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xxvn 


Furthermore, it cannot be by Jerome, who uses a section 
of the account of the jasper in somewhat abbreviated form 
in his commentary on Isaiah. I quote in parallel columns 
the passage from Jerome and the text of the Latin version 
to illustrate this point : 


HlERONYMI COMM. 

IN ISAIAH lib. xv, 
in cap. 54 (MIGNE, PL. 
24, cols. 525A-B). 

Jaspidum multa 
sunt genera : alius est 
enim smaragdi ha T 
bens similitudinem, 
qui reperitur in fon- 
tibus Thermodontis 
fluminis et vocatiir 
grammatias (Valiarsi 
e cod. Ambros. AMA^ 
QOYCIOC) quo omnia 
phantasmata fugari 
autumant ; alius vi- 
ridior mari, et tinc- 
tus quasi floribus ; 
hunc in Phrygiae 
Monte Ida, et in pro- 
fundissimis specubus 
eius nasci referunt. 
Alium vero iuxta Ibe- 
ros Hyrcanosque et 
mare Caspiurn repe- 
riri, et p'raecipue iux- 
ta lacuni Neusin. Est 
et alius iaspis, nivi et 
spumae marinorum 
fluctuum similis, et 
elementer quasi mix- 
to cruore subrutilans. 


TEXT ED. GUNTHER, pp. 751, 3 - 752, 1. 


Iaspis est lapis uelut speciem smaragdi 
referens, qui apud ostia Thermodontis flu- 
minis inuenitur et apud Amathunta : non 
quae in Cypro est, sed naturaliter Amathu- 
siorum generatio multiplex habetur. Hie 
uero lapis hanc habet speciem : sub sma- 
ragdo est interuirescens sed obtunsior et 
obscuripr, interiusque corpus habet uiride 
ad instar aeruginis aeris. Delectantur autem 
phantasiae, id est speculationes, huic in- 
sidere, sicut asserunt, qui fabulosa comme- 
morant. Est et alia' iaspis albidior . quam 
mare, flore uero tincturaque pressior. Alia 
vero in speluncis Idae montis, qui est in 
Phrygia, reperitur similis sanguini cochleae, 
sed lucidior magis et ueluti similior uino et 
amethysto rubicundior. Non enim sunt 
unius coloris eiusdemque potentiae, sed 
alia quidem rarior est et albidior quam aer 
fumi, nee nimis effulgens nee impar, item 
caeruleae uibrationis, ueluti si tempore 
hiemis de terra uapor aut nebula austro 
desinente consurgat. Alia, quae glaciei 
similis est, ab his, qui fabulosa fingunt, 
phantasiis dicitur esse remedium. Reper- 
tum est autem ab Hiberis et pastoribus 
Hyrcanorum, qui circa Caspium solum 
lacumque consistunt. Est et alter iaspis, 
qui vocatur oppalius, similis niuibus aut 
spumis maris aut ueluti si sanguis lacti 
misceatur. 


The opening paragraphs (1-6) of the letter of Epiphanius to 
Diodorus are cited by Facundus Hermianensis, an African wri- 
ter and prelate (ca. 500-570), in his polemical work against 


xxviii EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

Justinian's Tria Capitula (1). Certain variations between the 
two versions are apparent, which concern style rather than 
sense, but the close verbal similarities make it probable that 
Facundus merely touched up our present text, and did not 
make a new translation of his own (2). The fact that the 
translation was known in Africa ca. 550 would naturally lead 
us to suppose that its origin is to be attributed to the 5th 
century. It is clear that Jerome made his own translation 
and at the same time cut down the superabundant verbi- 
age of the original. Thus we cannot accuse the Stridonite 
of being the author of the extant Latin text. It is not un- 
worthy of Rufinus, but the opposition in which Epiphanius 
and Rufinus stood makes it almost incredible that the pres- 
byter of Aquileia could have undertaken the task. It must 
have been the work of some anonymous writer between the 
years 410 and 550. 


(1) Pro defensione trium capitulorum,MiGNE, PL 67., cols. 527 B ff ; 
the citation is found in cols. 617 c sqq.On Facundus see the litera- 
ture in M. SCHANZ, Romische Liter aturgeschichte, IV. 2 (1920), 
pp. 581-2. 

(2) The variations are given in Giinther's edition, but I have not 
deemed it necessary to include them in the apparatus criticus. 


8. THE SYRIAC VERSION. 

We have seen above that a complete translation of the negl 
fietQcov teal araOfi&v exists in Syriac (1), and it seemed likely 
that some traces of the sister production on the twelve stones 
might have survived in that tongue. The scrutiny of avail- 
able catalogues which I undertook, however, unearthed only 
one possibility. This was a short fragment ascribed to our 
author in the British Museum MS. No. 753 (saec. VI) in, 
Wright's catalogue (2). The MS. is a large and ancient collec- 
tion of excerpts from various patristic authors. Through the 
kindness of Mr. F. R. Hall, the Comptroller of the Oxford 
Press, I obtained an excellent photostatic print of the leaf 
in question. The leaf contained some nineteen lines of text 
which appeared at first sight to be akin to the discussion 
of the beryl in the third part of the tractate (3), but a closer 
examination, which Professor D. S. Margoliouth of Oxford 
was kind enough to make for me (4), showed that first 
impressions are deceitful. The fragment proved to be a clum- 
sy conglomerate of tags from one of the spurious homilies of 
Epiphanius (5). No genuine fragments of our tractate have 
come down to us in Syriac, as far ,as I am aware, but evi- 
dence to be adduced below (6) will, I think, show clearly 
that a Syriac translation must have existed. 


(1) See above, 3. 

(2) W. WEIGHT, Catalogue of the Syriac Mss.in the British Mu- 
seum acquired since the year 1838, vol. II (London 1872), p. 699 : 
the fragment is on f. 165s. 

(3) Page 160, 2-4 of the translation. I thought for a time that it 
might fit into the lacuna there. 

(4) In his letter to me of May 25, 1924. I desire to express my 
sincere thanks to him here for his kindness. 

(5) The homily in question is the els rfv ray^v TOV KvQlov (ed. 
Dindorf, vol. IV. 2, 9 ff =PG. 43, col. 440 A ff.) ; the passages come 
from pages 20-25 of Dindorf's edition. 

(6) See 25. 


9. FRAGMENTS OF THE COPTIC SAHIDIC VERSION 


BY 


H. DE Vis. 


A number of fragments of this important tractate of the 
Cypriote bishop have been preserved in a Sahidic translation ; 
they are scattered about in different libraries in Europe 
and in Cairo, and a part of them has been published hap- 
hazardly more coptico by various scholars. The literature 
on this subject is partially cited by 0. BARDENHEWER (1). 
We have looked up Bardenhewer's bibliography, and in 
going through the catalogues of various libraries we have 
been so fortunate as to identify a certain number of very 
important new fragments of Epiphanius' work. All the 
leaves which we have succeeded in identifying up to the 
present belong to a single manuscript. But it is by no means 
impossible that further fragments of the manuscript may 
come to light, now that the whole document has been edited 
in the Georgian version with an English translation. 

The leaves which at present can be identified are the 
following : 

A. ZOEGA, Catalogus Codicum Copticomm MSS. qui in 
Museo Borgiano Velitris asseruantur (Romae, 1810), No. 
CCLV, pp. 608-9. One leaf, numbered CN&.-CNB : 251-252, 
including the tail-end of the letter of Epiphanius to Dio- 
dorus, the description of the sardion, and part of that of 
the topaz. (MIGNE, P.O., XLIII, 324A-325A ; BLAKE, 102, 
21 - 105, 16). This leaf was originally published with a Latin 
version by GIORGI, De Miraculis Sancti Coluthii et reliquiis 
actorum .Sancti Panesniv martyrum, thebaica fragmenta duo 


(1) Geschichte der altchristlichen Literatur, III (Freiburg, 1910), 
pp. 300-301. ; 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xxxi 

(Romae, 1793), pp. 313-318. In our edition we reproduce 
Zoega's text. 

B. PARIS, BIBLIOTHEQUE NATIONALE, Fonds copte No. 131 5 . 
Fol. 40. One leaf. The numbers of the pagination are lost. 
Contains the latter third of the description of the emerald 
(MIGNE, P.O. XLIII, 328A - 33U ; BLAKE, 107,13-109,18). 
This leaf was published by E. O.WINSTEDT, Proceedings of the 
Society for Biblical Archaeology, t. XXXII (1910), pp.27-32, 
73-77, with an English translation. Corrections by 0. VON 
LEMM, Koptische Miscellen I, No.XCV, Zu Epiphanius Schrift 
neQiwv $' M6o>v (Leipzig, 1914), pp. [283-285] = Bulletin 
de V Academic Impe'riale des Sciences de St. Petersbourg, Serie 6, 
t. V (1911), pp. 327-329. See the review by P. PEETERS, 
Analecta Bollandiana, t. XXXI (1912), p. 463. 

C. PARIS, BIBLIOTHEQUE NATIONALE, Fonds Copte, no; 131 2 , 
Fol. 88. One leaf numbered CN^-cfiH : 257-258. Contains 
the end of the description of the emerald, the whole of the 
description of the carbuncle, and the first words of that of 
the sapphire (MIGNE, P. G. t XLIII, 33U-333A ; BLAKE, 
109,18 - 112,3). This 'leaf is the continuation of the pre- 
ceding one, which in consequence must have been paginated 
cfie-cfic- : 255-256. Unpublished. 

D. PARIS, BIBLIOTHEQUE NATIONALE, Fonds Copte 131 2 , fol. 
89. One leaf numbered c|F-cf5. : 263-264, which contains 
a part of the description of the ligure (MIGNE, P. G., XLIII, 
337A-339A; BLAKE, 115,1-117,12). I owe the reference to 
the two leaves C and D to W. CRUM, Catalogue of the Coptic 
Mss. in the British Museum (London, 1905), No. 180, p. 70. 
These two leaves are edited and translated here for the 
first time. 

E. PARIS, BIBLIOTHEQUE NATIONALE, Fonds Copte 131 3 , fol. 
46-50. Five complete leaves, numbered eft? , cftH , cft-e- , cq , 
cql, cqE, cqf , cqx, cqe, cq& : 287, 288, 289, 290, 291, 
292, 293, 294, 295, 296. These leaves contain a large portion 
of the enumeration of the tribes (MIGNE, P. G., XLIII, 
350B-363A; BLAKE, 181, 20 - 191, 18-19). They were.identi- 


t>It>HANltJfe ON THE TWELVE STONES 

fied as belonging to our tractate by M. I'abb6 Saint Paul 
Girard, Conservateur de 1'Institut Francais d'Archeologie 
Orientale au Caire. Having learned that we were preparing 
an edition of the scattered fragments of the Twelve Precious 
Stones, he was so kind as to send us the photographs of the 
above fragments, with a transcription of the text by his 
own hand. It is this text which we publish here. 

F. BRITISH MUSEUM. Or. 3581 a (8). CRUM, Catalogue of 
the Coptic Mss. in the British Museum, No. 180, p. 70. This 
fragment bears the numbers cqa-f : 299-300. The leaf 
is fragmentary. It continues the enumeration of the 
tribes. The Latin text does not appear in MIGNE and is 
lacking in BLAKE. Between this fragment and those preceding 
only one leaf is missing, cq^-cqB : 297-298. Published by 
GRUM, loc. cit. 

G. INSTITUT FRANCAIS D'ARCHEOLOGIE ORIENTALE AU CAIRE. 
One leaf bearing the numbers f N?-f NH : 357-358. Not cata- 
logued. It contains the last part of the interpretation of the 
agate and the first part of that of the amethyst. The Latin 
version is not preserved ; BLAKE, 151,13 - 152,14 This 
leaf was discovered and identified by M. 1'abbe Saint Paul 
Girard, who kindly sent us a photograph of it and a tran- 
scription of the text by his own hand, which is here pub- 
lished for the first time. Between this fragment and the pre- 
ceding one there is a lacuna of 56 pages. 

H. CAIRO MUSEUM. A fragment published by H. Mu- 
NIER, Catalogue General des Antiquites Egyptiennes du 
Musee du Caire, Vol. LXXIV, Manuscrits Copies (Le Caire, 
1916), pp. 122-124, No. 9273. Deals with the interpretation 
of the chrysolith.- This passage is lacking in the Latin ver- 
sion : BLAKE, 152,23 - 154,28. The leaf is very fragmen- 
tary and can only be read with difficulty. The numbers 
of the pagination are lost. M. Munier was so good as to 
make a new collation with the original for us, and suggests 
certain corrections of his first edition, which we adduce in 
our text. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xxxm 

I. BRITISH MUSEUM Or. 3581 a(8), No. 2. CRUM, Catalogue 
of the Coptic MSS. in the British Museum, No. 180, pp. 
70 b -71 a . A single complete leaf bearing the numbers ff'O-fo : 
369-370. These come from the interpretation of the beryl. 
Lacking in the Latin version (BLAKE, 156,31-157,26). 
Published by CRUM, loc. cit. 

J. BRITISH MUSEUM Or. 3581 a(8). No. 3. CRUM, Catalogue 
of the Coptic Mss. in the British Museum, No. 180, pp. 71 b -72 a . 
A single complete leaf numbered f 6e-f 08- : 375-376. Con,- 
tinues the interpretation of the beryl. Lacking in the Latin 
version. BLAKE, 159, 34 - 160, 4. Published by CRUM, loc. cit. 

K. ZOEGA, Catalogus Codicum Copticorum MSS. qui in 
Museo Borgiano Velitris asservantur (Romae, 1810). No. 
CCLV, pp. 610-611. One leaf numbered ffcf-fn5L : 383-384. 
Contains the end of the interpretation of the beryl and the 
beginning of that of the onyx. Lacking in the Latin version. 
BLAKE, 164, 3 - 165, 4. CRUM, loc. cit., p. 70, suggests : 
Perhaps Zoega CCLV belongs to our MS. There is no 
doubt whatsoever on this point. 

L. ZOEGA, Catalogus Codicum Copticorum MSS. qui in 
Museo Borgiano Velitris asservantur (Romae, 1810), No. 
CXXXI. Four leaves numbered f ne , fit? , f ftH , f n , f q 
fqSc, fqE, fqf : 385, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392, 393. The 
text is a continuation of the preceding fragment. The scribe 
has skipped the number f ftfr : 386, probably because of the 
similarity between the figures e and *. We must therefore 
reduce the following numbers by one. The Coptic text has 
been published by I. GUIDI, Frammenti Copti, III, pp. 67-72 : 
Rendiconti della Reale Academia dei Lincei, Classe di Scienze 
morali, storiche, filologiche (Roma, 1888), Vol. Ill, 2, pp.37-42. 
These leaves were not recognized as belonging to our text by 
the first editor, but were afterwards connected and identified 
with it in a brillant article by O.VON LEMM, Kleine Koptische 
Studien, XXIV : Ein Usher nicht erkanntes Fragment aus 
Epiphanius Schrift jflegt tr&v i$ hi&wv = Bulletin de VAca- 
demie Imperiale des Sciences de St. Petersbourg, Serie 5, t. 


xxxiv EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

XIV (1901), pp. 296-301. Lacking in the Latin version 
(BLAKE, 165, 5 - 176, 30). 

The fragments already published by the authors mentioned 
are here reproduced exactly as they stand in the original 
edition with the exception of fragment H, in which we ad- 
duce the editor's emendations of his original edition. 


Description of the Manuscript. 

We believe it will be useful to give a rather detailed de- 
scription of the manuscript in order to facilitate the identi- 
fication of any missing leaf which may chance to be discovered 
in the course of further research (1). 

The manuscript is on parchment : each page measures 
354 by 280 mm. The parchment is coarse and decidedly 
yellowish. .Some of the surviving leaves are badly damaged, 
being torn, punctured, smeared, and stained by dampness. 
The text is written in two columns, each 'consisting of 33 
to 59 lines (an average of 34 lines). The letters are between 
5 and 6 mm. high. The writing is in brownish ink, in an up- 
right hand of type VI of ZOEGA ; tables XI and XIII of 
CIASGA ; pp. 73 and 75 of TISSERANT, Specimina Codicum 
Orientalium ; and HYVERNAT, Album, pi. XI, 2. But as 
CRUM (2) observes, in HYVERNAT'S Album the character is 
larger than ours . CRUM (3) has shown that the manuscript 
comes from the library of the White Cloister (Shenuti's 
Monastery) at Akhmim (4). The manuscript is dated in 
the tenth century by all authorities. 

Large, coarse initials, written in black against a red paint- 
ed shading in the margins, mark the beginning of the para- 
graphs. In the first column, in the left hand margin, these 
initials are accompanied by one or more crudely drawn sym- 

(1) See the brief description of the manuscript in GRUM, Cat. Brit. 
Mas. No. 180, p. 70. 

(2) Cat. Brit. Mas. No. 180, p. 70. 

(3) Loc. cit. 

(4) On this cloister, see in particular J. LEIPOLDT, Schermte von 
Atripe und die Entstehung des national^aegyptischen Christentums 
(Leipzig, 1903), (TU. N.F. X, 1), p. 92 et seq. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xxxv 

bols, somewhat resembling a three-petaled flower, outlined 
in black ink, with the outer petals painted red, the middle 
one green. These symbols rarely appear in the second column. 
But on the other hand, the ends of the paragraphs in this 
column are indicated by a line between two dots, drawn in 
black ink, and shaded in red, ~, these signs appearing 
usually in the space between the columns. The cola are 
divided into groups of words separated by one or two dots 
in black, shaded in red. As accents we find above the letters 
a short black line, very often reduced to a mere dot. Fre- 
quently the i is surmounted by two black dots. The first line 
at the beginning of each column usually contains two or three 
letters chosen rather at random, which are larger than the 
others and extend far beyond the ordinary level of the line. 
These are nearly always shaded in red. Although, as a rule, 
the scribe writes each letter by itself, separated from the 
others, we note in his hand a marked tendency to connect 
certain groups of letters by prolonging one of their component 
lines. Thus the groups M.M., NM., M.N, Hilt, nw. are almost 
always joined together by the serifs of their bases. 
In the same way, the serifs of the bases of the letter & 
are prolonged so as to connect with the following letter. 
In the letter & the cross bar extends far beyond the limits 
of the ellipse and is joined to the following letter. This 
regularly occurs when e follows e- : in this case the same 
cross bar serves for the letter -e- and as median bar of the 
letter e. No doubt for aesthetic reasons the circle of the 
letter ([> is always enlarged out of proportion, and the 
vertical hasta extends far above and below the general level 
of the other letters. This letter is usually ornamented by two 
red dots, one in each semi-circle. 

The manuscript is paged in the right-hand top corner of the 
recto and the left-hand corner of the verso. The size of the 
figures is smaller than that of the letters in the text. The 
figures are placed between two parallel horizontal lines 
drawn in red and black, having at the sides a sketchy orna- 
ment consisting of dots and curved lines drawn in red and 
black. The ornamentation of the figures is different on each 
page. The ornamentation of the margin and the page numbers 
seems to have been done by the same hand. 


xxxvi EHPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

We cannot conclude this notice without expressing our 
profound gratitude, first of all, to Professor Robert P. Blake, 
who has paid us the honor of giving our study a place in his 
edition of the Georgian and Armenian texts of the Twelve 
Precious Stones. He has kindly supplied us with several 
photographs from Paris and Cairo, and has always assisted 
us with his advice and encouragement. 

Next, we wish to give our deepest thanks to the R. P. Paul 
Peeters, S. J., the Bollandist. If we -have been able to com- 
plete the Latin version and find our way through the labyrinth 
of a text which has been maltreated by the translator and the 
copyists, mutilated and defaced by time, we owe it in great 
part to his advice, his helpfulness, and his vast philological 
knowledge. In the world of Orientalists, the helpfulness and 
disinterestedness of Father Peeters have become proverbial. 
He was so kind as to assume the thankless task of going over 
our Latin version minutely, and we take pleasure in paying 
him the tribute of stating that in many, obscure places where 
we had almost lost our way, he has put us on the right track. 

Last, but not least, we owe a debt of gratitude to M. 1'Abbe 
Saint Paul Girard. For a long time the noted Conservateur 
de 1'Institut Francais d'Archeologie Orientale au Caire had 
planned to publish the scattered Coptic fragments of the 
Twelve Precious Stones of St. Epiphanius. Having learned, 
however, that we had the intention of publishing the same 
fragments parallel with Professor Blake's Georgian version, 
he graciously allowed us precedence. 


LIST OF THE COPTIC FRAGMENTS 

AND THEIR CORRESPONDING PASSAGES 

IN THE LATIN AND GEORGIAN VERSIONS. 


FRAGM. |l 

LIBRARIES WHERE 
THE FRAGMENTS 
ARE PRESERVED 

PAGE NUM- 
BERS IN 
COPT. Ms. 

fc 
o 

M 

H 

u 

W 

03 

CONTENT 

LATIN VER 

SION P.O., 

XLIII 

GEORGIAN 
VERSION. 
BLAKE 






Col. 

Pag. 

A. 

ZOEGA, Cat. GCLV, 

251 

I 

De Sardio 

324A-325A 

102, 21 - 


published by him, 

252 

II 

De Topazio 


105, 16 


ibid., p. 609. 






B. 

Paris. Fonds Copte 

255 

III 

De Smaragdo 

328A-331A 

107, 13 - 


131 , Fol.40. Published 

256 




109, 18 


>V WlNSTEDT. 






C. 

5 aris. Fonds Copte 

257 

III 

De Smaragdo 

331A-333A 

109, 18- 


31 a , Fol. 88. 

258 

IV 

De Carbunculo 


112,3 


Unpublished. 


V 

De Sapphire 



D. 

Paris. Fonds Copte 

263 

VII 

De Ligyrio 

337A-339A 

115, 1 - 


312, FoL gg. 

264 




117, 12 


Unpublished. 






E. 

Paris. Fonds Copte 

287 



De Enumeratio- 

350B-363A 

181, 20 - 


31 8 , Fol. 46, 47, 48, 

288 


nibus Tribuum 


191, 18-19 


9,50 

289 






Unpublished. 

290 







291 







292 







293 







294 







295 







296 





F. 

Brit. Mus. 3581 A(8). 

299 - 



De Enumeratio- 

gap in text 

lacking 


Published by CRUM, 

300 


nibus Tribuum 




Cat. No. 180. 






G. 

nst. Franc. Arch. 

357 

VIII 

De Achate 

gap in text 

151, 13 - 


Or., Cairo. Not cata- 

358 

IX 

De Amethysto 

W 

152, 14 


ogued ; unpublished. 






H. 

Cairo, Museum. 



X 

De Chrysolitho 

gap in text 

153, 23 - 


Published by MUNIER, 

i 




154,28 


Catalogue, pp. 122-124 


* 




I. 

Brit. Mus. 3581 A(8), 2 

369 

XI 

De Beryllo 

gap in text 

156, 31 - 


Published by CRUM, 

370 




157, 26 


Cat. No. 180. 






J. 

Brit.Mus.3581 A(8), 3. 

375 

XI 

De Beryllo 

gap in text 

159, 34 - 


Published by CRUM, 

376 




160, 4 


Cat. No. 180. 






K. 

ZOEGA, Ca CCLV, 

383 

XI 

De Beryllo 

gap in text 

164, 3-4 


published by him, 

384 

XII 

De Onychio 


165,4 


bid., pp. 610, 611. 



. 



L. 

ZOEGA, Cat. CXXXI, 

385 

XII 

De Onychio 

gap in text 

165, 5 - 


published by 

386 (387) 




176, 30 


Guroi. 

387 (388) 







388 (389) 






' 

389 (390) 






. 

390 (391) 







391 (392) 







392 (393) 






xxxvin EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


The Relation of the Coptic to the other 

Versions, 

It is clear from the list of fragments quoted above that 
somewhat less than a quarter of the text of Epiphanius' 
tractate has come down to us in the Coptic version. It is 
likewise obvious that the order in our present manuscript 
in any case differed from that of the Georgian and Armenian, 
and probably also from that of the Latin. The discussion 
of the enumerations of the tribes in the Coptic appears from 
the pagination in the manuscript to have been inserted 
between the section dealing with the description of the stones 
and that which expounds their allegorical interpretation. 
The Coptic does not seem to have preserved the primal order 
of sections, as the newly discovered Armenian version holds 
to the order found in the other translations. 

The Sahidic translator obviously had before him the 
complete text of the tractate. He translated steadily and 
fairly faithfully until he came across passages of unusual 
difficulty, where he made out what he could of the text. 
Collation with the Georgian text shows that the Greek manu- 
script which the Sahidic translator had before him was in 
general fairly close to the one at the disposal of the Latin 
interpreter. A comparison of the variant readings both of 
the Latin and of the Coptic with regard to the Georgian 
shows this clearly. There is a fair amount of interpolation 
in the Georgian presumably accretions during the Armenian 
stage of the tradition, which are wholly absent from the 
earlier Latin and Coptic translation. Greek syntax and 
constructions still shimmer through in these versions. They 
agree particularly in the concrete and descriptive passages ; 
where bits of allegorical interpretation have been intercalated 
among these by the translator, the kinship between Latin 
and Coptic renderings is by no means so close. 

The majority of divergent renderings are to be found in 
the section treating of the allegorical interpretation of the 
gems. Here the Latin deserts us and we have only the Georgian, 
for the surviving sections, of the Armenian happen not 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xxxix 

to coincide with any of the Coptic. It would appear that the 
Greek text proper in these portions- of the tractate was much 
less lucid, and that the Oriental translators were hard put 
to it to extract any coherent meaning from Epiphanius' 
lucubrations; accordingly they gave freer play to their 
imagination. Only detailed investigation and careful weigh- 
ing of each individual passage will enable us to decide to 
which version we should give the preference in. any given 
reading. 


10. THE ARMENIAN FRAGMENTS AND EPITOMES. 

Through a reference in the useful compilation of Father G. 
Zarbhanalean (1) I became aware of the fact that some 
Armenian texts of this tractate were in existence. From Father 
G. B. Aucher of the Mkhit'arist brotherhood in Venice I learn- 
ed that the MSS. in question were in the library at San Laz - 
zaro, and had appeared in print in the periodical publica- 
tion of the convent, theBazmavep. Later I was able to obtain 
a photograph of the pages in question. The article (2), which 
is printed under the heading of fltffjiylA y^uuintfiiuiti.pnt.p-^A 
((National Literature , has a sub-title : The Statement of St. 
Epiphanius regarding the names of the precious stones . The 
editor (L. Alishan) (3) says nothing about the MSS except 
that they are two in number : he prefaces the texts, which are 
printed in parallel columns, with a short introductory note 
of a general character. Inasmuch as the text of the Bazmavep 
is not easily accessible, it seemed advisable to reprint the texts 
in this volume together With a translation of my own. While 
in Venice in 1923, I followed up some suggestions which, 
with his unwearied kindness, Pere Paul Peeters had carefully 
worked out for me through a perusal of the second part of 
Sargisean's catalogue (4), and was able to lay my hand on 
the MS. from which Epitome B had been printed and also to 
discover a new epitome unrelated to either published version. 

While in Jerusalem on the same jburney, I discovered at 
the Armenian Convent of St. James a sizeable fragment of 
the unabridged text of the Armenian version of the tractate 
itself. Inasmuch as the fragment comes from that part of the 
text which is otherwise preserved complete only in Georgian, 


(1) ir""fci//^iii/uiif 1/rti luijng ftiupq.ifui1inLfiHiuilig t Hjitibutfili 1887, 

p. 202. 

(2) purqifei^ig X (1856), pp. 46-50. 

(3) The publication is anonymous : Father Aucher informed me 
of the author's name. 

(4) P ]}wpq.putiiub. \fuijp $rtLgujl{ luijbptfi ^hn'Uuiq.pui 

plj, 2 vv., Venice 1914. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES XLI 

and is merely entitled On the Prophet Daniel , it could not 
have been identified without knowledge of the Georgian. 
Another epitome also turned up which seemed to me to be 
closely related to the new text from Venice. On my return 
journey I passed through Venice again and was able to 
accomplish the following results : 1) the MS. of epitome B 
was collated ; 2) the MS. of Epitome A was found and colla- 
ted ; 3) the text of the newly-discovered Venetian epitome 
was copied ; 4) a new fragment of the complete text was 
found and copied, which filled up a minute portion of the 
second lacuna in the Georgian text. 

This last text chanced to be a modern copy of a Paris MS. 
which I also collated. Upon investigating the new epitome 
discovered at Venice, it proved to have been copied from a ve- 
ry corrupt archetype, and that a complete copy of the Jeru- 
salem MS. was needed. This, unfortunately, I was not then 
able to obtain. Other Venice texts which appeared from 
Sargisean's catalogue to perhaps form part of our tractate 
proved on investigation to be false leads. 

The Armenian tradition, then, is represented in the present 
book by the following texts : 1) three epitomes, covering the 
second part of the tractate which deals with the description 
of the gems ; 2) two fragments treating of the allegorical 
interpretation of the stones and either directly derived from, 
or at least showing the use of, the complete text. 

1) The epitomes vary in extent and content, and are all 
independent of one another. Of the two published by Alishan, 
that in the right-hand column (here termed B) is much fuller 
and more correct than that on the left-hand side (A). The 
epitomist of A took matters very easily, much as Anastasius 
Sinaita had done, noting the main hue, the chief property, and 
the provenance of each stone. 

Epitome B, however, contains about as much material as 
the first Greek Epitome. The two are independent of one an- 
other, inasmuch as each contains statements which the other 
lacks. Both A and B of the Armenian contain a paragraph 
(in A at the beginning, in B at the end) enumerating the names 
of the patriarchs and the stones assigned to - them, similar 


XLII EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

' 

to the data which have been handed down in Greek MSS. (1), 
though there it would seem separately. . 

Epitome A was published by Alishan from MS. Ven. 
Mekh. ($pi p-fiL) 1537 If ?.', a late Sammelhandschrift of the 
18th century, written in notragir. The text is found therein 
on pp. 179-180. A collation brought to light no variants of any 
importance : there are some minor orthographical points and 
one gloss in a later hand which Alishan rightly excluded. Epi- 
tome B wa sprinted from MS. B 248 Sargiseann^n^/r fl') 
which is exhaustively described in the Catalogue (2). The text 
stands on pp. 372-377,which are bound in the wrong order : pp. 
372-3 should follow pp. 375-7. Here again the collation brought 
to light only two corrections of. any importance: yJuip^niHn^n^ 
in place of JjiTuip-nA^n^ (3), and after IfSilruij the MS. adds fr 
jiMAmfiq. u,l T , L liu (4). Both MSS are late in date, and the or- 
thography is very wild. It has not seemed advisable to 
correct it, except in a few cases where obvious Armenian 
scribal errors make pure nonsense. In one or two instances 
the errors evidently go back beyond the Armenian arche- 
type, A list is subjoined of words which violate the rules of 
classical Armenian orthography, or in which A and B evince 
some inconsistency : 

Orthographic points. Final j omitted : Q 
o in place of fjruoifi (corr.) : JJ*ou^u 


for tut 3-fifiuAfrifjnjiit for Irl uptfb.l-lr for 

i- for HL : tup&i-fa : alternation between i and j_ : 

pah I i^firf.fifin'b Jlri.fi % Qlri-fi ; 'frlrififtliu^fiJ* : ''frlrififJ-M 

Alternation of dentals ; p- for m and 7- ; u* for q. : 9* 

) fd>tfuujpp- ; of gutturals, if- for 

and trqnLblpi ; of labials, p. f Or U[ '. 

Variation in forms J [^"k and ijrum, ; ^iffinL.fuin and tjJ* 

and tuiflr-iuutnh ; ^nLjtu and 


(1) Cf. MIGNE, P.G., 43, 301-304 Tleqi TOV addpavtos U&ov. 

(2) Cf. U/u/i^/n/fcuii,, i. c . t pt. II, cols. 683-698. 

(3) Text, p. 200, 1. 27. 

(4) Text, p. 210, 1. 17. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES XLIII 
. Late forms : trLtruitt; ut^; uM/i/rr* Gram- 


mar : 

The question now arises as to the language from which these 

texts are derived. It is clear that they cannot have descended 

from the Greek epitomes in the form in which the latter are 

now found. Both the Armenian and the Greek contain state- 

ments lacking in the other, but attested by one or all of the 

remaining versions. Accordingly either 1) we have Armenian 

translations of various and diverse Greek epitomes : or 2) 

there lie before us a series of independent abridgements of the 

original Armenian version. It is impossible to give a definite 

answer to the problem, but the balance of probability inclines 

toward the second alternative. In the first place the large 

variation observable within the Armenian texts themselves 

involves serious difficulties, should we seek to postulate a 

separate Greek original for each of them. Furthermore, as 

we shall see below (2)j internal evidence within the Georgian 

text itself makes it necessary to assume that an Armenian 

archetype existed and, indeed,portions of this have come down 

to us. In the second place, no specific evidence in the ex- 

tant Armenian fragments points towards an immediate 

Greek ancestor, while there is some testimony to a Syriac 

archetype. This leads us to reject the first, and to adopt the 

second, possibility, since the divergence between the epitomes 

is in no place so cardinal as to prevent the assumption that 

they represent impoverished descendants of the original Ar- 

menian translation. 

One of the corruptions in this text tends to confirm this 
supposition. The variant forms of the name Thermodon in 
the Armenian ffrnptj-nJI/tiUinu T'orgomentos : ^^fiJn^t[.n u 
Termondos show the confusion between ^ g and ij- d which 
distinguishes the Georgian 079685505650031) T'ermagondos. 


(1) The majority of these points are to be found in Middle 
Armenian mss. in general, and are not specifically characteristic of 
any one dialect. See in general J. KARST, Grammatik der kilikisch- 
armenischen Sprache, Strassburg, 1900. 

(2) See 20 ff . 


XLIV EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

In addition certain of the Georgian expressions go back to the 
Armenian forms with which we meet in the text of the epi- 

tomes : 6. g., 3)fo6g5;> 0<J865 = 


653605300 : nL^^Lfi&r^ (confirming the emendation), 
etc. 

As apparent Syriasms in the Armenian text the following 
points may be noted (1) : 

1) ^^uuiJfiutnii js clearly the Syriac form ^o.\ .*?vi-'*' 
of the Greek e^dfjurov, velvet, samite. , 

2) l^nql/iinj while possibly representing the Greek xdMaiva 
is more likely to be the Syriac pciLwik blue. 

3) uou, as Pere Peeters points out.is probably the frustum of 
the (old Persian) word raa.-^a>oja0 red, purple, as the Geor- 
gian ^oooggoo and the Latin rufae (11. cc.) show. 

The next text to claim our attention is the Venetian epitome. 
The text is published from the exceedingly corrupt Venetian 
MS. (4^ {("-) 828 JJJf, to which, as I have mentioned above, 
my attention was called by Father G.B. Aucher.lt is a Sammel- 
handschrift of moderate dimensions on coarse yellowish paper, 
written in one column by a hand of the 17th century. The ar- 
chetype was unfortunately very corrupt and the MS. itself has 
suffered damage, so that the state of the text is deplorable. The 
Jerusalem MS. is far older and better. It bears the number 
1297,and forms a small stout volume in octavo written at Tif- 
lis in the year 1363 ; it appears to belong to the class of works 
known in Armenian as nu^ifinfi^ oskep'orik. The epitom3 is 
to be found on pages iyJ-fL-iyJ-i[!. Unfortunately I had time to 
copy only the section relating to the topaz. The paragraph on 
the sardion, however, belongs to .another version that of Epi- 
tome A, and the variants are included under the apparatus 
criticus there. I have printed the fragment from the Jerusa- 
lem MS. alongside of the Venetian text. 

The actual verbal content of the Venetian epitome is 


(l)For the registration of these I am indebted to the kindness of 
Pere Peeters. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES XLV 

not unlike that of Epitome B, but it includes some data which 
the latter omits, and vice versa. The chief differences, howeyer, 
are two : , 

1) All but one of the stones are attributed to patriarchs, and 
all but one to an apostle as well. Both, of these characteristics 
are clearly secondary, as none of the other versions contain 
anything of the sort. The list of the apostles is as follows : 

1) Sardion : Philip 7) Ligure : James 

2) Topaz : Matthew 8) Agate : Thaddaeus 

3) Emerald : John 9) Amethyst : Simon 

4) Carbuncle : Andrew 10) Chrysolith : Bartholomew 

5) Sapphire : Paul 11) Beryl : 

6) Jasper : Peter 12) Onyx : Matathias 

2) The list of the patriarchs has become disordered : after 
the first five as in the other versions, we have : 

6) Jasper : Gad 9) Amethyst : Zebulon 

7) Ligure : Asher 10) Chrysolith : Joseph 

8) Agate : Issachar 11) Beryl : 

12) Onyx : Naphtali 

that is, Naphtali has been displaced from the sixth to the 
twelfth place, and each of the other patriarchs is according- 
ly one ahead of his true station. In addition to this the first 
paragraph of the Venetian MS. is badly disordered, the de- 
scription of Philip being clumsily inserted between two senten- 
ces which deal with the description of the stone. It is clear that 
these statements about the apostles are intercalated from some 
single extraneous source, as the characteristics attributed to 
each of them show traces of the same mould. This source 
proved to be the commentary on the Apocalypse of Andreas 
of Caesarea (s. VI). The first complete translation of this 
tractate into Armenian, according to Conybeare, was by 
Nerses of Lambron (1179) (1), but it may be that an earlier 
translation existed which has since been lost, so that specu- 
lations as to the date of the Epitome cannot be certain. 
Vulgarisms are fewer in Ep. Ven. than in A or B, and most 


(1) F. C. CotfYfcEARE, The Armenian Version of Revelations, 
London 1904, p. 64. 


XLVI EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

of the errors are due to careless writing. One of the forms 
is interesting as evidencing traces of a Syriac original, ff^nJn^ 
?//npi/Y// Ok'ombnidazi with uncertain vocalization. The ^ 
z is peculiar (1). The other MSS. at Venice proved to contain 
either Hermetic or other materials alien to my inquiry. 

In addition to the above there exist at Echmiadzin two 
copies of one of the epitomes. Little could be inferred about 
them beyond the laconic remarks in Kareneants' catalo- 
gue (2), but during a visit to Echmiadzin in 1930, I inspected 
the MSS. They proved to contain the Epistle to Diodorus fol- 
lowed by an epitome closely akin to the Venetian epitome B. 

2) The other two fragments published below are of a dif- 
ferent type. They come from the section dealing with the alle- 
gorical interpretation of the stones. The first of these is con- 
tained in the Vatican MS. mentioned below, but the second 
is not. 

The first fragment comes from the section dealing with the 
ligure and is headed in the MSS.: Epiphanius on the Prophet 
Daniel. Two MSS. of this fragment are preserved at Jerusalem : 
the first, No. 1332 (a. 1260), a small stout codex on heavy 
grayish Oriental paper, is written in small, ungraceful, but 
clear bolorgir in one column. The text occurs on pages /^.-</Zr 
and is perfectly legible, apart from two or three words. The 
orthography is good, if we except one or two forms like f^^-t-g 
and a few scribal errors. The second codex, No. 69 (a. 1730), 
is a large and late folio MS. in two columns on white paper, 
evidently a copy of the first codex. I have accordingly print- 
ed the. text as it stands in MS. No. 1332 from a copy made 
for me by Vardapet K. Israelean, to whose kindness I am 
much indebted. 

Comparison of the text with the Georgian shows that we have 
before us not a direct excerpt from the original Armenian 
translation, but that some one has combined sections of the Ar- 
menian translation (which parallels the Georgian .very closely) 
with extraneous matter, perhaps of his own composition, with 
edifying intent. Unfortunately one of these divagations from 


(1) Can this in anyway be due to Georgian influence ? 

(2) No.'s 1630, section 17 and 1637, section 10. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES XLVII 

the original occurs just where the first lacuna in the Georgian 
text supervenes. We apparently have an example of a similar 
conflate homily within the Shatberd codex itself. The trac- 
tate which follows the Physiologus, whose title has been erased, 
and which has been published by M. Djanashvili (1) under 
the title of l^b^^c} ^0360 Lehrbuch, was identified by N. 
Marr (2) as a bit of Epiphanius' nsql /ueTQcovxal araO/Li&v. A 
recent study by S.Qaukhc'ashvili (3) has shown, however, that 
while Epiphanius' work was indeed drawn upon by the author, 
much of the text is not Epiphanian at all. One considerable 
extract, at least, is taken from the scholia to Dionysius 
Thrax's Ti%vv] .Tea/^cmw) (4). I shall point out below that 
several similar essays have come down to us under the name 
of Ananias of Shirak. 

The second fragment, previously unknown, was copied 
by me from the Venice MS. N. 210 Sargisean (a. 1824), 
p. 1 (5). It contains a! note to the effect that it was 
copied from the Paris MS. Bib. Nat. Fonds Arme- 
nien N. 44 (now 110) (6). The collation of my copy with 
the original in Paris brought to light only one correction -of 
serious importance. The MS. is a fine folio on parchment in 
three volumes written in 12th century capitals (ardzanagir) 
The script closely resembles that of the MS. of Timothy 
Ailouros at Echmiadzin (7). The fragment is entitled in the 
MS. : The blessed Epiphanius the Cypriote on the Eleventh 
Gem, that is, on Joseph and the Providence of the. Lord . 
-The text is akin to the Georgian. The last line preserved runs 


(1) 3. ^6^30^0, 3fc)foj^5 8g- IX-X ^a$<g6ot^,$@o^ot>o 1891. 

(2) H. Mapp-B, BBS. Bpein. IX, (1902), pp. 464-66. 

(3)K yigtil^osino: 96$5a6gool> 36g6gjmoL l^^cq ^0560, Bulle- 
tin de I'Universite gtorgienne de Tiflis III (1923), pp. 178-185. 

(4) Ibid., p. 183-84. 

(5) SA .GISEAN, I.e., II, cols. 189-200. 

(6) F. MACLER, Catalogue des mss. armlniens et gdorgiens de la 
Bibliothtque Nationale (Paris 1908), p. 48 ff. 

(7) Cf. the plate given in Timotheos Aelurus des Patriarchen von 
Alexandrien, Widerlegung der auf der Synode zu Chaleedon festge- 

setzten Lehre herausgegeben von... Karapet Ter-M6kerttchian 

und... Erwand Ter-Minassiantz, Leipzig (Hinrichs) 1908, after p. 


IX* 


XLVIII EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

over into the second lacuna of .the Georgian text, but unfor- 
tunately goes no further. 

After the text and translation had been entirely printed 
off, the catalogue of the Armenian manuscripts of the Vat- 
ican Library came into my hands (1). Here I .discovered 
what appeared to be a major fragment of the complete text 
in cod. Borg. armen. 31,- comprising the letter to Diodorus, 
the description of the stones, and the allegorical interpreta- 
tion up to the agate = Asher). Through the kindness of 
Monsignor E. Tisserant, I obtained a photostat of the leaves 
in question, and my supposition proved to be correct. 

The codex contains a rather diverse series of tractates. 
Our text occupies ff. 191^-220^. The text begins : m3, 

fiiTriLtP rjiiuutni-UJiLuiiih It. ^utnLmLajt fyfinif-nnfi* ** To my 

master the honorable and reverend Diodorus... des. 

UiLnLfi }(ui\th uuiLntiLp-jf h ^/fb It h'bnn LuiuiLiuiiufbu 

Because the measure of a day has this significance in the 
Old Testament and the New Testament.... This corresponds 
with the Georgian (text p. 59.27 = p. 151. 2 translation). 
At the end is a note in the outer margin : tjuyu ^fo^ti* / 

n-Ttlrauin u.ffli) 'A utuin Liunfi o-trn fan onltUuil/U It Irii&uin 

111)**- ^utp^glt i-fi^ ijoplfiitkiljii... The rest has been trimmed 

off. This, as far as it is understandable, says : This book 
which we have copied up to this point was a very old codex 
and mutilated.... The date of the present copy is saec. xvii. 

The text of the Vatican manuscript is fairly close to the 
Georgian, but with some striking variations both in individual 
readings and also in certain additional materials. In particular 
we find that after the description of the stones, there follows 
a rather lengthy discussion of the reasons which impelled 
the author to take the order of birth among the sons of Jacob 
as determining the assignment of the gems. That these par- 
agraphs had existed had already been asserted by me 


(1) Codices Armeni Bibliothecae Vaticanae Borgiani Vaticani Bar- 
beriniani Chisiani schedis Frederici Cornwallis Conybeare adhibitis 
recensuit Eu.gen.ius Tisserant. Romae MCMXXVII, pp. 56-57. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES XLIX 


on a priori grounds, and it was a source of deep satisfaction 
to see my conjecture confirmed. The order of the new 
Armenian text is likewise additional evidence against the ap- 
parent order of sections in the Coptic. To add a further hun- 
dred pages of text and translation to an already over-large 
book did not .seem feasible, but I hope to publish this text 
separately before long. 

.The substance of what has been determined above may 
be exhibited in the following stemma : 

Syriac 


Armenian 


Georgian 


I 


Arm. Paris 


X (Homilelic x 
Material) 


X (f Andreas 
of Caesared) 


on Joseph 

Arm. Jems, on Ep. B. | Ep. Jer. 
Arm. Vat. Daniel 


Ep. A. 


Ep. Ven. 


The following conclusions are reasonably certain : 1) all 
the Armenian texts go back to the same original version, 
which also lies at the base of the Georgian. One or two of the 
fragments have been contaminated with extraneous matter, 
notably the fragment on Daniel and the Venetian and Jerusa- 
lem epitomes. 2) The Daniel and the Joseph fragments show 
that the full form of the text, as we have it in the Georgian 
and in part in the Coptic, existed in Armenian, and a con- 
siderable portion of the complete tractate is extant in the 
Vatican manuscript. 3) The Armenian texts contain distinct 
traces of a Syriac archetype, thus confirming the hypothes- 
is which certain indications in the Georgian had led us to 
form, namely, that the ultimate ancestor of the Georgian 
and of the Armenian was a Syriac text. 


THE GEORGIAN TRANSLATION. 


11. THE TEXTUAL TRADITION. 

The textual tradition of the Georgian translation is simple. 
It goes back to a single manuscript of high antiquity, which 
is still extant and from which all other known copies have 
been derived, directly or indirectly. The problem of editing 
is thus simplified, since the subsidiary tradition can be 
neglected ; but on the other hand the faults in the MS.have to 
be corrected on internal grounds or else to be left untouched, 
while gaps can be filled only by conjecture or by a fresh 
translation on the ground of some other version. 


12. THE SHATBERD MANUSCRIPT. 

The manuscript is the celebrated Shatberd codex (1), per- 
haps the most valuable single theological MS. we have in 
Georgian, and indubitably the first from the point of view of 
the importance of its contents. The history of the codex is 
as follows : 


(1) The older literature on this celebrated ms. is adequately 
though somewhat unsystematically summarized by E. S. TAQAISH- 
VILI in his Onncame rpysHHCKHXT. pyKonncefl BH6^ioxeKii OSmecisa 
PacpocxpaHema FpaMOTHocTH cpe^H rpysHHT., T. 2, pp. 40 ff . =C6opHHK'B 
MaTepia-iOBi. #.ifl onHcania MtcTHOciefi H ILieMein. Kaunasa 40 
(1909), p. 36-55. Certain matters are touched upon in greater 
detail by N. MARK in his edition of Hippolytus' Commentary on 
the Song of Songs : HniKK/iHTTb : To^KOBanie Ufecira ItfecHeH (TeKCTH 
H Pa3i>icKam4 no apM/rao-rpysHHCicofi WLuoriH, N III, (Cn6. 1902), 
p. I ff. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LI 


^13. a) DATE. 

It was written about 965-970 A. D. by the scribe loane 
Beray, his uncle Mik'ael and brother Davit' for the famous mo- 
nastery of Shatberd in Tao-Klardjet'ia (1). The conclusion of 
Beray's colophon at the end of the MS. has been lost, and with 
it the exact date of writing, but the scribe has left his name 
at various points here and there through the codex. We are 
enabled to date it by the fact that the same scribe wrote the 
so called Parkhal Gospels (973 A. D.) (2). T'aqaishvili con- 
siders that this MS. should be dated somewhat earlier (3). 


14. b) LATER HISTORY OF THE MANUSCRIPT. 

Of its history in subsequent times almost nothing is known. 
At a later period (about the 15th century according to Marr)(4), 
the quaternions were renumbered with Armenian capital let- 
ters, presumably with a view to binding. 

The codex seems to have lain in some monastic library 
and to have attracted little or no attention until a relatively 
late date. In the early eighteenth century it appears to have 
come into the hands of some one interested in literature, as 
numerous mkhedruli adscriptions, particularly throughout the 
text of Epiphanius, repeat striking and unusual words in the 
margin (5). At the same time at least two partial copies were 
made from it which have come down to us (6). Thereafter it 
disappears once more, to reappear again in 1888, when it 

(1) On Shatberd and the present state of its ruins see H. Mappt, 
JKnTie CB. FpHropifl XaH^ST'iHCKaro (TeKcxn H PaBBicKama, etc. N 
VII), Cn6. 1911, pp. 138 ff. of Appendix. 

(2) On this codex see E. T'aqaishvili, l>^3o ol^cqcoogg^o 1^036035, 
$Qo$>ot>o 1890, pp. 1 XLV ff., and MaiepiajH no apxeojorin KasKaaa XII 
(MocKua 1912), pp. 139-151. 

* (3) L. c., pp. 53-55. 

(4) Mapp-B, HnnoJHTt, p. xix. 

(5) E. g., acqgno^k (text p. 6, 26) and passim. 

(6) See below, p. LV-LVI. 


tn EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

came into the library of the Society for the Extension of 
Literacy among the Georgians , as part of the bequest of 
MSS. made by the Alexieiev-Meskhiev (5jro.gjl>o-8gbfcb3305o) 
family. At Tiflis it was very briefly catalogued by N. Ya. 
Marr, then a student at St. Petersburg, and on the appear- 
ance of this list in print (without the author's knowledge) 
(1), at once attracted considerable attention among local 
scholars in Tiflis. 


15. c) DESCRIPTION OF THE MANUSCRIPT. 

It now bears the number 1141 (383 in Taqaishvili's cata- 
logue). A relatively large literature has grown up concerning 
it, which has been accurately summarized by the Georgian 
scholar E. T'aqaishvili (2). Inasmuch as this description is in 
Russian (Rossica sunt ; non leguntur !), I shall recapitulate it 
here with certain additions derived from repeated and careful 
examination of the original. 

The manuscript forms a stout quarto volume in a solid 
binding, of some antiquity, of brown tooled leather over 
boards. The quaternions, which were originally misplaced, 
have now been sewn in their proper order. The material is 
stout parchment with a yellowish tinge,ruled on the hair side 
with a sharp point pressed with medium force. The page meas- 
ures 18 x24 cm : the text is written in two columns of 27 
lines each. There are extant 288 folia, the remains of the orig- 
inal 304 (38 quaternions of 8 folia each). These are signed 
in the usual Georgian manner with capital (asomV avmli) 
letters at the beginning and end in the centre of the upper 
margin of the first recto and the lower margin of the last 
verso of each quaternion. Fifteen folia have been lost at 
various places in the codex. The pages have also been num- 
bered with Arabic numerals by a modern hand in the upper 
outer corner. 

The script is of two types. Pages 1-255 are written by one 


(1) 033(00^ 1888, No. 's 236,238-9,254 ; cf. N. MARK, HnnojHT-B, 
p. i. . ... . - 

(2) L. c., (note 1). 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LIII 

hand (probably that of loane Beray) in capitals (asom' avruli) 
in dark brown ink. The letters are of the rectangular, not the 
square, type : that is, the vertical axes of the individual let- 
ters are longer than the horizontal. This is not uncommon in 
tenth-century Georgian MSS., while in codices older than that 
period the letters are nearly square in shape. A similar, though 
smaller, hand is to be observed in the interesting psalter, Tif- 
lis Ts.Mus.38 (904A.D.)(1). The beginnings of the paragraphs 
are marked by larger plain letters in the margin. The head- 
ings and occasionally the first lines are written in cinnabar, 
the only ornamentation being roughly drawn asterisks*, a 
characteristic trait of Tao-Klardjet'ian manuscripts (2). The 
adscriptions in this part of the MS. are for the most part in 
pre-Athonite nuskhuri (minuscules). 

The second part of the MS. (pp. 256-588) is written in nus- 
khuriiit a rather large and unformed, though clear, but by no 
means handsome hand. The letters slope somewhat, but are 
rounded at the same time. The hand is clearly that of an- 
other scribe. 

Adscriptions both in Georgian and Armenian, with one 
in Greek, are fairly numerous throughout the MS. (3) 

16. d) CONTENTS OF THE MANUSCRIPT. 

The codex contains the following tractates : 

1) pp. la-121b (formerly 1-96, 145-156, 109-121), Gre- 
gory of Nyssa, On the Creation of Man (UEQI 
Migne, PG. vol. 44, cols. 125-256) (4). 


(1) Gf. 0. 5KopAamfl 5 OracaHie pyKOHHceii IJepKOBHaro Mysea, etc., 
I (Tn*,fflC'B 1903), pp. 29-34 ; Kekelidze says that this ms. was 
written in the year 904, but on what grounds he bases this state- 
ment I do not know(^roo)g)coo gjo^geoi^gfool) ot>$cqeoo5,l $cq6o($go- 
j^o'bo 1923 ^., p. 449). 

(2) A point which was brought to my attention by my friend 
D. P. Gordieiev. 

(3) Quoted by TAQAISHVILI, /. c., p. 38 ff. 

(4) The last chapter of this production is published by M. DJANA- 
SHVILI in his 

1891. 


LIV EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

2) pp. 122a-214a (formerly 122-144, 97-108, 157-214) (1), 
Epiphanius, On the Twelve Stones ((negl rtiv if}' UQcov). 

3) pp. 215a-239b (Basil of Caesarea), The Physiologus (2). 

4) pp. 240-246 [Epiphanius] (title erased) (3). 

5) pp. 247-256, A chronological fragment, possibly Pseudo- 
Epiphanius. 

6) Seven tractates ascribed to Hippolytus : 

(a) pp. 256-284 (4), Commentary on the Blessings of 

Moses on the Twelve Tribes. 

(b) pp. 284-314 (5), Commentary on the Blessings of 

Jacob on the Twelve Patriarchs. 

(c) pp. 314-327 (6), Commentary on David and Goliath. 

(d) pp. 327-357 (7), Commentary on the Song of Songs. 

(e) pp. 357-390 (8), On the End of the World, on 

Christ and Antichrist. 

(f) pp. 390-410 (9), On Faith. 

(g) pp. 410-433 (10), On the Form of the Covenant. 

7) pp. 434-500 (11), The Conversion of Georgia (life of St. 
Nino). 

(1) Edited below, pp. 3-96. 

(2) Edited by N.MARR, mioJiOTT>: ApMano-rpysHHCKifi H3B04 r b, Cn6. 
1904(TeKCTBi H PastiCKamfl no apMano-rpyaHHCKOH wno.i0riH, t.VI). 

(3) Edited by 6. ^65830^0, ^jMooogjmo 8^9(0^0^ 8g-ix-x 1>5- 
g,3)6olw>, 5g3og?ot>o 1891, pp. 118-136, but see above, 10. 

(4) German translation by G. N. BONWETSCH, TU (1904), xxvi. 
1 a (N. F. 11), pp. 1-46. 

(5) German translation by G. N. BONWETSCH, TU, ibid., pp. 47- 
78 : Greek text edited by C. DIBOUNIOTIS and N. BEIS, TU, 3 Reihe, 
Bd. viii (1911), Heft 1. 

(6) German translation by G. N. BONWETSCH, TU, ibid., pp. 74- 
93. 

(7) Edited with Russian translation and introduction by N.MARR 
(cf . page LI, note 1) ; German translation of Marr's Russian ver- 
sion by G. N. BONWETSCH, TU, N. F. vm, 2-3 (1902). 

(8) Greek text edited by G. N. BONWETSCH and H. ACHELIS, 
Hippolytus (Berl. Ed.) Bd. 1,2, p. 1 ff. 

(9) Not by Hippolytus ; German translation by G.N. BONWETSCH 
TU, 3 Reihe, I, 1 (xxxi, 1). 

(10) Actually by Aphraates : see G.N. BONWETSCH, TU, 1. c., pp. 
3-4. 

(11) First imperfectly edited by E, T'AQ AISHVILI, l>68o ot 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LV 

8) pp. 500-515 (1), The Life of St. Jacob of Nisibis. 

9) pp. 515-581 (2), Epiphahius of Salamis, Commentary 
on the Psalms, translated into Georgian from the Armenian by 
Da5'a. 

t 

17. THE CONDITION OF THE TEXT. 

The text of our tractate has not come down to us unblem- 
ished., Two leaves, one between p.!70b and 171 a, and also one 
between p.!90b and 191a, were torn out at an early date. Fur- 
thermore p. 157 and parts of p. 159, as well as individual words 
here and there, have suffered serious injury in the course of 
centuries. But patience and holding the MS. sidewise against 
the light,enabled me to work out all the passages in question, 
since the parchment has in these cases fortunately been eaten 
by the ink. Only scattered letters here and there evaded 
my scrutiny, and these can be restored from the context 
with almost absolute certainty. In one or two other passages 
the greasy condition of the parchment permits the ink to 
shine through from the other side, but with one exception 
these are decipherable. Erasures and alterations are not in- 
frequent, but are all by the hand of the scribe. Otherwise 
the MS. is well-preserved, and can be read with reasonable 
ease (3). 

18. OTHER MSS. OF THE TRACTATE. 

Three other copies of our text are known to me : 

1) Tiflis Ts. Mus. 165 (17th-18th cent.), pp. 454-537(4) ; 


>o 1890, p. 1 f. Corrections of the text by M. DJA- 
NASHVILI, 55535553069, $90K?ot>o 1891. English translation of a frag- 
ment by M. and T.WAKDROP, Studia Biblica V, 1(1900), pp. 61-65. 
Definitive edition by E. T'AQAISHVILI in his Catalogue (cf. p. LI, 
note 1) II, pp. 734 ff. = CSopnHK'B MaTepia-iOBi,, etc. 41 (1910), 
pp. 48-96 ; 42 (1911), pp. 1-5 . 
. (1) BHO. 407. 

(2) Data's colophon ap. E. T'AQAISHVILI, Onncame etc., II, 
44-47 = C6opHHK r b MaTepia.iOB'B, etc. 40 (1909), pp. 44-47. 

(3) This may be gathered from the critical notes at the foot of 
the Georgian text. 

(4) Cf . 0. JKopAamfl, QjracaHie pyKoimceft TwMHccKaro 


LVI EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

2) Tiflis Ts. Mus. 6 (a. 1821), pp, 83-108 (1) ; 

3) Tiflis Soc. Hist, and Ethnog. 903 (s. 18 fin.) if. l r -60v. 

Each of them exhibits the above-mentioned lacunae, and 
hence they have no independent value for the textual tradi- 
tion. 


19. g) DJANASHVILI'S EDITION OF THE TEXT. 

-A portion of our text was printed some twenty-five years 
ago by the curator of the Ecclesiastical Museum in Tiflis, 
Mose Djanashvili, in the Sbornik materialov dlya opisaniyd 
miestnostei i piemen Kavkaza, vol. XXIV, (1898), pp. 1-72. 
He published in Georgian with a Russian translation the 
introductory letter of Epiphanius to Diodorus and the de- 
scription of the stones, and added the end of the tractate as a 
specimen of the remainder, together with some grammatical 
and other comments(2). This creditable publication(3), though 
reviewed in the Vizantii'skii Vremennik(5), and consequently 
noted in the Byzantinische Zeitschrift (6), escaped the attent- 
ion of Western European patrologists, including even Bar- 
denhewer : 0. von Lemm brought it to the knowledge of 
scholars, as we mentioned above ( 9.). 

A collation twice made of the text of Djanashvili's edition 
with that of the MS. has made it possible for me to check its 
correctness.The first editor performed his task with fair accur- 
acy, although a certain number of minor errors have crept 
into the text ; some of them probably belong to the printer. 
They may be classified as follows : 


I, pp.171-172 : a more detailed description ap. S. QAUKH- 
Georgi Monachi Chronicon, Tiflis, 1920, pp. x-xvi. 

(1) 5Kop4amfl, I. c., pp. 7-8. 

(2) Pp. 6-7 = pp. 95, 26-96, 18 of our edition. 

(3) See the review of N. MARR, Viz. Vrem. 9 (1902), pp. 464-470. 

(4) On the text see below, 19. 

(5) See note 3. 

(6) BZ 12 (1903), p. 665. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LVII 


A) Modern orthography (usually in the scriptio plena of 
words sub signo contractions). 


Djanashvili 
16, 14 cf>3ol>|5 
16, 19 
18, 8 
20,4 

20, 9 803338550^3 
20, 12 0030!* 
22, 13 14 6^3056 
22, 23 36^35 
32, 6-7 s56i>jo30(3ol) 
32, 8 


34, 15 039^0)5 
34, 21 
44, 14 398.06^ 
44, 18 8o3fo5go 
48,7 3330800^309 


MS. 

3, 18 

3, 26 

4, 8 

5, 11 

5, 19-20 

5, 24 oo$b 

6, 25 

7, 9 

12,2055655056013 
12, 22 

12, 34 

13, 34 033(6^075 

14, 8 
19, 22 
19, 28 
21,22993080)^3 


B) Incorrect readings of words correct in the MS. 


16, 6, 23 ; 18, 30 ^035^5 3, 7, 

16, 16 03^90000 3, 22 

18, 28 5(0^508555 5, 1 

22, 16 ^66;><!o<>1>j 6, 28 

22,17605503650 7,2 

28, 21 3oooo}3o5l>5 10, 20 

30, 10 Soe6^5So6 11, 12 

32, 3-4 653^36^520 (scripsi) 12, 15 

32, 12 o3o}336ol> (scripsi) 12, 31 

38, 29-30 ^3360036 16, 24 

40, 20 05503^5 17, 18 

42, 13 60005635 (misprint) 18, 8 

44, 25 0^658360^03^ 20, 5 

46, 24 3o33ol> 21, "10 


31; 5, 3 

gb^Soo) 

35650538555 

S^gBjftRoo 

6035053650 


030333606 


0555^5 
300056^5 
3^658360^031)1. 
30333^ 


C) Incorrect readings of the MS. tacitly corrected. 

18, 14 8o3<3ci)6ol>5 8ob 4, 18 8o36fo)6ob5b 8ol> 

18, 18 65^ 561> 4, 22 65^ 56!) 


LVIII EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


24, 24 36)J(33).5?co5 8, 12 -005 non legitur 

28, 33 8036^531. 10, 23 paene evanidum 

30, 11 66 11, 14 66 

32, 12 8ol> 12, 13 8 a b 

40, 15 bo)68ooo5 17, 11 l>og)8oo>5 

44, 28 60383506 o 83 20, 8 660 83 sine signo con 

tractionis 

D) Other errors. 

24, 12 8o56coo33l> 7, 27 80560003331) 

34, 2 56ob6 13, 17 

46, 12 1^035535 20, 25 

E) Omissions. 

20, 24 om. 6, 5-6 8^>6^gl)g5g^6o >go o 

5oob5 56 

38,27 om. 16, 19-20 35 535^5 


40, 7 om. 16, 34 505 bfc)5a 5e5b 603835"- 

1)5 


I have not taken account here of the cases where Djanashvili 
followed or diverged from the MS. where it varies in the use 
of the letter 6 eg, since these are covered fully below in the 
section dealing with orthography. 

Inasmuch as my original copy of this part of the text 
was made from Djanashvili's edition and later recollated by 
me with the MS., I feel reasonably certain that where the 
copies show a difference, my own is probably correct. In one 
or two instances the reading is a matter of indifference. The 
following cases seem to be certain : 

16, 18 )3)6oo>o 1, 25 

18, 26 gSo^So'bi 4, 33 

20, 2 80383 db<g>o 5, 9 8038365^3 (verb !) 

20, 7 050 5, 16 353 : pronoun deman- 

ded by second person 

20, 18 050 cr>)55^o 5, 33 a))55*>o 030 

20, 20 356^0^0360 * 5, 35 356^3500360 

22, 13 000355500 6, 25 00355" 

24, 22, 23-4 j86oV 8, 10-11, 12 3^86oli 

26, 5 65? j>66 8, 27-8 6^6 566 (probably 

a lacuna) 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES ux 

26, 25 353035^0 9, 22 3^03350 

28, 5 50565005556033560)5 9, 34 

34,3 fto @ 13, 17 

42, 19 3^3a6gb5^b5 (mis- 18, 25 

print) 

48, 2 85li 21, 15 8oli 

48, 4 3030336 21, 18 330336 

Cases where either reading may be the acceptable one : 

.26,23-8*<R. 9, 19 3^5 

38, 29-30 e?5o56oo36 16, 24 9^5656036 

In the following passages my copy is presumably at fault, 
and Djanashvili's reading has accordingly been inserted in 
the text : 

18, 14 938,33?? 4, 16 

34, 24 800) 14, 12 

38, 8 33606036 15, 27 5^58560036 

42, 12 905^36650 18 app. cr. po5M566co 

This reading kerinon] lygyrion is the only one of major im- 
portance : the evidence of the Latin text shows that the error 
is undoubtedly mine. 

This list of textual errors and of orthographical slips in 
Djanashvili's edition is long, but for the most part they are 
of minor importance. In the Russian translation, which is 
in general highly commendable in view of the difficulties 
already referred to, some amusing slips are to be observed. 
The word 55008036 bat'mon (gr. pqOpfa step) was taken to 

be the Persian ^\^ batman, a measure of weight ; the 
336)2ol>5 155051)51)5 the foam of the sea, became the sea of 
Peru and so forth. Great stress should not be -laid on such 
errors ; a more serious fault is the translator's tendency to 
gloss over difficulties by paraphrasing his text. It is but fair, 
however, to acknowledge with gratitude that the Russian 
rendering of Djanashvili has been of great assistance in 
preparing the translation now published (1). 

(1) Since my translation was printed off, Dr. R. BLECHSTEINER 
has published a translation of Djanashvili's text in the Jahrbuch 
der oesterreichischen Leogesellschaft 1930, pp. 232-270, This pub- 
lication is unfortunately not accessible to me, 


LX EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


20. THE ORIGIN OF THE GEORGIAN TRANSLATION. 

* . 

The question now arises: from what language was the 
Georgian version translated ? After a careful examination 
of all the evidence, I have come to the conclusion that the 
Georgian text was translated from the Armenian, and not 
directly from Greek or from Syriac. The grounds leading 
to this decision are partly general in character, in part de- 
duced from internal criteria in the Georgian. The other 
works preserved in the same MS> furnish valuable parallels : 
the loan-words in the Georgian text also throw light on the 
matter, while certain errors and peculiarities in the Georgian 
translation can only be explained by postulating an Armen- 
ian substratum. 


21. THE EVIDENCE OF THE OTHER WORKS IN 

THE MANUSCRIPT. 

a) In the first place, almost all the other texts in the MS. can 
be proved to be translations from the Armenian. This has 
been definitely shown by N. Ya. Marr for 1) the Physiologus(l) 
and 2) the tractates of Hippolytus (2) ; the commentary 
of Epiphanius on the Psalms is avowedly a translation from 
the Armenian (3). The fragment of Epiphanius de mensuris 
et ponderibus is too small to enable us definitely to ascertain 
its origin, but the fact that the heading in the codex has 
been carefully erased looks suspicious (4). The tractate of 
Gregory of Nyssa, On the creation of man, is probably a trans- 


(1) H. Mapp-L, t&iraio.ior'L : ApmeHO-rpysHHCKiH HSBOAT. (TeKcxti H 
PasHCKama T.6) Cn6. 1906. 

(2) H. Mapp-L, Hnno.iHT'B: To-iKOBame K*CHH fltcneH (TeKcxti H 
PasudcamA T. 3) Cn6. 1902. 

(3) See above, p. LV note 2. 

(4) For a similar instance in an Athos Ms., see N. MARK, Zapiski 
Vostotnago Otdeleniya XII (1900), pp. 69-80, where a statement 
that the vita in question was a translation from the Armenian was 
erasepr 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXI 

lation from the Armenian, since it varies decidedly from the 
text of Giorgi Mt'acmideli, which was translated directly 
from the Greek (1). Thus of all the other tractates in the 
MS. the only one clearly of non- Armenian origin is that on the 
Conversion of Georgia ; hence the natural presumption that 
Epiphanius' tractate was also translated from the Armenian. 
This presumption is confirmed by certain stylistic peculiar- 
ities of the text. We should note, however, that it is no easy 
task to ascertain the original idiom from which a translation 
is made. If the work has been well done, it may easily be that 
no certain traces whatsoever of the underlying tongue will 
be left. Furthermore, the presence of Armenian words in 
the Georgian text is not in itself valid evidence for an Armen- 
ian original : a large number of words of Armenian extraction, 
for which native synonyms existed, were current in old Geor- 
gian and occur in texts which are either original productions 
or else translated from tongues other than Armenian. The 
stylistic peculiarities referred to may be summarized as 
follows : . 

22. b) ARMENIAN LOAN WORDS IN THE TEXT. 

A fair number of Armenian words occur in the text, but 
not many outside the ordinary run of their kind, -except pos- 
sibly Sg^o, peti chief (57, 33); -Arm. ^Inn, and 

stakhSi (79, 4) stacte , through the Armenian form 
ii ; a list of loan words is subjoined. 

1) 5565158 Abraham (68, 32 ; 70, 29 etc.) : from Armenian 

^uiir with internal ^h. Cf . Hiibschmann, Armenische 
Grammatik,p. 290. 

2) 5356530 agaraki (15, 4), field (a cultivated field as 
distinguished from 395^0 veil) ; Arm. /^/^fi/^ agarak. Deriv- 
ation ? 

3) 5 c b65g6o (2) aznauri (77, 10) noble ; derivative from 
Arm. uutU mifn. azn, azniv noble . 


(4) So my friend Grigol T'ut'beridze informed me. 
(2) The -uri termination is a Georgian addition. 


LXII EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

4) 53550, 53550, 53556, (see index for references) akad, 
akati, akatey, agate ; Arm. la^tam, akat. Not from 
the Greek form a%&tv\c, as Hiibschmann wishes to make 
out (p. 339), since then we should have -j A:*, in place of 3 A:, 
but presumably derived from a Syriac K^nr^*, (though 
such a form, it must be admitted, is not preserved). 
The softening of t to d at the end looks like Pehlevi 
influence ; compare the form o5 )6coo iagundi below, though 

forms like tui^uutfuA^.^ ada.ma.nd, uA^fifiuA^ andriand, ((dia- 
mond , statue (Greek dda^d^, av^Qiaq -dvrot;, cf. 
Hiibschmann, pp. 338, 340) occur ; it may be due to the 
presence of the preceding nasal here. The -6 -ey in akatey is 
not necessarily a sign of Greek influence. 

5) 58356553569650, ampartavanebay (24, 4 ; 42, 29 ; 87, 5) 
pride ; Armenian uiifp.uifuiuuLufu^ ambartavan. The word 
is Iranian (Hiibschmann 178). 

6) 56g5l6g55a, angahrebay (24, 9 10) greed : Armenian 
uttj-ui^^ agah ; the word is used in Georgian in the abstract 
form only : where the -n- in the Georgian form comes from is 
not clear. 

7) 5t>)fr>5l>556o, Asurastani (6,17) ((Assyria, Syria ; 
Arm. IJunplruinufii) Asprestan Syria (Hubschmann 22). 

8) 5160360 Ahroni (4, 18 ;45,2) Aaron . This has been 
influenced by the Syro-Armenian form y^utpnit^ >oir< but 
it is not clear why the seconds a has been apocopated. Cf. 
Hubschmann 290. 

9) 655060, bagini (93, 16) ; Arm. f.ia^.^i bagin altar : 

possibly Iranian, connected with Pehlevi bag God (Hubsch- 
mann 114). 

10) 050)80360 baCmoni (13, 23 25) ; Armenian *//Z*/JA 
bat'mon* from the Greek {3a6fA,6<; (in the Latin texts gradus) 
step ; Djanashvili took this to be the Persian word bat' man, 
a measure of weight ! The Georgian form is the same type mor- 
phologically that we have in 603^0360 mok'loni bar be- 
low, and in 60380360 bomoni altar : is it only chance that 
these words are all oxytone (1)? One would be inclined to 

(1) Similar forms are found in Laz : cf. H. Mapp'E, TpaMMaxmca 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXHI 

suspect a Syriac intermediary stage for these term s , but 
fiaOpos or paOfik do not seem to be used in Syriac, and ficopog 
occurs in the form rdteosoa bemosa ; rl*osa, it is true, has 
a plural ^A&.<\sa mokhlln. Furthermore, the borrowing of 
words by Oriental and other languages in the oblique cases 
is not infrequent ; cf. &>&59$oo panashtidi navwxls, and 
b^eoogoo spyridi anvek below, and the treatment of Greek 
-d- stems in Slavic. 

11) 69360 bevri (20,36) myriad (10,000); Armenian 
fif,Lf, biur, but older form /zt/ bevr ; from Pehl. bevar, 
Hiibschmann 121. 

12) 6ogo$o bilci, (31,15 ; 93,8) foul , impure ; 609^96501 
bilcebay (51,22) foulness ; gSo^foaii&icpi/ pure, unsullied 
(negative form of bilci); )6o$c33g65a (38, 33) ubicovebay 
purity, unsulliedness ; Arm. <y/r^ piyc; the negative 
form usually apocopates the I in Georgian. 

13). 6036(7250 boroli (7,9, etc.) bad (morally) ; Arm. ftnpnui 
borot leprous : in view of the semasiological difference it is 
highly doubtful if this word really is borrowed from the Ar- 
menian. See Marr's discussion in Bulletin de V Academic 
russe, 1919, pp. 395 ff. 

14) 5g6g65a bunebay (1, 22, etc) nature ^ 6^)69600^0 bu- 
nebit'i (65, 10 ; 92, 18) natural : derived from Arm. p.nA 
bun nature (Probably from Iranian ; Hiibschmann 123-4). 

15) 65360500 byvrili (6, 3 ; 20, 16, etc.) ; Armenian ^L^rZr^ 
biurey beryl (Hiibschmann 344). The Georgian form prob- 
ably goes back to the Armenian, for it would otherwise be 
hard to explain the -53- -yv- in the initial syllable and the 
lack of the Greek ending -tov, which is preserved in the other 
gem-names of this type. The Syriac has rc^cvi=j 6eruZa and 

K'icvla belura, of which the latter evidently goes back to a 
Pehlevi form (cf. np. ^ belur), and all in turn to the 
Sanskrit vaidhurya. For the uncertain transcription of Ar- 


I'aHCKaro #3BiKa (Maiepia-iM HO M^TlraecKOH *HJOJorifi, T. 2) 
1910, pp. 141, 142, 146, etc. 


LXIV EPIPHANItrs ON THE TWELVE STONES 

menian fit. iv (really iw and pronounced roughly like v, German 
ii), we have the testimony of the Atene graffiti 305609 (1) 
Kiyrie for KVQIS Kyrie, and for i / e in Auslaut in Ar- 
menian, cf . fiuifiulrii Barsey for Greek Baatteios. 

16) flJ^ftoi'bo galatozi (7, 16) stone-cutter ; apparently 
Greek, but through the Armenian ij.ui^uiuinu galatos. 

17) 580^0^5650535 gamoik'andaka (57, 16 ; 78, 6) engrave, 
carve ; Armenian juuA^juli. khandak r Iranian word ; 
Hubschmann 256. The correspondance $ k* =?/ kh is 
peculiar. 

18) gccieo6-56ga>o Gorganet'i (14, 27) Hyrcania . In Ar- 
menian we have two forms ; 1) ^jpljuiii Vrkan (Hubschmann 
86) ; Greek 'Ygxavla, both from old p. Vrkana : 2) 9-"*-/ 1 -' 
tj-.ui'ii Gurgan ap. Sebeos, History of Heraclius from Pehlevi 
Gurgan : Syr. ^Jifli^ (Zeitschrift der deutschen morgen- 

landischen Gesellschaft 43. 414). The Georgian form, as we 
see, is derived from 2) ; -3010 -eVi (gen. pi. + nom.) is the 
usual ending of district names in Georgian, e. g. ^535^9010 
DjavakheVi, etc. 

19) 5^6500 gundi (71, 5 ; 81, 8) company ; Arm. 
gund (Iranian word ; Hubschmann 130-131). 

20) ^liodasz (7, 7, etc.) ; Arm. UMIU das company . 

21) go5l65 S b dah(a)nags (12, 29): Arm. i^^ 
dahanak green (Hubschmann 133) from a Persian word (np. 

L'UIji)- The form here, however, seems to go back to the 
Syriac .^cn.i, or else we may have to do here with a case 
of direct borrowing from the Persian. 

22) 35^560 vacari (5, 11, etc.) merchant')), 1)53556010 
savacroy commerce, market Armenian iftutitun. wacar, 
trader, market from Pehlevi vacar : Hiibschmann 242. 

23) 3g953o vesapi (20, 23) dragon ; Armenian ^fo^ 
vtiap from zd. visapa : Hubschmann 247. 

24) TSSgeoo zmuri (5, 35 ; 8, 16, etc.) emerald . This form 
cannot be directly derived from the Armenian, where we find 


(1) Discovered by myself in the fall of 1019 on the inner wall of 
the church. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXV 

the form qifpm.pitn zemrukht (Hiibschmann 151). All the other 
forms (Greek a/jidgaydog (/*-) : Syr. r^i^reSsatrc : np. zu- 
murrud) evince a final d or t : the origin of the word is un- 
known. I can only tentatively suggest that zmuri goes 
back to some Pehlevi form like that which Noldeke (Persi- 
sche Studien II. p. 44) suggests : izmuburt > izmuvurt> zmu- 
ri (I). A similar difficulty in derivation presents itself 
in the etymology of ^/nt-. zmurs perfume (2). 

25) "BgcDo zet'i'(4, 10, etc.) oil is not Arm. J-bfJ- dzeyt, 
oil , but both are derived from some common source, un- 
doubtedly of Caucasian origin ; cf . Hiibschmann, pp.309-310. 

26) o>5f6 s 356o V argmani (10, 1 8) ; 0)5658563650 (40, 41, 
etc.) t'argmanebay translator ; translate, interpret ; 
Arm. piuft^j/uAut^ t'argmanal. For the variation in 
meaning, cf. the divergent significance of Greek 
eQ^vevrijs. The word comes from the Syrian 
targemana interpreter and ultimately from the Assyrian 
(Hiibschmann 303). 

27) ob )6soo iagundi (16, 30 ; 66, 14) hyacinth, jacinth ; 
Arm. jiulinAij. yakund (also jMufypitfl yakinV) which comes 
through the Syriac and not direct from the Greek vdxivdos, as 
Hiibschmann has it (p. 336). The form 053060)6 iakint'ey 
(6, 2, etc.) comes from the Armenian jiu/iffiifl yakinV. Init- 
ial y- is avoided in Georgian ; cf. o5b5o6o iaspini, jasper , 
0^5050 iuday Judah , etc. (3) In later texts we find the 
Greek form 55306016 tiakint'ey. On the Syriac forms, see 
C. Brockelmann, Zeitschrift der deutschen morgenlandischen 
Gesellschaft 47, 7. For the variation ofu in the final sylla- 
ble, cf . the Slavic (Russian ) HXOHT* yakhont. 

28) o5l>3o6o iaspini (5,36, etc.) jasper ; Arm. juiuu[p(u) 
.yaspi(s). The -6 -n is not improbably an accreted Armenian 
article. The Armenian-Georgian form comes from the Greek 


(1) Gf. the forms given in J. RU^KA, das Steinbuch des ps. Arz's- 
toteles, Heidelberg 1921, pp, 32, 74, 98. 

(2).Gf. HiiBSCHivrANN, s. v. (p. 393). 

(3) Forms with initial a- y- are found sporadically in some of the 
oldest MSS., such as Tiflis Tserk. Mus. MS. 38, a psalter of the year 
904,where we find ago^Q Yuday.This orthography evidently smacked 
too much of the Armenian for the later scribes and was abandoned. 


Lxvt EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


and not from the Semitic, which has > for the medial 
sigma. It is noteworthy that the word was not conceived of 
as a -d- stem. Cf. Hubschmann 366. 

29) 0^9^066 ikedney (59, 34) viper . The word is 
derived through the Syr. K^.T&K' from the Greek B^idw]. It is 
not found in Armenian, where the word ^ U is employed. 
See Marr, Teksty i Razyskaniya 6, p. xxxi. 

30) 05^)630 iataki (17,18) bottom ; Armenian jwutatli ya- 
tak (also tuuttu^ a/o/c).Derivation uncertain(Hubschmann 110). 

31) 353033^0 kapoeti (9, 22 ; 13, 10) onyx stone , trans- 
lating the arvitfn pN in Gen. 2. 12. Arm. ^""Y'?/" 7 kapoyt 
dark-blue : Hubschmann 166 (from Pehlevi kapot) ; the 
origin of the Georgian form is not clear : one would expect 
^5^50 kaputi. 

32) 9^53366 lagyney (4, 12) cruse, jar ; probably from 
Greek Ady^og (or Adywo??) ; cf. Syr. r^ii^ ab eodem. 

33) ^58^560 lampari (36, 6) lamp ; Arm. f^aiTufotfi lam- 
par from Greek AajuTidi; or Aa/unddiov with the characteristic 
Armenian change of dto r (1); cf. ^plruy Hreay : Georgian 
Ig6o5o huriay Jew from KL..TOCO*. 

34) 85655^0^0 margaliti (14, 18 ; 19, 23) : Greek juaQya- 
QLr<r]<; pearl , but it might as easily come through the Armen- 
ian tfuipuMiplua margarit (Hubschmann 363). The second 
6 r is dissimilated, as is frequent in Georgian. 

35) 85(685eoo6o3a marmarinoy (19, 5, etc.) marble from 
Arm. MTtafJutfipn^ marmarion, presumably with insention of 
o i, from the Greek ju,dQjnaQoq ; cf . Hubschmann 364. 

36)8ognocci6 milion (ll,16,etc.)mile ; possibly from Armen- 
ian iTiinii (Hubschmann 369) with raising' of the semivowel 
ft_ e to i, but more probably directly from the Greek ju 

37) 8^r>cQ6o mok'loni (53,29) bar from Greek 

Aog, but probably through the Syriac rdi&o&a ; see above, 
p. LXII (not found in Armenian). 

38) 6530 navi (10, 26, etc.) ship ; Armenian 1nut. naw; 
Hubschmann 201. 


(1) Alishan's Armenian epitome B has the form 
With Cilician m t for d (cf . Hubschmann s. v.). 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXVII 

39) 60^560 nizari (79, 8) pot, porcelain , (probably 
glazed pot ) ; Arm. Wo*^ nlar pot (Iranian word : 
Hiibschmann 203) ; Armenian e in Georgian loan-words 
may give as here i, g e, or ) u, e. g., ^Q^bo (1) kemakhi 
occiput ; Armenian fytfiufujt kmakhk' skull ; 
Sumbat, Armenian yifp.iuui Smbat , etc. 

40) 6j3o nuft" (8, 29) almond ; Armenian 
nSi n$in ; for e = u see the preceding word. 

41) 3^030 pativi (35, 28, etc.) honor ; Armenian 
ufuimfiL pativ. 35$ocal>56o patiosani, honorable, precious 
(cf. Greek rl/itoc) : S^oejbGgS^a patiosnebay, honor, prec- 
iousness . 

42) 3g$o pe# (56, 33) head-, chief-man ; Armenian 
uflrm pet ; on this word see Hiibschmann pp. 229-30, and N. 
Ya. Marr, Zapiski Vostodnago Otdeleniya 5 (1890), p. 286. 
This word is not common in old Georgian texts. 

43) 305^9660 pilendzi (9, 1 2 etc.) copper ; Arm. uf^/ti^ 
pyindz. The word is not Iranian ; see N. Marr, Comptes 
Rendus de 1'Academie des Sciences de Russie, 1925, pp. 
16-17. The usual form is bSo^gGdo spilendzi (9, 3), which 
also occurs here in the text ; for n e = i see above s. v. 
nizari ; for sp p, see the following word. 

44) SO^CQQ piloy (11, 17) elephant ; Armenian $fiq p'iy 

(Hiib schmann 255), Pers. pil, Arab. L> from skr. pllu-. The 

*^ 

usual form in Georgian is bSo^cqii spiloy, which did not 
come directly in any case from the Armenian by the literary 
route, as the l>3 sp == ^ p' shows ; this probably arose from 
the group * 15 *hp by metathesis from eg p ( (i. e., p+h). 

45) 3580 zami (7, 3, etc.) time ; Armenian J^uuT zam 
hour ; Hiibschmann 156. 

46) 65155 Rahab (69, 23 etc. : also efobS Raab 69, 23 
26) ; Armenian form. In Zohrab's Bible we have in Mt. 
1. 5 ^nJrjtutpLUij Hrek'abay (Greek c P^a/5), but in Jos. 2, 1 


(1) This word is given by Sulkhatt Orbeliani, s. v., \vith the mean- 
ing adduced, and occurs in the Passio ss. martyrum Sabbaitarum 
(Tiflis Tserk. Mus. MS. No. 95, s. X) 


LXVIII EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


pui^iup. Rahab . An explanation of the form 
Rahabivs is given below (p. LXXIV). 

47) I>g65o'o6o serabini (30, 32 etc.), seraph from the 
Armenian form upnp.^ srobey, which in its turn goes back 
to the Syriac r<^ia> (Hiibschmann 320). On the e cf. 
above under (39) niZari. 

48) 1)335530 spetaki (8, 2, etc.) white ; Armenian ut^fi- 
wuili spitak ; the word comes from the . Pehlevi spetak 
(Hiibschmann 240), and, as the 9 e shows, we may have to do 
with a direct Persian loan-word here. Also l>ol)5g^)^!@ sis- 
petakey (7, 7, etc.) whiteness . 

49) /b3oT?g6<3o spilendzi ; see above s. v. pilendzi. 

50) b^eoospo spiiridi (41,4) basket . Possibly directly from 
the Greek anvqiq -Idog, but the word exists also in Armenian 
in the form W^L/I/T^. sp'iurid (Hiibschmann 382), where the 
aspirant p' shows the influence of the Syriac rc'juicvA-r^ 

with^ in place of jao, as Greek n was strongly aspirated in 
Syriac (Noldeke, Syrische Grammatik*, p. 10). 

51) !>5oJg6oc{6oa> stik'eronit' (49,2) verse ; Greek 
QO<;: the word is also found in Armenian in the ioTm.u 
uuifiL.glrfinh) uut^fifinii (Hiibschmann 381), and the Georgian 
form is probably derived from it, as the - 036 -on shows. 

52) $56530 tabaki (49, 17) plate, grid ; Armenian uttui^uu^ 
tapak (Iranian word ; Hiibschmann 252). The term is used 
in the Old Testament to translate the Greek tv'iyavov, frying 
pan which also denotes an instrument for torture. For the 
oscillation in Georgian between 5 / 5 pjb, cf. the forms 
35356^0-^5556^0 kaparti / kabarti, quiver , ^53^30-^56330 
capuki I dabuki, youth , etc. 

53) $56^350 tanjvay (31, 26, etc.) to torture ; Armenian 
uiu/itfjr^ tanjel : possibly Iranian (Hiibschmann, p. 251). 

54) 5651300360 tbazioni (5,. 34, etc.) topaz ; Armenian 
ui 0^111 t^nh tpazion (Hiibschmann 385) from Greek rondiov. 
The absence of any epenthetic vowel between the t and b 
is probably to be explained by the fact that the combin- 
ation tb was familiar to the Georgian ear. 

55)3653356530 urakparaki (61,26) flat open place, 
square ; Armenian ^pu/ufiaiteulfhraparak. The variatibn 3 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXIX 

u/I ft and the presence of the medial ^ k in the Georgian form 
are presumably to be explained by the fact that this word 
was borrowed at another period and from another dialect. I 
am not aware of any etymology for the Armenian hraparak, 
but the word would seem from its form to be Persian (not 
listed in Hubschmann). 

56) 0356530 p'anaki (11,28). This word is not given in 
any of the lexicons, but is found in the Adysh Gospels, where 
it represents the Greek (polvig (John 12,13). This rendering 
should be inserted in the translation (p. 110, 1. 5) ; the vocaliz- 
ation a-a points to a Syriac origin. 

57) J5g5jo- fc'aZa/r'z'.(l f 47etc.) city Armenian ^unjiu^ 
k'ayak' ; cf. Hubschmann 318. 

58) JgSeoQBo K'ebroni (69, 27) Hebron . 

59) J65eoo k'nari (48, 11) harp ; Armenian ^**"p k'nar 
from Syr. re*ii^ knara (Hubschmann 319). 

60) ft&WoStakhSi (79, 4) ; Armenian ^"""t"^ Makhsn, Lq. 
the Greek araxrr}. The origin of the Armenian form is not 
clear (Hubschmann 241). The word also occurs in other texts 
in the form Q^TSbo takhsi, which is closer to the Armenian. 
On the assimilation (cf. floQ'oSiSi fear from bo9o* sisi*) see 

0. cjoo^Qodg, b5j56a)3ggno}b b5bg9^8^ooj. 3603. 

1, pp. 1 ff. 

61) & 5 t5)6(!)3C? fakunteli (6 28) beet ; Arm. 
fakuntey. Cf.'N. Marr in Viz. Vrem. 9, p. 468. 

62) 5 5 ? 5 3 falaki (15 ; 11,11) island ; Armenian 
dalak. 

63) ^g385foo^o (eSmariti (1,26, etc.) true; Armen. tijifiu* 
ffiui desmarit ; Hubschmann 373 (Iranian word?) ; see N. 
Ya. Marr in Zapiski VostotnagoOtdeleniya 5 (1890), 318 ; 11, 
298-300. 

64) < bo3oeo5co- (! j96)noo khoirad-k'mnuli (85, 15) diademed ; 
Armenian fajp khoyr, from Pers. xuda (Hubschmann 160) ; 
for d > r, see above s. v. g?583beoo lampari. 

65) ^gfo^gQg^o jarymuli (1, 16, etc.) well ; in this com- 
pound formation the first element is the Armenian n^fi jur 
water . , 

66) 1586530 hambavi (51, 13) report, rumor ; Arznen- 

hambav, 


LXX EPIPHANUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

67) l)6o5a huriay (33, 33, etc.) Jew ; Armenian 
Hreay ; see Hubschmann 309, and above under lampari. 

23. c) LOAN WORDS DERIVED FROM THE GREEK. 


1) 56006^0 ant'raki (13, 9) ; a 

la) bliSo^o aspiti (19, 12 ; 59, 34) ; &an(g. 

2) 56osoo5ao> Ap'ridi'ayt' (34, 14) ; 

3) <5>fto3d {a)tikeif (34, 14) ; 

4) (fottogno^S basilikey (13, 16) ; 

5) obor>8o}6 bat'mon ; ftadfAoi; ; see preceding list, no. 10. 

6) Sgog?T>occi6 bdelion (10, 7) ; fid&faov. 

7) ^00^0560 diakoni (42, 10) ; 

8) so^o^Gibg Dyoneysey (13, 21) ; 

9) sogSgB^o^Bofto Dumentianozi (8, 23, etc.) ; 
Cog8g6(5)o6cQ6o dumentianoni (9, 7) ; 

10) g565gro (10, 4, etc.) (once IgS^bg^o) ebraeli (once /ze- 
z 81, 7) ; r Efigalo<; : the usual form in Georgian is the 

unaspirated one. 

11) g^g^o^a eklesiay (24, 29, etc.) ; exxAqffia ; direct bor- 
rowing : Arm. t-^lrqlrfffi ekeyec'i is a word which has travelled 
by the popular, not the literary, route (Hubschmann 347). 

12) 3gb35l>o56ail> Vespasianos (9, 9) ; Ovsanao'iavoq. 

13) 0)9659^60 T'ebaelni (7, 25; 11, 14, etc.) ; 0fjpai. 
o)g55ol> of>g55o5o5Q T'ebais, Tebaiday, 0*ipats: 

14) ^boDccj^o^g kat'olikey (36, 24) the Catholic (epistles) ; 


15) s^oSgCoBobl) liberkhias (8, 28) ; gr. A^e^tag ( ?) ; noteB 
/c/i = ^ here only, but I suspect that the B kh is a corruption 
of (^ t : the Latin has Libyrtino. 

16) 85655^0050 margaliti (14, 18 ; 19, 23) ; yuagyag/T^, but 
see 22, 5. eorf. y. 

17) 08565565 imartyra (34,4) became a martyr ; denom- 
inal verb from /adgrvg ; also in Armenian JuifiuiltiLftnuuAutt/* 
martiurosanam. 

18) 655o5ccil) natibos (16, 34) ; vanpos from Latin nativus. 

19) 6g6o}6o56o3l!> Nerionanos (8, 22, etc.) ; 

Neron (9, 12, etc.) ; NSQCDV, , 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXXI 

20) cc^eoo olctri (18, 19) ; MQUQIOV ; with dissimilation of 
one 6 r : cf . sup. 22 s. v. margaliti : 

21) 365l>o6o3'b prasinos (10, 10) ; nQdaivo? green (ft'/, leek- 
colored). 

22) eocqco^ccjl) rodyos (16, 34) ; probably godivos ; cf . Latin 
text ad loc. The ii is probably an error (^ -/? for L w in the 
Armenian), as in no. 30 below. 

23) b^fooQoo spyridi (41,4) ; <nvogk ; see above, 25, no.50. 

24) "bflatfj^o stomak'i (20, 13 ; 65, 24) ; a-cojua^og ; a very 
early borrowing, but not necessarily direct. 

25)-kjo56aib ukianos (9,31 ,etc.) ; &xeav6<; ; but see below, 25. 

26) )3532oo3l> upavlios (14, 32) ; o'rcaAAtog ; see below, 25. 

27) $l>5$!8)6o p'salmuni (48, 19 ; 81, 14) yaA^og ; bbcgb^- 
8g6@ sap' salmuney psalter (58, 6 ; 81, 30). Is this word di- 
rect from the Greek (1) ? If so, whence the ending -uni ? Marr 
(Hippolytus, p. LVI) points out that the word sap' salmuney is 
uncommon in Georgian, and infers that it is probably a trans- 
lation of the Armenian uiaqJautufiuA saymosaran psalter . 

28) J536oSo}t> k'avnieyos (16,36); %awtaio a vox nihili. 

29) ^goSbBba k'albanay (79,5) ;^a^dv^ galbanum , a gum. 

30) ^jeooolid k'riisey (13, 17) ; xgoavj. This is probably an 
error in the Armenian ; Jtjt ii for Jtji iw. 

31) ^60^56 k'ristey (14, 25, etc.) ; XguntSe. 

The Armenian words in our text,as was pointed out above, 
are mostly the ordinary loanwords customarily met with in old 
Georgian documents.To a great extent these expressions were 
borrowed by the Armenians from other idioms, and form part 
of the international cultural heritage of the Christian Orient. 
In a number of cases it is and must remain a matter of doubt 
as to the channel by which they gained entrance into the 
Georgian tongue. This is particularly true of the Iranian words, 
where we not infrequently find that the Armenian exhibits 
a form radically different from that of the Georgian. At no 
period was Persian influence wholly lacking in Georgia, for 
the country was always more immediately subject to the 
dominion of the Oriental powers than under the sway, cultural 
or political, of the Byzantine empire. Hence we find a certain 

(1) Jt cannot come from the Armenian vumifnv saymos. 


LXXII EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

number of words in texts even of this early period which are 
derived from modern Persian forms, such as S^bgfto pasukhi, 
answers ; 603^060 bostani, garden , and the like, while 
their equivalents in Armenian are either not of Iranian 
origin or else are of a far more antique type (1). . 

The Greek words in our text, on the other hand, fall into 
two distinct categories. A number of words, such as 
*bo angelozi, gjcogboba eklesiay, ^ooedgoo^ kat'olikey, 
9g6o p'aslmuni represent the earliest deposit of Christian- 
ity in Georgia, and must have made their way into the liter- 
ature coincidentally with the first entrance of the new faith 
upon Caucasian terrain. The others are either special terms 
peculiar to this text and subject, which may well have 
survived in transliteration the various transmogrifications 
which it underwent into other tongues, or else cases of di- 
rect adoption of Greek words. The Greek words in our text, 
taken either individually or as a body, in no way force us 
to assume that the translation was made from the Greek. 

In fact, single words or even groups of them are not suf- 
ficient for determining what was the original language of a 
translated text. Words have, it is true, an individuality 
and an identity which makes them concrete, like fossils, 
but, like fossils, they may have been carried in the great 
blind currents of cultural connection and deposited hundreds 
of leagues away from their earlier habitat, and, on the 
ensuing dislocation of strata, they make their appearance 
in alien surroundings. To pursue the analogy a little further, 
the true history of the geological formations of a given epoch 
can only be determined by a thorough and conscientious 
study of the composition and character of the masses of 
rock themselves. So it is in a literary historical investigation 
of this type : the most convincing observations are generally 
those which show where the original idiom has reacted upon 
and influenced the style of the translator. The better craftsman 
the translator, the more difficult is the investigator's task ; 
but the trained and patient eye can discern the seams and 
creases even in the finished work. That this is true of the 
Georgian version of our tractate, I shall now endeavor to 
prove. 

(1) Gt Arm. pataskhwi (Hubsclunann, p. 200). 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXXIII 

24. d) TRACES OF ARMENIAN IDIOM IN THE TRANSLATION. 

The amount of direct traces of Armenian idiom which have 
survived the translation of the text in a recognizable form is 
comparatively small. A certain number of errors in the Geor- 
gian can only have arisen through confusion of words and let- 
ters in the Armenian archetype. Thus the error coge^godBsQecil) 
T'ermagondos(p.l4,5) for eQ/nod 6v tog must have taken place in 
Armenian, where *j- g and n- d are habitually confused, both in 
capitals and in minuscules : one of the Armenian epitomes 
exhibits the same mistake (1). In two cases the Armenian 
preposition '^ i in (sv and els) has been incorrectly fused 
with the following word (2) : o5856cool>5 (p. 14, 12) lama- 
nt'isa for 'AjuaOovatcDv and oedbo^GHxn^ lositeyst'a (p. 19, 24) 
for 'Odairic. The Armenian accusative plural -u -s has be- 
come attached to the succeeding word in the form boogbo;ma>5 
(p. 14; 17) Sidesiayt'a for "/<% ('^ [J r l 1uAu fit^t ' in the 
mountains of Ida). The form 85^50960 (p. 15,3) Mask'at'ni 
is close to the Armenian Ifuiujtuip-jt Mask' at k. Enebon 
(p. 44, 12) for Esebon (Heshbon) is evidently a case where *t* n 
and us were interchanged. The expression 5p8bl>P))cr>g5gno 
(93, 6-7) literally fulfiller in the sense of infringer, break- 
er (of the law), testifies to the not uncommon confusion 
in Georgian translations of the Armenian verbs ^tuuttufilr^ 
finish, complete and ^mnnjiA^ destroy, cause to perish . 

Not a few expressions in the Georgian bear the imprint of 
Armenian phraseology. These must not be pressed too far, as a 
considerable proportion of them appear in other texts as well 
and may well be part of the literary heritage of the race, but 
as contributory evidence they tend to turn the balance in 
favor of our contention. In this connection we may cite 8%ob 
cr>g)5cT>o (pp. 20, 21 ; 33, 19) mzis t'uali the eye of the sun , 
i. e., the sun, a literal translation of the Armenian uiptr^uilfb 
aregakn ; oo^pgno t'uali eye in the special sense of gem 
(passim) ; cf. arm. mlfi akn and syr. rei^. idem. To the same 


(1) Epitome A : see above, 10. 

(2) The identical thing has happened in the Greek appellation for 
the Georgians, "Ipvjges ; arm. *!/"//,> Hjnug. Vark', 

The Greek form comes from i Vfrac', 


LXXIV EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

category belongs the use of the word 03960, p'eri, color , 
in the sense of form, type (passim), like the Armenian ^-iy^ 
goyn, and the form bbcgl^^GG (pp. 58, 6 ; 81, 30), sap'sal- 
muney, psalter , as we noted above (1), probably represents 
the Armenian "u^jriAnwoi^uA saymosaran. 

Certain forms among the loan words and proper names 
exhibit characteristics and peculiarities which can only have 
been acquired through a sojourn in Armenian surroundings: 


5o tpazioni topaz utt^tu^nti tpazion 

53360200 buvrili beryl ^L^/r^r bitirey 

o;>b3o6o iaspini jasper jtuui^fi(u) yaspi(s) 

akad agate /Juw a/caf 

iagundi jacinth jMu^.niA^. yagund 

sardakad sardachates uutnnjuLutiL sardakad 


Among the proper names two in any case evince peculiari- 
ties which seem to be derived from the Armenian : cp^odBSbgby 
(p. 13, 21) Dyoneysesa .< Dionysus . The % u for i is probably 
an Armenian corruption (/i for /r). The puzzling form 
eo5l^5o3l> (p. 69, 23) Rahabivs Rahab may be a misunder- 
stood Armenian instrumental case with the Armenian article 
- -s attached (/ I ^<W/S^L-) (2). 

Certain other points have been discussed elsewhere ; certain 
syntactical peculiarities will be treated below, but the mat- 
erial just adduced seems cogent enough to prove our point. 
There is no direct trace, moreover, of Greek idiom in the 
text where we can compare it, nor have I observed any pec- 
uliarities or corruptions which imply the direct use of a 
Greek archetype. We can accordingly maintain that the im- 
mediate progenitor of the Georgian was an Armenian text 
from which the fragments extant in that tongue were derived. 


(1) See 23, no. 27. 

(2) See above, 22, no. 43, 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXXV 
25. e) THE ORIGIN OF THE ARMENIAN VERSION WHICH 

UNDERLIES THE GEORGIAN ARCHETYPE. 

TRACES OF A SYRIAC VERSION. 

From the arguments set forth in the preceding paragraph 
it is clearly necessary to assume that the Georgian is derived 
from an Armenian version. This version is no longer extant 
in toto, but large fragments of it have survived, which we 
have discussed above. We must now carry the inquiry a step 
further back and investigate the date and probable origin 
of the Armenian text. The evidence of the Georgian 
shows that the latest possible date for the translation 
of the Armenian version is around the year 800. Certain 
other reasons, however, lead us to assume that the Armenian 
translation should be placed considerably earlier. No detailed 
investigations of the other works of Epiphanius preserved in 
Armenian have ever been made, as far as I am aware, and the 
dates when they appeared in that idiom are unknown (1). One 
point about which we can be sure, however, is that Ananias 
of Shirak (Shirakac'i} (2), that most interesting polymath (c. 
600-650), had access to the tractate of Epiphanius on weights 
and measures. Ananias undoubtedly knew Greek, and only 
a detailed investigation can show whether he had recourse to 
the Greek text or to the Syriac version (3). The significant 
point for us is that the companion work to our document was 
known to Armenian writers in the seventh century. Moreover 

.(1) This is not quite correct : J. Dashean has published an Armen 
ian version of the "Avans(pala.[oiGiq (cf. BA.RDENHEWER iii, 299), 
and Aucher over a century ago published his monograph : fiiuguun^ 

ptiLfitpLU ^uiipniii IL Idling "UuifuUhuig uinuifiinp tj.it Lp-huiifp \juip ipufiini. , 

\anpb"uuigLnj L %ppuil{uigLnj } etc. '{i ilbtibwpli 1821. The literature 
such as it is is gathered in ft. f \ju(jjilibui'ii , ^uf/^uf^uiir Imp jfiuuiblituqpui^ 
nt.ppt3i IL <uftr/iuiq/rufnf.^/irLtf ^utj lihuilt^p (Venice 1909) T. I, col. 578- 

580, but the fundamental chronological matters, as in almost all 
questions in the literary history of Armenia, remain untouched. 

(2) On Ananias see 1/i/^fco/i/, i&zd.,cols. 153-155 : unfortunately 
Patkanean's edition (St. Petersburg 1877) is not accessible to me 
here. 

(3) It is not impossible that Ananias himself may have been the 
translator of Epiphanius, 


LXXVI EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

between Ananias and the year 800 falls the troubled period 
of the Arab conquest and rule over Armenia (1). It is quite 
unlikely that a work of this sort would have been translated 
during these disturbed times ; also the large lacuna which we 
find in the Georgian at the beginning of part 4 (2) tends to 
show that a considerable extent of time must be assigned to 
the Armenian tradition. It is therefore probable that the 
Armenian version is at least as early as the seventh century. 

We have seen above that certain peculiarities in the ex- 
tant Armenian fragments have led us to assume that a Syr- 
iac archetype underlies them ; further internal evidence 
in the Georgian itself tends to confirm this view. The words 
)3532oo}l> (14, 32) upavlios (3)opal, )3o56o}t> (9, 31, etc.) 
ukianos ocean ; Q3g9g65o56o?l> Dumentianos (p. 8, 23, etc.) 
Domitian apparently go back to Syriac forms with an initial 
o, e.g., .Q3CU.X430K'; .cocxiApLsao.t ; it is of course possible 
that we have dialectical ) u f or n o in Armenian, but not 
likely. The men of the lonians (35360 005600560 (p. 63, 14) 
looks very much like a misunderstood Syriac r&cu is. The 
-5a ay ending in the proper name l>cQ6gfo5a (p. 89, 35, etc.) 
Someray suggests a Syriac emphatic termination in r& 
-ay a. Further, I am inclined to think that the vocalization 
of the obscure word be}8c<26Ki6o3t> (p. 92, 7) somoronos (in L 
somahirenus) is perhaps due to Syriac influence. This ques- 
tion will be discussed below (4). The vocalization of the 
forms 560030) (p. 63, 12) Abiof and 653<o 9 5 (p. 63, 12) Nabdea 
seems to betray Syriac descent, as is pointed out below (5). 

Against the evidence presented above almost nothing can 
be brought forward in favor of a direct Greek antecedent. 
The tractates of Hippolytus and the Physiologus contained in 


(1) See M. GHAZARIAN, Armenien unter der arabischen Herrschaft, 
etc. Marburg, 1903 ; J. LAURENT, YArmenie entre Byzance et V Islam, 
etc. Paris, 1919. 

(2) See below, 32. 

(3) The -v- in this word can probaly best be explained as a cor- 
ruption in the Armenian : nMllHJJhflU became corrupted into 


(4) See 36. 

(5) See 26. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXXVII 

the same codex go back to the Greek through the Armenian 
without any Syriac intermediary, but this is not necessarily 
true for Epiphanius's essay (1). Much more cogent is 
the fact that errors" alone explainable by corruptions 
in the Greek text are wholly absent from the Georgian : the 
only certain one which can be so explained, warm water 
(p. 41,28-9) in place of Thermodon (i.e., Oegftov tidaroi; for &SQ- 
(iodovros), could equally well have passed through the Syriac. 
The arguments set forth above are not entirely conclusive, 
but they show that the balance of probability inclines 'in 
favor of a Syriac archetype intermediate between the Greek 
and the Armenian. This must date back to the fifth or sixth 
century, and is not improbably coeval with the Coptic. 


(1) See -21, p. LX, notes 2 and 3. 


THE GEORGIAN TRANSLATION 


26. a) ITS GENERAL CHARACTER. 

The Georgian text is evidently the work of a capable trans- 
lator, who had a good working knowledge of Armenian, but 
whose errors in the transcription of Greek names suggest 
that he was ignorant of Greek. Moreover, the fact that a 
tractate of this type was translated would show that he lived 
in a place where intellectual interests in theological circles 
were sufficiently developed to lead people across the border of 
the merely edifying and practical into more recondite fields 
of literature. I have pointed out above a number of points 
where Armenian peculiarities manifest themselves, and 
some instances where the translator presumably made a slip. 
On the whole, however, the interpreter made a manful effort 
to understand the text he was translating, and did not 
gloss over difficulties when he met them. 

Some of the snags which he encountered were inherited from 
earlier stages of the MS. tradition, and these have been 
touched upon elsewhere. Certain others, however, seem to 
have arisen within the Georgian, through Georgian palaeogra- 
phical peculiarities, and these must be treated here. 

We find a series of errors in the MS. which show 
that we are not dealing with an original, but with a 
copy from another MS. Thus we find confusions between <3 dz 
and 6 r, e6 r and oo t' , % z and c? /, 6 r and b s. All these con- 
fusions point toward an archetype written, like the Shatberd 
MS., in capitals (asomt'avruli). On the other hand, the 
confusion between ? I and I /i, while possible in capitals, is 
exceedingly easy in minuscule writing (nuskhuri). The mass 
of the evidence points toward capitals. The number of mis- 
takes attributable to errors in the Georgian is relatively small, 
as a glance over the apparatus will show ; the major gaps and 
Incoherences seem to have existed in the translator s arche- 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXXIX 

type. A classified list of errata is subjoined in illustra- 
tion of these statements. 

Corruptions : Text p. 6, 9-ll=transl. p. 103, 2-5 : an early 
corruption, as the other versions show; text p. 27, 16-19 = 
transl. p. 127, 6-8 ; see critical note ad loc. : text p. 63, 7-9 
= transl. p. 153, 20-23 : The geographical names in this 
passage are badly corrupted. A. S. L. Farquharson 
suggests that Aradiay is corrupted from Ar<k>adiay, 
which is unquestionably right, also that v great Rome 
may be a corruption of Maaaahta, comparing a 1 similar 
error in the Arabic text of Aristotle's poetics (1). Abiot' and 
Nabdea (63, 12) are, I think, the mutilated remains of BOICD- 
ria and EQjtota. The errors in the vocalization betray the 
Syriac archetype. Farquharson suggests Aefiadata for the 
second, which seems dubious to me. 


Letters or Words Omitted : 8,3 5^53^0 <t ; 9, 21-22 
<o>ccil>56o ; 10, 34 <5>cojew5$gci56o : 5a? o o<gcr>6o;> : 17, 
7 <3>a6as?6o; 18, 20 8B)5fob5] A eo5l>5 ; 20,2 
363^550: 24, 29 80)<3>65so, etc. 

Haplography 13, 16 ^5 <5>$o^@ ; 82, 25 <3 
j ; 86, 28 <?o5> ^58o}6fto2ng65a ; 94, 15 


Dittography : 13, 30 co5 8l>o356g35a ; 18, 7 + A 0)53055... 
C^MSgB^ ; 37, 20 65(wgb53l>53ol>5 ; 40, 30 
82, 33 


Confusion of Letters -. 4, 22 85^65^ A ; 11, 14 e66] 86 A ; 
12, 29 go5l65 b] ?o5^65 l> A ; 15, 1 3geog?r,b5] 5geo^ll>5 A ; 

27, 12 O afoiioj66] oa^^ 56 A ; 54 > 28 31 ^3d?s 5 ] ?a la J 5 A ; 

25, 26 65^gb53oor)5] 65o>gb53oo>5 A (cf. 59, 33) ; 32, 1 


27. THE ORTHOGRAPHY OF THE TEXT, AS NOW PRINTED. 

The principle followed in editing the text is to leave 
the orthography of the manuscript unaltered, except in 


(1) See D. S. MARGOLIOUTH, The Poetics of Aristotle, London, 1911, 
p. 203 : text 1475 a 35 fieyahtwr &v : Diels /iaa0cdia>Ta>v. 


LXXX EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

those cases where inconsistency is condemned by the testi- 
mony of contemporary MSS., or where the reading violates 
the rules of grammar or syntax. 

1) The letter 6 ey is for the most part correctly used in 
the MS., although there are a series of instances where it is 
replaced by 3 e, and a smaller number where it is incorrectly 
employed in place of 3 e. 

a) It is nearly always correctly used in the nominative 
singular of nouns and adjectives whose stems end in -3 e, 
where 6=30. I have written 83636, however, in 56, 19. 

b) 6 ey is also for the most part correctly used in the 
nominative, genitive, and instrumental cases of proper 
nouns with -3 stems. The MS. is less consistent here, however, 
and in the following cases I have altered the orthography 
of the codex : 


6 ey for 3 e of the MS. : 25, 30 ^300.5 ; 35, 3 fc-*$* ; 41, 9 
5306 9 l>o ; 42, 8 3a$(5gl> 356 48, 34 B^bo ; 52, 25 0033563135 ; 
64, 32 0033563 ; 65, 33 ^3^ ; 353^00)5 84, 13, 86, 8 $53^3; 
95, 24-25 6533^60. 

I have not, however, altered the spelling in the following 
cases : 13, 21 505^66^5 ; 0013563 28, 24 ; 27, 22 ; 26, 22. 

c) The MS. also uses the letter g ey correctly in the pronom- 
inal adverbs 3l>66o> and 33660). I have altered the manu- 
script reading 31*05300 58, 7 : 73, 19 accordingly. 

d) -g ey is generally correctly used in the Ablaut of compa- 
rative forms of the schematic type * uqomneysi (1). I have 
accordingly made the spelling consistent in the following 
words : 14, 14 ^oco^'b ; 14, 19 ga^ooDgfogli ; 63, 5 

. 0)555635 ; 70, 22 36563^0)5 ; 78,8 11 )a6ft)3 a l> ; 95, 14 

e) In Inlaut 6 ey is written for v\ in the following words : 
5656-^601^6 37, 10 ; 5b66 56, 26 ; 57, 5 30 ; 58, 1 ; 59, 3 
11 ; 60, 18 ; 89, 6 : I have left unaltered 5^36 56, 22 24 ; 
57, 18; 59, 6; 88,12. 

In 3^0036 78, 24 32, 05360 78, 26 and 5836 87, 31 ; 89, 10 ; 

(1) I follow here N. Marr's plan of using the root ^86 qmti to 
jnake )>5 like arab. J^ to express Georgian forms schematically. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXXXI 

95, 10 we should expect to find 6 = /, but I have left these 
forms unchanged. 6 ey is etymologically correct in 3669650, 
94, 32, but the other forms in the text from this root do 
not exhibit this orthography ; I have accordingly left them 
unaltered, although with some hesitation. 

In a number of instances, however, the MS. employs 6 ey 
where it certainly should not be written etymologically, 
while in others the balance of testimony in the older MSS.ds 
against it. These are : , 

a) In the unformed appositional (1) case of stems of all 
types. It is sometimes difficult to ascertain what the exact 
construction is, but I have introduced uniformity where an 
adjective is coupled with the noun, and the construction 
thus becomes reasonably certain. It is not always easy 
to be certain, as the translator manifests an undoubted 
leaning toward the appositional case. 

b) There are a number of examples where & ey is used in 
the dative case of nouns with -e stems (mostly in proper 
names). This, as clearly incorrect, I have altered, as also 
where it is used in the directive and in the prepositional 
dative : 3, 8 o^o^ojeoeb ; 6, 1-2 890305^5 ; 9, 23 8^o65e?6b5 ; 
8gb586b5 43, 30 ; 56, 31 5(o6b5 ; &5, 6 553^6^5 ; \>od%tidi>b 4, 
19-20 ; 8floe66o3 12, 23 ; 14, 11 : 29, 32 \>bW<$. 

c) The largest number of cases where 6 ey is incorrectly 
used comes in the adverbs and adverbial prepositions termin- 
ating in % ey. These are almost all consistently written with 
-6 -ey in the MS. These words, as may be inferred from the 
adverbial use of the appositional case in words referring to 
time, e.g., 55509 0^2^89 day and night , are really petrified 
appositional cases. On the other hand, perhaps under Ar- 
menian and Greek influence, the older MSS. not infrequently 
exhibit -6 -ey. I doubt whether, as Marr suggests, this is a 
dialectal matter. It is far more likely to be an orthographic 
tradition, and this would explain the uncertainty evident in 
the MSS. We find the following words spelt with -6 -ey in the 
MS. ; -8^6, 3366, 936635, 9^66, 356986, 66, 0756586, 3566 

83(66, 3 ob5 86. 


(1) The bare stem Used after the Copula and neutral verbs. 


LXXXII EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

In 'view of the fact that the orthography of the MS. is 
consistent, I have not altered it except in the case of the 
following words, where sound confirmation from other MS S. 
is lacking : -6506 passim ; S 56@8cci 20, 3 ; l>58@ 82, 21, 83, 20 ; 
3ob5 8 39, 7 : for 8966 37, -18-19 I have written 89683 (not 
noted in apparatus). ,''.'.* 

The letter 6 ey also appears in the Auslaut of verbal forms : 

a) imperative, or 2 pers. sing, of subjunctive : 4, 19 06966. 

b) 1 or 2 pers. sing. of preterite indicative: 5,10 5^8 ^Gi ; 
21, 1 3^0336 ; 21, 24-5 6%%bd ; 5563^966 21, 25. 

c) 3 pers. plural of preterite: 24,20 9g$o6m>; 32, 2 0-5608- 

; 46, 20 ^8^fo6l> ; 67, 28-9 ^50835036^ ; 74, 31 56- 


d) plural of philosophical present tense (1): 

18, 7. . :, s .-: :- ; ; . ' ' : 

I have retained 6 in case (a), as it may be a subjunctive, 
but in the other instances the indicative form is apparent 
and I 'have restored ',6 ey throughout. 

The .manuscript systematically employs the letter 3 v to 
avoid hiatus in the case where the abstract ending -g/cci<35a 
-ef-obay is suffixed to a stem ending in a vowel and in some 
other instances: Soeo89o3g5:m 66,24 is the only exception for the 
abstract nouns. We can also note coocno^gg^so and ScqsgSbQ, 
where 3 is consistently used, as also in 89^3542. The proper 
name Samuel appears as Mcc^ggo 80, 29, but also without 
the 3 40, 25. The orthography of the expression cn^#<Q&o\> 
139850 to reverence , varies considerably. 

The derivatives of the roots $033 c'khov and 3^36 sovr 
show some variation in the MS. $60269650 appears consistently 
without 3. This is the older spelling, though etymologically 
less correct. The 3 appears in the verbal forms. <k<3(3)eoot> is 
always written in contraction in the MS., but the forms of 
the verb 3569o}6g55a show 3 for the most part. 

[^Vulgarisms.- 

A certain number of vulgar forms appear in the MS. In 
fact these are for the most part dialectal, and occur sporad- 

(1) Perma.nsiye in Sanidze s. terminology. : . 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXXXIII 

ically in old Georgian MSS. from the earliest times onward. 
In '''modern times they have made their way into the liter- 
ary language : 

1 , ' - . '' 

a) Loss of g)=ym the (compounding) preposition 5jQ- ay- 
gr. ava- : 22, 30 ibgogjp^So ; 61, 33 "ifrty, and frequently in, 
i>So^Q5o; ef. index s. v. 5o}@5a. 

b) Loss of -6 -n in the (compounding) preposition 356- 
gan- gr. ano- : 50, 21 55^050^ ; 84, 25 ^8G^)83 6 - 

c) Late forms : 8366 after (cfVabove, p. LXXII) Two var- 
iant forms appear in the MS. for the preposition 8065 Sina 
in ev : 14, 31 80505 ; 12, 12 80556 : o85ly that (dative case). 

I gather together here certain inconsistencies in the spell- 
ing which do not fall into the categories hitherto described : 
4, 16 ; 5, 30 31 ; 6, 5 (otherwise 1>i>9^a^o) : 605- 
7, 2 and 60550950^5 56 19, 30 : I>3ogg68o 9, 3; 
and ^0^3660 9, 1 2 ; 14, 11 ; 42, 21 ; 54,' 16; 56, 27 
o^gno'bb'bi and 4, 12 o^^o^obib.s ; 72, 27 ^o^licqg^gSg^ and 
72, 28 ^boj^gSgs^. In the proper names we may note 65, 
6 55eo558 (otherwise 55fo5i58) : ocqbggo 45, 18; 66, 16; 73,: 
32 - otherwise oc^ligSo. . 

It is noteworthy that the nominative of -g-u stems always' 
ends in -<Q u, not - ^ ii. 

One last point remains to be touched upon, namely, the 
use of the plural form in -360 -ebi. This fbrhlj which is akin 
to the Mingrelian and Laz plural forms in -3^50 -ep'i, is found 
sporadically in our oldest MSS., and has become all but do- ; 
minant in the modern language. Its use in both periods is 
marked by some striking syntactical peculiarities : a) in the 
older language it always takes a verb in the singular, like 
the pluralia fracta in Arabic ; b) in the modern language ,. 
the verb stands in the singular if the noun denotes abstract 
or inanimate objects ; otherwise the verb is plural. As yet no 
thorough investigation has been made of its use in the older 
texts, but the instances met with seem to fall under the 
following heads : 

1) Certain words, such as 1)050535^0 country, village , 
0)3^0 seed j etc., generally use this form. 

2) It is used very frequently to denote an indefinite 
number of concrete objects of appreciable size. 


LXXXIV EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

3) It is used somewhat less frequently to denote a group 
or mass of animate or rational^ beings, but is never em- 
ployed for rational beings regarded as separate individuals 
or in the abstract. 

The list of forms occurring in our text is given below : 

o 4, 23-24 ; 10, 29 ; 15, 15 18 ; 21, 24 ; 59, 30 ; 
10, 16 ; 63, 7 8 : fccc^ 3 5 10, 28 ; 15, 29 30 : 
13, 26 : <3M6c>)a3o 15, 26 (15, 28 29 656^360) : 
16, 17-18 : 6539600)5 63, 4-5 : ^O5g51>5 63, 4-7 : b5a5e6 3 51>5 75, 
3-4, 76, 15 : 9036360 86, 8. 

b) Syntax. 

In the syntax of the translation there are two characteristic 
phenomena. The stem-form of the passive participle is 
not infrequently used in a gerundival, and even more often 
in a final, sense. This is not uncommon in the older texts, 
but is not a native Georgian idiom. It is an attempt of 
the translators to represent the Armenian constructions, 
particularly the infinitive form in el- or -iZ (1). The unformed 
or appositional case is used very freely, but this may be due 
to stylistic reasons, and not the result of translation. 


28. DIALECTAL PECULIARITIES 

Dialectal peculiarities are virtually absent from the text. 
Certain vulgarisms have been discussed above (1), but their 
importance is small and they are so few as to be negligible. 
The orthographic tradition is stable and on the whole good. 
The text is unquestionably a very good specimen of the, 
older Georgian literary tongue. 

29. THE TECHNIQUE OF THE TRANSLATION : 
ITS PROBABLE DATE 

The complicated textual tradition, which we have endeav- 
ored to unravel above, and the loss of the complete Greek text 

(l) 28. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXXXV 

of the work, make it difficult to pass judgment on the trans- 
lator's methods. Something, however, may be gathered by a 
comparison of this with such of the other tractates from the 
same MS. as have been published and studied. These are 
the Commentary on the Song of Songs of Hippolytus and the 
Physiologus, both of which were likewise translated from 
the Armenian. My general impression is that the trans- 
lation of our work is slightly less literal and somewhat more 
professional than that of the tractate of Hippolytus. The 
translator of Epiphanius has freed himself somewhat from 
the limitations of Armenian construction ; for example, he 
does not employ the genitive absolute (1), but he has not 
mastered a complicated periodic sentence. On the other 
hand the abstract quality of the translator's language still 
smacks of the original, and does not seem to be thor- 
oughly natural. The subject matter of the Physiologus 
restricts direct comparison, but the translator seems here less 
well-equipped than the author of our version of Epiphanius. 
In fine, I should be inclined to date this translation later 
than that of Hippolytus, but at about the same time as 
that of the Physiologus, or possibly slightly later, about the 
first half of the ninth century. 


30. LOCALIZATION OF THE TRANSLATION. 

Althoughl inguistic and dialectal data are lacking, it can- 
not, I think, be doubted that we have to do with a production 
of the Tao-Klarjet-'ian and Meskhian area(2).The localization 
of the MS., what we know about literary activity in these 
districts in the ninth and tenth centuries, the investigations 
of Marr into the history of the other two documents, all 
impel us toward the same conclusion. Only in this region 


(1) Cf. H. Mappt, Hnno.iHTT,, pp. i ff. 

(2) On the early literary activities in this district cf. H. Mapp-B, 
SKmie CB. FpHropia XaH^si'mcKaro (TCKCTBI H PasBicKank, T. 7)Cn!o. 
1911, pp. i ff. :^. ^aj^odg, ^^o>gjio ^oftgCoiflgCoob ol>flcqe5o5, ft, 1 

>o 1923), pp.. 96 ff. 


LXXXVI EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

was literary interest in Georgian circles sufficiently alive 
to undertake such a production. We may assign it then to 
the pen of some nameless ascete in Tao-Klardjet'ia. 


31. THE CONTENT OF THE VARIOUS VERSIONS AND THEIR 
...... RELATION TO ONE ANOTHER. 

From the above discussion it appears that the various 

Aversions do not always cover the whole extent of the trac- 

itate, entirely apart from minor verbal differences in the 

readings. The state of affairs can best be illustrated by a 

comparison of the Latin and the Georgian. The Armenian 

.as preserved is incomplete and the Coptic is fragmentary. 

The Georgian, however, itself represents the form of the 

Armenian, and Coptic fragments are preserved from each 

; of the major sections of the text. 

... The work is divided into four parts : 

1) The introductory epistle (1) ; 

2) The properties of the stones (2); 

3) The allegorical interpretation of the stones (3); 

4) The order of the tribes in the various marshallings ; 

a) the passages in question (4). 

b) the discussions of the same (5). 

c) the identification of Mounts Gerizim and Ebal(6). 
The relative contents of the two versions are best shown 

by a comparative table. 


(1) Lat. pp. 743.15 - 795.23 : Georg. pp. text, p, 3.1.- 6.7 = trans- 
lation, 99.1-102.33. 

(2) Lat. pp. 745.24-756.13 : Georg. pp. text, 6.8- 21. 13 '.= trans- 
lation, 102.1 -123.5. . ' ' "' ' 

(3) Georg. pp. text, 21.14 - 87.31 = translation, 123.6 - 172.4. 

(4) Lat. pp. 675.13 - 763.27 = translation, 172.9 -183.9. 

(5) Lat. pp. 763.27 - 769, 2 : Georg. pp. text, 87.13 - 88.29 = trans- 
lation, 183.10 -184.8. 

(6) Lat. pp. 769.3 - 773.29 : Georg. pp. text,88.29 - 96.28 ^trans- 
lation: 187.9 -193,23. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXXXVII 

Georgian Latin /; ; . ; 

' 1. has has 

2. has has 

3. has (1) lacks 

. . 4. - . . ' ...' - 

a lacks has (2) 

b lacks i-x has 

has xi-xv has 

c has has (3) 

Here we observe that two very considerable sections of the 
tractate (in all decidedly more than half) are wanting in 
one or the other of the versions. We have in the Georgian, 
Coptic and Armenian the interpretation of the stones, but 
not in the Latin, while the great bulk of the discussion in 
the marshalling in the tribes is present in the Latin and 
the Coptic, but absent from the Georgian. Let us take 
up the latter point first. In the archetype (probably not in 
the Georgian, but in the Armenian, as no lacuna is indi- 
cateol in the Georgian text) there must have been a la- 
cuna (4). We have in the Georgian a heading in red : 
^g5of)gfoo)6g5 55065^9650 eoo^lS^bba The eleventh marshalling 
of the number : The Latin text shows that the numeral 
is correct. Furthermore, a rough stichometrical calculation 
on the basis of the Latin shows that about 16 folia 
(probably two quaternions) had fallen out of the Armenian 
archetype. If we grant that the archetype may have 
had a smaller f ormat, which is not usual in early Arme- 
nian MSS., the lacuna might have been 24 folia, or three 
quaternions. 

With regard to the absence of part 3, the interpretation of 
the stones, from the Latin text, the question is not quite so 
easy. Here several things must be taken into consideration. 
In the first place, the history of the textual tradition can 


(1) Lacuna of two leaves. 

(2) Lacuna at end. 

(3) Lacuna at end. 

(4) Lat. pp. 728.8 Georg. text, p. 87.32= translation, p. 183.10, 


LXXXVIII EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

be carried back for the other versions nearly as far as it can 
for the Latin. The Syriac original of the Armenian and 
its daughter, the Georgian, goes back as far as the Latin ; the 
Coptic version can hardly have been made later than the 
6th century and is more probably to be assigned to the fifth. 
Thus it cannot be contended that the absence of part 3 in 
the Latin can outweigh its presence in the Georgian, the Ar- 
menian and the Coptic. Secondly, Epiphanius in his introduc- 
tory epistle intimates that he is going to interpret the stones. 
He says : Poposcisti... de lapidibus... ut nomina eorum et 
colores et species nee non et loco, seu contemplationes, quas 
ad divinum cultum referant, singulique lapides pro qua tribu 
impositi... exponam (1). Of the matter touched upon we find 
nothing whatever in the Latin text; in fact in the Latin 
the stones are not attributed to the different tribes at all. 
Whether this part of the text was originally translated into 
Latin and then lost in transmission, or whether the Latinizer 
intentionally omitted it, is impossible to say. In the third 
place, internal 'evidence in part 3 shows that Epiphanius 
must have been the writer. Stylistic arguments cannot be 
adduced for a text which has come down to us through two, 
and probably three, translations, but the general tenor of 
the exposition is certainly after the manner of Epiphanius' 
other productions. It is badly written and incoherent enough 
to be his ; the mass of chaotic and undigested learning which 
it uses is also characteristic. The writer had some knowledge 
of Hebrew, was acquainted with Palestine, and the theological 
points touched on, as far as I" can judge, do not involve matters 
which came up after the end of the fourth century. The 
unmistakable reference to the Physiologus (p. 135,9-10) does 
not militate at all against Epiphanius' authorship. 

! We thus find good evidence that the parts respectively 
missing in the different versions originally all belonged 
there, and that their omission in one or the other is due to 
fortuitous causes connected with the separate transmission 
of the versions. 

The relation between the four versions is a matter which 


(1) Giinther, p. 744, 20-26. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES LXXXIX 

would involve too detailed a study to be undertaken here, 
necessary though it will be for the ultimate reconstruction 
of a text on the basis of all extant evidence, in the same 
way as B. Violet did for Fourth Esdras. It is clear that 
the task will not be an easy one, for a comparison of the 
surviving passages of the Greek (in the epitomes and cat- 
enas) show that none of the versions followed the original 
with extreme fidelity. Interpolations evidently exist both 
in Georgian and in Coptic. The Latin on the other -hand is 
prone to omit phrases. But the reverse is sometimes true : 
the other versions have preserved a fair number of passages 
which clearly formed part of the original text, and fail to 
attest some sentences found only in the Latin The Coptic 
translator appears to have worked more mechanically than 
the Georgian or the Armenian, and handles a straightfor- 
ward text pretty well, but when he strikes a really difficult 
passage, he breaks down entirely. The process of recon- 
struction cannot be carried out by following a set formula, 
but must be based on a careful scrutiny *of each individual 
phrase. 


THE SOURCES USED BY EPIPHANIUS FOR THE TRACTATE 
ANP His LITERARY AIMS, 


32. a) ANCIENT LITERATURE ON GEMS. 

Epiphanius appears to have made use of three types of 
sources when compiling his tractate. He had recourse to 
lapidaries ; he dipped into Hermetic literature, and he 
employed Christian sources properly speaking. A brief 
sketch of ancient lapidarian literature must be given here, 
if we are adequately to discuss the question of whence Epi- 
phanius derived his information about gems. 

A large amount of -material has come down to us concerning 
the gems known to the ancient world and their real or alleged 
properties (1). It contains the dregs of an extensive literature 
on the subject, which existed in Hellenistic and in Roman 
times. No modern scholar has hitherto made a thorough 
investigation of the whole subject, and the interrelation 
of the various documents which survive is still largely an 
unsolved problem. Enough work has been done, however, 
to enable us to trace the main outlines of the development 
of the literature, though some details remain hazy. 

For the ancients the distinction, so easy for the modern 
mind, between stones, metals, and minerals was by no 
means clear. We find stones, minerals, and gems Jumped 
together in classical lapidarian literature and this confus- 


(1) The fullest collection of passages from the classical writers 
bearing on gems and their properties (more, however, from the 
antiquarian than the historical standpoint) is contained in HUGO 
BLUMNER, Technologic und Terminologie der Gewerbe und Kunsteder 
Griechen und Romer, Bd. Ill (Leipzig, 1884), pp. 227-228 : Some of the 
older literature is cited there (p. 227. esp. Note 1). On the specimens 
surviving, A. FURTWANGLER, Die antiken Gemmen,'&erlm 1900. On 
gems in .general from the mineralogical point of view see MAX 
BAVER, Precious Stones, tr. by L. R. Spencer, London 1904. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xci 

ion appears even in the tractate on stones (neql At&aov) 
of Theophrastus, the pupil of Aristotle, which is the 
oldest document* we possess relating to mineralogy (1). 
The data given in this work are mostly sound and accurate 
and are derived from personal observation, although a 
metaphysical discussion of the causes (ahlai) of stones 
precedes their classification. Theophrastus' interests were 
primarily scientific, and in the subsequent period, when 
scientific facts needed a dash of the marvelous and miraculous ' 
to be acceptable to popular taste, his soberness and restraint 
did not appeal to the public at large. 

After the time of Theophrastus a voluminous literature 
grew up about the subject. These works are characteriz- 
ed by the love of the marvellous, which developed so greatly 
in Greek society after the time of Alexander the Great. 
Kallisthenes and his like did not scruple to season the actual 
marvels they recounted by still more amazing wonders 
invented by their vivid imagination (2). In the face of the 
great Increase in knowledge brought about by the conquest 
of the Orient (3) it was hard for even the intelligent to 
draw a sharp line between fact and fancy, and an 
enormous number of fables were put into circulation. 
Secondly, we find that as of the level of artistic apprec- 
iation rose among the masses of the population, gems 
acquired enhanced interest ; their portability and beauty 
made them favorite objects for collectors. Ismenias (4) (in 
the time of Isocrates) was the first collector of gems of whom 
we hear; he was speedily followed by many others. In a 
society which reads books, every speciality inevitably evokes 
a corresponding Fachliteratur and lapidology forms no.exr 

(1) On Theophrastus in general see the literature in CHRIST- 
SCHMID, Gesch. der griechischen Literatur 6 (Miinchen 1920), II, 1, 
pp. 60-68. Best ed. of the tractate by Fr. Wimmer, Lips. Teub- 
ner 1842 : eiusdem ap. Didot Paris 1856 with Latin translation. 

(2) These are neatly caricatured in Lucian's Vera Historia : cf. 
also E. RHODE, Der Griechische Roman und seine Vorlaufer*, Leipzig, 
1900. 

(3) This is well exemplified in a matter nearly concerning 
Theophrastus by H, BRETZL, Botanische Forschungen des A.lexarider-- 
zuqes, Leipzig, 1902. 

(4) See Pliny 1S[.;H. 37. 8. . ;;/ 


xcii EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

ception. We hear of various writers who successively dealt 
with this topic, but their works have for the most part passed 
into oblivion, leaving but a scanty sediment in the compi- 
lative hand-books and the scholia of a later age. 

Another tendency of prime importance for us presently 
appeared, and greatly affected the literature. Mankind is 
generally prone to attribute to gems natural and supernat- 
ural powers, for the most part apotropaic in character, 
which were duly registered in the literature along with the 
actual descriptions of the gems (1). 

The locus classicus on ancient gems is in the thirty-seventh 
book of Pliny's Historia naturalis (2). Pliny cites a number 
of his sources (3), which show that he drew largely on Hellen- 
istic literature ; in addition to his mineralogical learning, 
he quotes much therapeutic wisdom, although with an 
open sneer at the Graecorum vanitas (4). Beginning with 
Scipio Africanus the younger, gem-collecting had been a 
recognized fad among the Roman nobility (5), and Pliny's 
interest was connected with the fashion of his day. 

Thus we find two forms of knowledge current about 
gems in antiquity. One branch, which we may term the 
scientific side, is represented by Theophrastus, but even his 
writings are not purely scientific ; he states, on the authority 
of the physician Diocles (6), that the ligure comes into 
being from the urine of the lynx (7). The same statement is 


(1) On this subject, a book by H.FUEHNER, Lithotherapie, appa- 
rently exists, but I have sought in vain for it in various libraries. 

(2) Best critical edition by C. MAYHOFF, Teubner 1897. A sketch 
of his work and bibliography of the critical literature in M. VON 
SCHANZ, Gesch. der rom. Literatur II, 371 ff. 

(3) The chief book of importance for us is W. OEHMICHEN, Plinia- 
nische Studien, Erlangen 1880, which deals with the sources of book 
37. 

(4) Pliny, N. H. 37,31 : vanitatis Graecorum deligendae ; ibid^, 45 : 
Magorum infandam vanitatem, 124. 

(5) See Pliny, N. H. 37,8-70. 

(6) On Diocles and in general on the Sicilian school of medicine 
see the brilliant - Einleitung to M. WELLMANN'S Fragmentsamm- 
lung der griechischen Aertzte, Bd. I, Berlin, 1901, a book far less known 
than it should be. 

(7) IIsQl UQwv 5 ; WELLMANN, op. cit., p. 195. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xcm 

noted and commented on by Pliny (1). The other branch, 
which reflects the semi-popular, quasi-scientific literature of 
the Hellenistic epoch, is represented by Pliny and to a lesser 
extent by the Greek Dioscourides (2), who devotes a consid- 
erable portion of the fifth book of his nsgl Myg iarQMfjg (3) 
to the subject of gems and minerals. It is clear that both the 
Roman and the Greek are drawing from the same sources (4). 
From Pliny this knowledge descended to the Latin compila- 
tors of the later imperial period, such as Solinus and Isi- 
dore (5), while Dioscourides was the fountain-head for the 
indefatigable Galen (6) and his excerptors, like Oreibasios (7) 
and AStios (8). 

The stream of information, however, did not flow unsullied 
by extraneous elements. Greek philosophy and Greek science 
not only lost in depth as they spread over the vast areas 
opened to their influence in Hellenistic times, but ab- 
sorbed a large amount of non-Hellenic matter. Philosophy 
evolved on the one hand into a system of ethics devised 
for the purpose of orienting and stabilizing the indivi- 
dual in the world of men, while on the other it ran out 
into cosmological speculations, in which, along with clear 


(1) N. H. 37, 52. 

(2) On Dioscourides see CimisT-ScHMiD 6 II, 1, pp. 453 ff. Best 
ed. by M. WELLMANN, 3 vols. Berolini 1906 ff. 

(3) Bk. 5, c. 211 f. (ed. WELLMANN, vol. Ill, 90 ff.) 

(4) The question of Pliny's sources for this part of his work has 
been cleared up by OEMICHEN (1. c., p. 104-105) and by M. WELL- 
MANN, Xenokrates von Aphrodisias, Hermes 42 (1907), pp. 614 f., 
Oe. showed that the chief source was Xenocrates, and that many 
of the other writers came in through him, while others Pliny pro- 
bably drew upon directly. Wellmann in general agrees with this,but 
with these important qualifications: 1) Xenocrates comes from 
Aphrodisias (1st. c. B. C.) and not from Ephesus, as Oe. had it. This 
is shown by the concurrent but independent testimony of Galen 
and Oreibasios. 2) From this writer come the greater part of the super- 
stitions (not so much the actual folk-lore) in bks. 16-19 of Pliny's 
Natural History and the Magian material in Pliny indubitably 
comes from him; 

(5) See V. ROSE'S articles cited below, p. xciv, note 3. 

(6) CHRIST-SCHMID II, 2 6 , p. 921-924. 

(7) L. c., p. 1096-7. 

(8) L. c., p. 1098. 


xciv EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

survivals of earlier Hellenic cosmogonies, are found undoubted 
traces of Oriental ideas. Into 'this ^obscure organism, out of 
Which grew the Neo-Pythagorean, Neo-Platonic and Gnostic 
systems, an alien element of mysticism of dubious paren- 
tage injected itself. It is from this milieu that the 
Hermetic books arose, and these in their turn profoundly 
affected the science of gems. Into the problem of the origin 
of the Hermetic documents I need not enter. That Oriental 
elements played a part in their inception is, I think, 
unquestionable, but the details are uncertain (1). 

As later ramifications of the superstitious tradition, 
we have, in addition to the older sources cited above, a 
series of documents mostly of uncertain date. These 
productions seem to be quite independent of Epiphanius, 
and go back to the unscientific tradition mentioned above. 
They have come down to us partly in Greek, partly in Latin, 
while some are preserved only in Hebrew and Arabic. For 
the moment we may waive the question of their chronology. 

The first of this group is the so-called Koiranides (2) (Koi- 
Qavidsg) a curious mixture of heterogeneous data from the 
animal, mineral, and vegetable kingdoms compiled for mag- 
ical purposes ; the text is interspersed here and there with 
impassioned appeals to the higher powers. Its kinship to 
the Hermetic corpus is unmistakeable. Closely allied to this 
document is the so-called Damigeron de lapidibus, which is 
preserved approximately complete only in Latin (3). We 
have also a number of fragments of it in Greek, which have 
been collected and published by de Mely and Ruelle (4). 
A kindred work is that entitled Socrates and Dionysios 

(1) For an oriental origin, R. REITZENSTEIN, Poimandres,L,pz. 
1904, ; contra TH. ZIELINSKI, lz zhizni ide'i I (St. Petersburg 1906), 
p. 88 ff. : W. KROLL in Pauly Wissoware, s. v. Hermes Tris- 
megistus. 

(2) Ed. pr. of Greek text, de Mely and Ruelle, /. c.,..n, pp. 1-124. 

(3) Attention was first called to this text by V. ROSE in his article 
Aristoteles de lapidibus und Arnoldus Saxo, Zeitschrift fur deut- 
sches Altertum 6 (18) 1875, pp. 321-455, and Damigeron de lapidibus, 
Hermes 9 (1875), pp. 471-491. It appears to have been published by 
E. ABEL, Leipzig, 1881, but this edition has npt been accessible .to 
me. . .:-;'..'.-.. ,> ..,.-. 

(4) Ibid., pp. 125-133. 


EPIPHANltfS ON THE TWELVE STONES xcv : 


on. Precious Stones ,' published by the same authors (1) 
and contemporaneously by J.Mesk (2). A pseudo-Dioscdridean 
lapidary published first by Iriarte (3), and reprinted by de 
Mely and Ruelle (4), closes the list. The sole Byzantine 
reflex of the group is the poem on stones attributed to 
Michael PseUos (5). " 

The Orphic poem Lithika arose out of a somewhat differ- 
ent milieu, but goes back to the same sources as the Koira- 
nides. Since Tyrrwhitt (1781) this has been generally 
supposed to belong to the middle of the fourth century 
A. D. It has likewise a series of scholia attached to it of 
the same general provenance as the preceding documents (6). 

The later filiations of the subject are much better known 
than the earlier history, in consequence of the brilliant and 
penetrating studies of V. Rose and Julius RuSka. Rose was 
the first to call attention to the text of the Latin Damigeron, 
which he published in two recensions, having come across 
it during his studies on the pseudo- Aristotelian works 
and while in search of the sources of Marabodus' Carmen de 
lapidilus. With the efficient aid of M. Steinschneider he laid 
bare to a very considerable extent the ramifications of the 
complicated history of the subject. The true answer to the 
riddle, however, was only given by Ru ska (7). 

He was the first to make use of the important Arabic MS. 
of the Book of Gems of pseudo-Aristotle, the text of which 
he has now published in full (1912) with an account of its 
character and of the extent of its influence. RuSka proves 


(1) Ibid., pp. 175-177. . . , . 

(2) Wiener Studien 20 (1898), pp. _ 309-321. 

(3) IRIARTE. Regiae Bibliothecae Matritensis codices graeci m(t- 
nuscripti (1672),. p. 437 ff. 

.(4) L. c., pp. 179-183. 

(5) See .Krumbacher 3 , p* 623. Text reprinted after IDELER, Phy- 
sici et medici grqeci minores I (Berolini 1841-42), p. 241, by de; 
M61y and Ruelle op. cit., pp. 201-204. 

-(6) Best-ed. <put of many) -by E.ABEL, Leipzig, 1885 : published 
by de Mdly aricl Ruelle with some subsidiary material, op. cit, p. 

-A f^tim 


137. 


(7) J. RUKA, Das Steinbuph des Aristoteles, etc. Heidelberg, 1912. 

. , j_ t< ; , . j '.. . ; ^ . : i i. - . ' I -. i - ' '_ ., 'J - ' -' ' 


xcvi EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

that this production (its un-Aristotelian origin is evident at 
the first glance) has nothing to do with Byzantium, as 
Rose believed, but was the work of a Syrian, who knew both 
Greek and Persian traditions. It was composed some 'time 
before the middle of the ninth century. The extant Latin 
versions go back to Hebrew originals, but not to any parti- 
cular works which we now possess. From the Latin text in 
turn the material was taken over by Arnoldus Saxo, and 
from, him by Marbod of Rheims. The Arabic version had no 
'small influence on later Arabic literature, and notably 
formed the basis of the tractate of Ahmed Tifashi, a Persian 
writer of the twelfth century. 

What knowledge did Epiphanius himself have of the 
literature on this subject? However inaccurate he was 
(and on this .point evidence is endless) he was nevertheless 
widely read in all sorts of subjects. It can be shown, moreover, 
that he was acquainted with medical literature. In an inter- 
esting passage at the beginning of his Panarion (I. 3), he 
cites the following medical and scientific authorities : Ni- 
cander, Dioscourides, Pamphilus, Kallisthenes, Philo, lolaos 
the Bithynian, Heracleides the Tarentine, Krateuas the 
herbalist, Andreas, Julius Bassus, Niceratos and Petronius, 
Niger, Diodotus, and certain others (1). The presumption is, 
there fore, that he drew upon a number of sources for his in- 
formation. Some additional material, more definitely Jewish 
in character, supplemented the data he obtained from Hell- 
enistic sources. 

It has seemed worth while to include here this survey, 
which shows how large a body of literature was available 
for Epiphanius to employ, but I shall not undertake to 
illustrate in detail his use of these sources (2). Most of the 
facts and fancies which Epiphanius cites can be parallelled 
fromPliny and the other writers mentioned above. Epiphan- 
ius gathered a mass of miscellaneous material, presumably 
from widely different sources, and dwelt upon such points 
as seemed fitting for his purpose, but these were merely 

(1) Ed. HOLL 1, 171,6-11 ; Dioscuridis ed. Wellmann, t. Ill, p. 140- 
141. 

(2) I hope to return to this topic, which threatened to expand 
an already swollen introduction beyond bounds, before long. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xcvii 

incidental and subsidiary. They were meant merely as a 
garnish for the theological discussion, which was the main 
dish. For his real purpose he drew upon other authors and 
other materials, and to them we must now turn our attention. 


33. b) EPIPHANIUS' SOURCES APART FROM MINERALOGICAL 

LITERATURE. 

In addition to a liberal use of the biblical text, of which 
mention will be made presently, Epiphanius had recourse 
as well to several other works. It is not unlikely that in 
his original work he may have made his citations somewhat 
more specific, but this cannot be proved. 

First of all we note the presence of a considerable amount 
of apocryphal matter. In his discussion of the evil elders in 
the story of Susannah Epiphanius calls attention to the 
discrepancies in the tale between the different versions 'of 
Daniel. It is a well known fact that Theodotion's version of 
Daniel displaced that of the Septuagint in the use of the 
church (1). Epiphanius (text p. 49, 27-30 = translation 
143, 21-24) refers to the citation from Jeremiah in Daniel 
9, 1, which is not found in our present text of Jeremiah, 
and then cites other books, which are the Revela- 
tions (55803^55095560 : Arm. juyu&nt.p-piSi^>) of Daniel . 
I cannot find any extant document which goes by this name, 
but traces of a similar tradition are preserved. The most 
important single fact adduced in the text out of this book, 
(text p. 49. 30 = translation 143. 28-29) is that the two 
guilty elders were named Ada and Aba. Professor G. F. 
Moore pointed out that we have a trace of a similar tradition 
in the Second Syriac version printed in Walton's Polyglot Bi- 
ble (2). There they are called .-uaKb ;n**is 'Amid and ' Abid . 
No definite investigation of this version, as far as I am aware, 
has ever been undertaken. Another embellishment of the 
story derived from this source by Epiphanius appears to 

(1) See H. SWETE, Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek*, 
p. 260 ff. 

(2) WALTON, Biblia Potyglotta, Loudiiiii 1657, vol. iv, p.2, 1. 8, 


xevm EPiPHANitJS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

be the pillar of fire at the death of the elders, which is akin 
to the statement of the Septuagint (v. 61) : nal eylpaaav av~ 
rovg ttal e^ayayovreg egQiipav slg yaQayya tote 6 ayyekog 
KVQIOV eQQLtpe ytvQ dia fjidaov avr&v. This may perhaps be a 
reminiscence of the pillar of fire in Exodus (1). It would 
seem that Epiphanius is quoting from some lost apocry- 
phon. 

A second instance where apocryphal matter is clearly 
employed is in the account of the men risen from the dead 
at the resurrection of Christ (text. p. 75,2 - 76. 12 = transla- 
tion p. 162. 17- 163. 18). The substance of the story could 
be derived from the passage in Matthew, but a similar 
dialogue, though less elaborate and dramatic, is contained 
in the extant versions of the Gospel of Nicodemus (2). The 
narrative as given in Epiphanius does not correspond to 
any of the published versions of this document ; the fact, 
however, that no names are given to the men shows kinship 
with Tischendorf 's Greek recension B. The Latin gives the 
names as Leucius and Carinus. The Latin and the Greek 
recensions both give the interlocutors as two in number, 
but also emphasize the fact that others arose as well. 

A similar passage is contained in the dramatic account 
of Paul's conversion which Epiphanius gives us (text 81,. 1 f. 
= translation 166. 32 f.). He refers in another place to the story 
of Thekla, (text 46, 30 = translation 141, 4) which we 
know originally formed part of the Acta Pauli. Anything 
akin to Epiphanius' relation is not to be traced in the extant 
remains of Paul's acts. Epiphanius' account is not a literary 
gem, but it is certainly much better than anything which 
has come 'down to us in the Coptic. It might be only an 
elaboration of the text of Acts. 

One or two further points can be noted which probably 
are to be classed here.The tradition of the wisdom inherent 
in the tribe of Symeon (text p. 45, 9-13 translation 140, 7- 
11) is probably derived from the story given in Luke '2.25 f. 
This same tradition is also implied in the Gospel of Nicode- 


(1) Exodus 13.21-22 

(2) Codex Apocryphus Novi Testainenti, fed. TJHILO, jp. 666-669 } 
Evangelia Apocrypha, ed. TISCHENDORF, p. 389 ; 417 f. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES xcix 

mus (1). The Saviour is also to appear from the tribe of Levi 
(text p. 67, 4 ff. translation p. 156, 19 ff.). This is possibly 
derived from Jewish tradition or is perhaps a precarious 
inference from Luke 2, which makes Elizabeth, the wife of a 
priest, the cousin of the Lord's mother. 

I have been able to trace direct influence of preceding 
writers in' two cases only. In the reference to Dan as the 
tribe from which the Antichrist is to come forth (text 37,8-10= 
translation 134. 9-12), Epiphanius apparently has Hippolytus 
chiefly in mind (cf. the latter's De antichristo, ed. Bonwetsch 
and Achelis t. 1. 2, p. 11, 10 ff). This tradition goes back to 
very early times, but Hippolytus seems to have devoted 
more attention to it than anyone else. Furthermore, Epi- 
phanius clearly refers to Hippolytus' commentary on the 
Song of Songs (text 85, 17 ff. = translation 170,1 -28), and it 
looks as if the translator of the tractate on the Twelve 
Stones had been acquainted with the Georgian translation 
of this work. 

Some cursory perusal of Hippolytus' works has led to the 
discovery of a number of parallels to the text of our tractate. 
In view of the fact that Epiphanius used his predecessor so 
largely in the composition of the IlavdQiov, this is only to 
be expected. But to go into the matter in detail in this 
place would take up too much time and space, so I 
must content myself with noting the fact, and hope in the 
near future to return to the matter. 

Again, there is a clear reference to the Physiologus in the 
following passage (text p. 38, 16-19= translation 135, 8-10) : 
For when the lioness bears a cub, it lies three days dead and 
on the third rises. The Coptic specifically mentions the 
Physiologus (p. 290), but this has disappeared in the Geor- 
gian. Lauchert (Geschichte des Physiologus, pp. 68 ff.) has 
shown that we find references to the Physiologus as 
early as the time of Justin Martyr and Clement of Alexandria. 
The better Greek MSS., as is well known, attribute the 
work to Epiphanius. He cites it also in his other writings. 

The most important of all Epiphanius' sources is of course 
the biblical text. It forms, as would be expected, the basis, 

(1) L. c. t ed. THILO, p. 666-67 ; ed. TISCHENDORF, p. 389. 


c EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

quantitatively and qualitatively, of his material. A list of 
citations will be found below. The discussion will be confined 
to those passages which disclose textual readings worthy 
of special mention. 


34. c) BIBLICAL QUOTATIONS IN EPIPHANIUS 

Citations are found in the tractate from the majority of 
the books of the Old Testament and New Testament, but they 
are for the most part excessively brief, and the repeated 
translations have destroyed the value of most of them for 
the textual criticism of the Bible. The lack of a Georgian 
concordance makes it difficult to recognize the passages, 
and in spite of my best efforts some have undoubtedly 
escaped notice. In the list subjoined below actual verbal 
citations are distinguished by an asterisk* from passages 
less formally quoted, or merely referred to. The asterisk 
naturally does not imply that the entire verse is cited in 
the text. 

The Old Testament quotations are mostly from the Octa- 
teuch (none from Leviticus), and primarily from Genesis, 
as we should expect. The historical books are less frequently 
cited, the Ketubim still more scantily. Of the Prophets, 
Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Daniel (with Susannah) supply the 
bulk of the passages adduced. 

The New Testament citations seem to come mostly from 
Matthew, but many of them occur in the other Gospels as 
well. They have been attributed to Matthew if no specific 
evidence is present to the contrary. There is a fair amount 
of Pauline material and some quotations from the Apocalypse. 
The New Testament citations are somewhat less numerous 
than the Old Testament, as is natural from the subject. 

In view of the manner in which the book was printed, it 
did not, prove typographically feasible to fuse the biblical 
citations adduced in the different versions into a single table. 
The passages found among the Armenian fragments accor- 
dingly follow directly after those from the Georgian, but 
the Coptic quotations are placed after the text and transla- 
tion of that version (p. 322, ff. ) 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

BIBLICAL QUOTATIONS IN THE 
GEORGIAN TEXT 


A. OLD TESTAMENT. 


Genesis. 


*2. 11 
*2. 11-12 
*2. 12 
11. 1-9 
19.38 
30. 9-13 
34. 1 f. 
34. 1 f . 
35.18 
35.22 
35. 22 
35.22 
37. 21-22 
37.25 
37.31 
37.32 

37. 34 f. 
38. 1 f. 

38. 24-25 
38.26 

39. 7 f. 
41. 4 f. 
41. 41 f. 
43.34 
43.34 
44.12 
49.3-4 

*49. 4 

49.4 

49.6 
*49.7 
*49. 9-11 


GEOR. TEXT. 

9.20-22 
13. 4-10 
10. 1-15 
,22.11-12 
70. 1-2 
54.27f. 
67. 15 f. 
68. 5 f . 

78. 8 f. 
22. 15-18 

66. 27-28 

67. 31-32 
22. 23-25 
77. 3 f. 

72. 4-5 

73. 21-24 
72.2 

68. 8 f. 
68. 16-18 
68. 19-20 

67. 32 f. 

68. 3 f. 
77. 5 f. 

79. 24-25 

80. 25-26 
80. 26-27 
66.30-32 
22. 27-28 
38.7 

45. 9 f; 
45. 6-7 
67. 6-10 


ENGLISH TEXT. 

107. 5-6 
111. 18-24 

108. 1-7 
123. 15-16 
158.20-21 
147.12-14 

156. 27-29 

157. 7-9 
164. 32 
123. 18-19 

156. 9-12 . 
157.3-4 
123. 23-24 

163. 34 f. 
160.8 
168. 18-19 
160. 6-8 
157. 10 f. 
157.15-17 
157. 18-19 

157. 4-5 
157.5-7. 

164. '4-5 

165. 31-33 

166. 25-26 
166. 26-28 
156. 12-14 
123. 28 
135.1 
140. 8-10 
140. 5-6 
156. 21-23 


CII 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


Genesis 


ExOdus 


Numbers 


Deuteronomy 


*49. 13 

62. 30-32 

153. 11-12 

49. 13 

65. 34 - 66. 1 

155. 24 

*49. 14-15 

60. 28 - 61. 1 

151. 29 f. 

*49. 17 

37. 11-13 

134. 12-14 

*49. 20 

56.27-29 

148. 28-30 

49. 27 

84. 10 f. 

169. 21-23, 25-26 

23. 1-3 

50. 15 f. 

143.30-32 

*24. 10 

13. 34 - 14. 1 

112. 20-21 

24.10 

39. 31 - 40. 2 

136. 10-11 

28. 9 

88. 20-21 

184.1-3 

28. 9-11 

59. 29-30 

151. 3-4 

28. 9-12 

28.33-34 

128. 9-10 

28. 6-20 

4. 15 f. 

100. 20 f . 

28. 16-20 

5. 27 - 6. 3 

102. 10-20 

28. 17 

22.2-4 

123. 7-8 

28.17 

23. 18-19 

124.9 

28.17 

27. 7-8 

126. 31 

28.18 

29. 27-28 

128. 29-30 

28. 18 

36.5 

133. 18 

28.18 

40.12 

136. 19 

28. 19 

43. 28 

139. 5 

28.19 

56. 19-20 

148. 23-24 

28.19 

60. 23-24 

151.26-27 

28.20 

62. 20-21 

153. 1-3 

28.20 

66.12 

155. 33 

28.20 

77.19 

164. 16 

30. 23 f. 

79. 5 f. 

164. 18-27 

30. 34 f. 

79. 1 f. 

165. 12-13 

34,29 

33. 17-22 

131.20-21 

34. 29 f. 

47. 31 f. 

142. 6-7 

38.23 

36. 12 f. 

133. 21-23 

2.2 

30.36 

129. 3-4 

32.3 

44. 1 f. 

139. 8 f. 

32.36 



5.8-9 

93, 4 f. 

190. 1-3 

*5. 33 

41.4-6 

137. 7-8 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES cm 


Deuteronomy 





*27. 12 f. - 

88.7 

183. 16-20 


27. 12 f. 

95. 7-11 

192. 12-16 


27. 14 f. 

89. 1 f. 

184.11 


*33. 6 

22. 27-28 

123. 26-27 


33.6 

23. 11 

124.3 


33.6 

66. 21-22 

156. 4-6 


33.10 

67. 1-3 

156. 1.6-17 


33. 12 

79. 32-33 

165. 30-31 


*33. 13 

40.23-24 

136.24 


*33. 22 

37. 19-20 

134. 25 


*34. 22 

57. 22-24 

149.;17-18 

Joshua. 





4.19 

96. 3-4 

193. 12-13 


4.20 

95.29-30 

193. 6-9 


5.3 

96. 1-2 

193. 11-12 


5. 10-12 

95. 31-33 

193. 9-11 


13. 1 f. 

37. If. 

134. 5-7 


13.9 

44. 1 f. 

139. 8 f. 


13.18 




13. 24 f. 



- 

13. 31 

45.17-18 

140. 14-15 


18. 28 

79. 30 f. 

166. 1-2 


19. 1 f. 

45. 17-18 

140. 14-15 


19.32 

41; 22-25 

137. 19-21 


21. 1 f. 

45.4 

140.4 


21.4 

27. 11-12 

127. 1-5 


21.6 




21.7 



Judges. 





3. 15 

78. 15-16 

165. 1-2 


11. 2 f. 

39. 20-22 

136. 1-3 


13. 2 f. 

36. 8 f. 

133. 20-21 


18. If. 

36.15 

133.26 

Ruth 





4. 18-22 

69. 20-23 

158. 10-13 


1.3 

45. 26-27 

140. 20-21 

I Samuel 





7.17 

45. 25-26 

140. 19-20 


9. If. 

78. 12 f. 

164. 32 f. 


civ EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


II Samuel 


I Kings 


II Kings 


9.1 

78. 29-30 

165. 10-11 

*9. 20 

80. 30-32 

166.29-30 

21. If. 

45. 23-24 

140. 17-18 

11.27 

70. 13-15 

158. 32 

12. 34 



10.22 

63. 3-9 

153. 15-19 

17. If. 

45.1 

140.1 

17.10 

3. 31 f. 

100.5 

17.12 

4. 9f. 

100. 17 

17. 27 f. 

55. 5-6 

147,22-23 

18. 20 f. 

46. 6-7 

140.31-32 

1. 10 f. 

46.4-6 

140.29-31 

2. 9 f. 

33.23-24 

131. 24-25 

2.11 

46. 2-4 

140. 28-29 

*2. 15 

33.24-27 

131. 26-27 

2. 19-22 

55. 7-9 

147. 24-26 

4, 18 f. 

55. 6-7 

147, 23 24 

17. 24 f. 

90. 2 f. 

* 186. 3 f. 

17, 30 f. 

93. 19 f. 

190. 12-15 

17,41 

93. 8 f. 

190. 5 

*17. 41 

93.33 

191. 3-5 


Ezra 

3.2 64.32 154.31 

Esther 


Psalms 


2.5 

78. 25-27 

165. 8-9 

2.7 

78. 23-25 

165. 6-8 

18. 4-5 

76.10-11 

163.15-16 

28.1 

58. 8-10 

149. 31-33 

*49. 14 

38. 30-32 

135. 18-19 

57,8 

48. 21-22 

142. 23-24 

*68. 27 

84. 28 

169. 32-33 

68.27 

85. 11 f. 

170. 4, 12-13 

72. 10 

58. 19-20 

150.5 

*72, 15 

58. 10-11 

149. 34 

*87, 1 

35. 22-23 

133. 4-5 

108.2 

48. 10 

142. 15 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


cv 


Psalms 116.3 

*116. 10 

116.11 

*116. 11 

*116. 11 

*116. 12 

116. 12 

*116. 13 

*116. 13 

*116. 15 

118.22 

118. 22 

Song of Songs 


Isaiah 


Jeremiah 


76. 10-11 

81. 14 

82. 10 f. 
82. 10 f. 

82. 25-26 

83. 4-5 
83. 10 f. 
83. 13 f. 
83. 21 f. 
83.24f. 
25. 9-10 
31. 32-33 


163. 15-16 
167.9 
167. 30-31 

167. 31 
168. 12 

168. 22-23 
168. 28-29 

168. 31-32 
169.1-2 

169. 7-8 
125. 10 
130. 15-17 


*4.4. 

85. 17 f. 

170. 17-21 

7. 4. 



1.18 

25.4-6 

126. 4-5 

6.2. 

30. 31 f. 

129. 25-28 

6.6-7 

31.4-6 

129. 28-30 

*9. 1 

40. 25-28 

136. 30-34 

26. 19 

76. 14-15 

163. 14-20 

38.10 

53. 18-19 

146; 14 

. 40, 1 

28. 14-24 

127.28-32 

40,9 



53.6 

38. 28-29 

135. 14 

53.7 

38. 24-25 

135. 14 

*54. 11 

30. 13-15 

129. 9-11 

*54. 11 

40. 5-7 

136. 13-15 

60.5 

59. 7-8 

150.20-21 

17.5 

72. 12-13 

161. 9-10 

*29. 4(?) 

49. 13 f. 

143.8 

*29. 5-6 

49. 8-12 

143. 5-6 

*29. 10 

49. 5 f. 

143.3-4 

29, 21 

49. 24 f. 

143. 19-20 

*29. 21-22 

49. 16 f. 

143. 9-12 

29.22 

49, 31 f. 

143. 25-27 

29.22 

52. 11-12 

145. 18-19 

*29. 23 

49.18-20 

143.13-16 

29.33 

51.30f. 

145. 7-11 


cvi EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


Daniel 



3. 12 f. 

46. 11-12 

140. 34-35 


3. 12 f. 

47.6-7 

141.21-22 



*9. 1 

52. 20-22 

145. 23-24 

Susannah 



4 


5 

48. 31-32 

142. 29-31 


5-6 (cf. Introd. 





34) 

48. 29-30 

143. 19-20 


50 

50. 29-30 

144. 12 


*57 

51. 25-28 

144. 25-26 


61 

50. 6-7 

143. 30-32 


61 

51. 5 

144.23 


0' 61 

51. 9-10 

144. 25-26 


0' 62 

50. 3-5 

143. 28-29 


0' 62 

52.7-8 

145. 18 

Hosea 





*6. 2 

48.9 

142. 13-14 


7.11 

39.2 

135. 22 

Nahum 





*2. 2 

32.35 

131. 7-8 

Haggai 





1.12 

64.32 

154. 31 


1. 22 



Zechariah 





3.1 

64.32 

154. 31 


3.9 

26. 24-25 

126. 19-20 

Sirach 





Prologue 

64.32- 65.1 

154. 31-32 


*25. 24 

67. 22-23 

156.32-33 


49. 12 

64.32 

154. 31 


B. NEW TESTAMENT 


Matthew 


1.3 

68. 13-14 

157. 14 

*1. 3 

69. 14-15 

158.5 

1.3-5 

69.20-23 

158. 10-13 

1.5 

69. 30-31 

158. 18-20 

*1. 5-6 

70. 9-10 

159. 29-31 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


evil 


Matthew 


Mark 


Luke 


John 


1.17 

68. 32 - 69, 4 

157. 28-31 

2.1-2 

58. 21-22 

150. 6-7 

3.16 

38. 32-33 

135. 19-20 

*4.3 

39. 16-17 

135. 34-35 

*4. 16 

35. 6 

132. 26-27 

8.14 - 

41. 7 f. 

137. 9-10 

*11. 13 

52. 24-25 

145. 28 

14. 7-21 

40. 30 f. 

137. 1-3 

15. 33-38 

41. 1 f. 

137. 3-5 

16. 17-18 

43. 22 f. 

138. 35 

*16. 17-18 

60. 13-16 

151. 17-20 

16.18 

38. 20 

135.11 

17. 1-3 

62. 1-3 

15. 23-25 

21.42 

66. 4^5 

155.26 

*21. 42 

71.20-21 

159. 30-31 

26.14 

24. 18-21 

124. 9-10 

26. 15 

.24. 22 f. 

125. 1-2 

27.2 

24.26-27 

125.2 

27. 22-50 

. 24.28-30 

125. 4-5 

*27. 40 

61. 28-30 

152. 20-21 

27. 52-53 

75.4-7 

162. 18-19 

27. 57-60 

52. 34-35 

145. 35-37 

27. 63-65 

73. 29-31 

161. 23-25 

27.66 

73. 26-29 

161. 23 

1.30 

41. 7 f. 

137. 9-10 

2.26 

45. 23-24 

140. 17-18 

*10. 39 

83. 18-20 

169. 34-35 

.12. 10 

25. 9-10 

125. 10 

1.26 

63. 21-24 

153. 29-30 

*4. 5 

39. 16-17 

135. 34-35 

*8. 24 

48. 12 

142. 16-18 

20.17 

71. 20-21 

159. 30-31 

*1. 16 

26. 22-23 

126. 18 

4.5 

94.6 

191. 7-8 

4. 16 f. 

3. 14 f . 

99. 11 

*4.20 

94. 4 f . 

191. 6-7 

*12. 32 

53.24-25 

146. 17-18 


cvm EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 



19. 24 

64.6-8 

154.9-12 


*20. 22 

53. 33-34 

146. 26 


*20. 22-23 

32. 33-34 

131. 5-7 


22.16-171 . 

38. 24-25 

135. 14 

Acts 





2.24 

76. 10-11 

163.15-16 


6.36 

60. 9 f. 

151. 14-15 


6.15 

33. 29 f. 

131. 32 


7. 55-56 

34. 1 f. 

131.36 


8. 9 f . 

42. 7 f, 

137. 33 


8. 26 f. 

34. 20 

132. 13-15 


8. 26-38 

58. 23-24 

150. 7-8 


9.2 

82. 19 f. 

168. 6-7 


*9. 3f. 

80.20f. 

167. 17-19 


*9. 3 f. 

85. 4 f . 

170. 5-8 


9.15 

80.11 

166. 13 


13.9 

82. 15 f. 

168. 3 


22. 6 f. 

80. 20 f 

167. 20 f 


26. 12 f. 

81. 31 f. 

167. 25-30 

Romans 





*5. 6 

47. 9-10 

141. 24 


5. 14 f. 

47. 20 f . 

141. 31 f. 


*5. 14. 

48. 27-29 

142. 27-29 


*5. 14 

52. 17-19 

145. 23-24 

I Corinthians 





2.8 

72.25 

160. 25 


*3. 9 

62.14-15 

152. 33 


*3. 11 

32. 18-20 

130. 29-30 


11.25 

83.12 

168. 29-31 


Ml. 27 

31. 21-23 

130.6-8 



*13. 4 f. 

87. 2 f. 

171. 19-22 


*15. 10 

84. 6 f. 

169. 19-20 

II Corinthians 





2.14 

86. 16 f. 

171. 2-3 


*2. 16 

35.3 

132.25-26 


*2. 15-16 

85. 28 f. 

170. 26-28 


*4. 13 

81. 17 

167. 12, 14-15 


5.2 

72. 30 f. 

160.32 


11. 22 

81. 5-6 

167. 1-3 


*11. 24 

84. 4-5 

169. 16-18 


12-15 

47. 13-14 

141. 25-28 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES cix 
Galatians -SH 



l.'ll 

81. 10 f. 

167. 5-6 


1.17-18 

58. 26-27 

150. 9-14 

Ephesians 





1.12 

71. 5 f. ! 

159. 12 


2. 16-22 

64. 5 f. 

154. 8 f. 


2. 16-22 

64. 12 f . 

154. 14 f. 


2. 16 f. 

71. 13-34 

159. 26 


5.221. 

80. 13 

166. 17 


5. 30-31 

25. 6-7 

125. 14-15 

Philippians 





3.5 

80. 10 

166. 9 


*3. 5 

81. 6-9 

167. 3-5 

Colossians 





1.18 

64. 2-4 

154. 3-4 

Hebrews 





12.2 

63. 32 - 64. 1 

154.2 

I Peter 


'' 



5.8 

38. 13 

135.5 


5.8 

38. 22 

135. 12 

II Peter 





2.17 

34. 23 f. 

132. 16-19 

I John Ep. 





5.6 

64. 6-8 

154. 9-19 

Revelations 

. 




*1. 18 

32. 10-11 

130. 25-26 


2.6 

42. 10 f. 

137.34 


2. 15 




5. 6f. 

47.1 

141. 15-16 


*5. 9 

28. 29-30 

128. 4-5 


7.5-8 

37. 25-26 

134. 23 


7. 14 

26. 4-6 

126.4-5 


ex EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


BIBLICAL QUOTATIONS IN THE 
ARMENIAN TEXT. 

Old Testament. TRANSLATION 

Genesis 2. 12 p. 199. 29 - 201. 3 ; 

p. 219, 7-8. 

Exodus 24. 10 p. 201. 21-22 ; 

p. 219. 24 

Jeremiah 29. 4 p. 225, 4-5 

29. 5, 22 p. 225, 8-14 
29, 5-6 p. 225, 5-7 

29, 10 p. 225, 3-4 

29, 12-22 p. 225, 15-18. 

29,22 p. 225, 20-22 

29, 22 p. 227, 3-4 

29,22 p. 225, 4-5 

29,22 p. 229,22-23. 

29, 23 p. 227, 11-12 

Daniel 9, 1 p. 229, 8 

Susannah 1-2 p. 229, 34 ff. 

5-6 p. 225, 19-30 

57 p. 227, 25-28 

62 p., 225, 22-23 

0'62 p. 225, 25-27 

0' 62 p. 225, 32 f, 

Habakkuk 1, 13-14 p. 229, 12-17 

New Testament^ 

Matthew 11, 13 p. 229, 9-10 

20,42 .p. 233,9 f. 
Luke 20, 17 p. 233, 9 f. 

Romans 5, 14 p. 229, 6-7 

Ephesians 2, 16 f. p. 233, 11 f. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES cxi 


35. d) NOTES ON OLD TESTAMENT QUOTATIONS. 

In a number of cases Epiphanius gives the meaning of 
the Hebrew words and names which occur in the text. These 
interpretations are partly etymologies, partly explanations 
of words drawn from a knowledge of Hebrew or Aramaic. 

The etymologies rest on rather dubious erudition, for 
Epiphanius drew on the onomastic literature, and we can 
easily identify most of his interpretations among La- 
garde's materials (1) : 

Georgian Text. Lagarde. 

Pison, face of fire . 0iff<bv. aro/na nvqoi; (2). 

Naphthali, broadness NeyQahijfj,. nAarvapog ij dvrl- 


Asher, richness 'AariQ. nhovroQ (4). 

Bethlehem, house of fruit BqOhes/A. OIKOS agrov (5). 

Gerizim, mount of FaQi^iv. oQog heAvTQco/t 

salvation vov (6). 
Ebal, mount befouled rsfiovsh. OQOQ /Lis^araicD^ 

and defiled vov (7). 

Amen, so be it a^v. yhoito (8). 


A further instance of his use of such sources is contained 
in the confused and corrupt passage about the allotments of 
land to the various tribes across the Jordan, which is found 
at the beginning of the interpretation of the ligure (text p. 
43. 18 - 44. 33 = 'translation 139. 5-21). A couple of the 
town and place names have defied all attempts at decipher- 


(1) P. DE L,A.GAM>fe, Otidtiidstica Sacfa, Gottingen 4 , 1887. All the 
passages are found in the so-called Glossae Colbertinae. 

(2) I. c., 204, 45-46. 

(3) I. c., 203, 18. 

(4) I. c., 200, 18. 

(5) /. c., 201, 55. 

(6) I. c., 202, 58. 

(7) I. c., 202, 57-58. 

(8) /..c., 200,17-18. 


cxn EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

ment. I have come across no direct parallels, but the kinship 
of the data given with the etymologies previously discussed 
is unmistakable. 

The explanations of the meaning of words are more serious 
and more valuable. They fall into three distinct classes, which 
will be taken up in turn : 

1) On the stone bdellion (text. p. 10, 1-5 = translation 
pp. 107, 20 - 108,8), see FIELD, Origenis Hexapla quae super- 
sunt ad loc.(Gen 2,12). Here Epiphanius derives his data from 
Aquila, but the Greek form is not preserved in the epitome, 
and the other versions Vary as to the form of the word : 
Georgian bdelion ; Latin bodallin ; Coptic &OT&.X&,'i. The He- 
brew is nbirin. The closeness of the Latin and Coptic seem to 
favor an original of the type of the Latin. The Georgian 
is assimilated to the Greek form. 

2) In the second class we have to do with misunderstood 
passages in the Hebrew; 

a) Gen. 49, 4 : (text pp. 22, 29-23, 2 *= translation p. 
123, 28-30). But what he said : Boil not , in Hebrew he 

says : Boil it not >> and Do not grow . The Hebrew reads 

-irvin SN QID ins>. Boiling over as water, thou shalt not 
excel. The Greek has et-vpQiaai; cog vdcog, \m\ e^eo^g. 

b) In Nahum 2,2 the text reads -pjs Sy-yi^w nhy : He that 
dasheth in pieces is come up against thee . The Greek has : 
av&pY] epyvacbv slg ytQoacondv aov, while Epiphanius gives : 
Pison came down and spread itself abroad on thy face 
(text. p. 32, 34-35 = translation p. 131, 7-8). The Armenian 
and M (the Moscow edition of the Georgian) follow the Greek. 
The Syriac has a different text : ^sa.ia n>Y=>.v?9 _nla?. 
.The Greek probably arose through the confusion of Hebrew 

yi> with nis>o. On the other hand yip means to scatter 
(intrans.), or to spread abroad, overflow (of a stream) . 
Epiphanius has presumably conflated the Septuagint and 
the Masoretic text, but his codex read yiaav. 

3) The third class consists of cases where special knowledge 
of Palestinian conditions on Epiphanius' part is involved, 
which he as a native of the country would have been likely 
to possess. An instance is the data on the Samaritans given 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES cxm 

at the end of the work. The facts stated to us are the follow- 
ing: 

a) The mount of Somer gets its name from Someray, whose 
son was Someron (text p. 89, 35-90, 1 = translation p. 185, 
20-22). This statement possibly comes from Josephus, Ant. 
Jud., 8. 312, or perhaps from the onomastic literature. 

b) The Samaritans are called guardians (text. p. 
90, 30= translation p. 187, 3). That this (Sesac?) is the true 
reading, and not the corrupt 9^(6 enemy of the Georgian 
is proved by the Latin custos , npw in Hebrew does mean 
to guard . 

c) Epiphanius' data on the alphabet of the Samaritans 
(text. p. 91, 30 ff . = translation p. 188,8 ff.). This statement 
is both valuable and important. G. Hoffman (1) over forty 
years ago called attention to this passage as showing the 
correct reading of the Talmudic name for the Samaritan 
alphabet, namely yjn and not ysn, meaning to insert, 
plunge, punch, jab . .The Georgian set in is even nearer 
than the Latin insculptum . The main point according 
to the Jewish tradition is that the letters were equally visible 
from both sides, and so formed a kind of fretwork. The, 
Latin somahirenus is not so clear, but its substantial accur- 
acy is testified to by the Coptic form Ctt)JUL&.eipHNOC (p. 276). 
Professor G. F. Moore rejected Foggini's conjecture of OY\IJLB- 
Qivog, but pointed out that the context does not favor the 
simplest guess, i. e., a corruption of i*nnc;, Samarian. The 
Talmudic word is mum, Assyrian, which might involve 
a Greek 'AaavQivog. All versions, however, clearly point to a 
word beginning with som-, and any corruption must go back 
to the actual MS. of Epiphanius. Assyrinos might in Arme- 
nian be corrupted into Somoronos, but in that case the Latin 
is left unexplained. Professor K. Lake pointed out that 
we may have a lacuna before somoronos : in that case the 
sense would be : <Assyrinus, but to that of the Samaritans 
the name>. 

The amount and quality of the Hebrew learning in the 
work is about what we should naturally expect. 

(1) Zeitschrift fur Alttestamentliche Wissenschaft, 1 (1881), 
pp. 334-336. . 


cxiy EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 


36. c) THE PURPOSE OF THE WORK. 

We learn from the introductory letter to Diodorus that 
the tractate on the Twelve Stones was composed at the 
latter's request. That Diodorus (1) was an ecclesiastic and 
a bishop we know, but otherwise his identity is a matter 
of question. 

Epiphanius' aim, as he describes it in involved and tortuous 
language, is threefold : 1) to describe the stones ; 2) to assign 
them to the tribes ; 3) to explain the reasons why the stones 
are appropriate to the various tribes. 

It must be observed that in the text as we have it, whether 
Latin or Georgian, we find no definite statement as to the 
reasons why ' each stone is assigned ,to the several tribes 
The Georgian merely begins each section of the third part 
with a stereotyped formula : The sardion is the first stone 
and on it is inscribed the name of Reuben, and so forth. 
On the other hand, the author does make it clear at recurrent 
intervals that the stone is assigned to the patriarch 
in question 'jafter the order of his birth , and the whole 
"point of Part 4 is to show 'that the patriarchs are not 
enumerated in order of birth in every instance, and, if pos- 
sible, why they are not. 

The fact that Epiphanius does not explain his [reasons 
for choosing the order of birth as the basis for assigning the 
gems led us to suspect tliat a paragraph or two of the text 
had been lost somewhere in transmission. The Vatican 
Armenian proves to contain some material which is not 
preserved in the other versions at the beginning of Part 3, 
wherein Epiphanius briefly touches on this point after some 
description of the breastplate proper. It is not unlikely, how- 
ever, that a similar paragraph may have dropped out of 
the Latin text in part IV, as Foggini and Giinther suspect. 
The Georgian has a lacuna at this point (see above, 31.) 


(1) The Georgian reads Theodore, which is clearly a mistake. 
Foggini (PG, 43, 314s ff.) has made reasonably clear that the bishop 
of Tyre is meant. 

(2) Cf. Gijnther's note, p. 759 ; our ed. p. 174. 


EPIPHANiUS ON THE TWELVE STONES cxv 

We have, indeed, a bald list of this sort in the Armen- 
ian ^Epitome : A; and simila^ data are found in'"the Greek> 
but they seem to be rather summaries of the facts as set 
forth by Epiphanius than the original text of the author's 
own statement. 

The method of interpretation which Epiphanius follows 
is primarily allegorical.! Even though he criticises ;Hippolytus 
fdr<some of his juxtapositions (1), he takes over -his method ^ 
bodily; and ?in ^general follows -the methods favored; -by the 
Alexandrine school* although; here and there he dips > into> 
exegetic criticism;- At the same time* however,^ he introduces 
a>; ; considerable amount" of?' pseudoscientific andc even> of ' 
magical material, while scolding the fabulists (mythographers) 
in the same breath. How : are we -to reconcile this apparent 
inconsistency? 

The answer to; this question^ is, -I think, to be found in; 
thje following: considerations. As was pointed out above, 
there is one clear reference to the Physiologust(2), and the 
kinship between our author's interpretations and the explan- 
ations of the marvels of nature given in that highly popu- 
lar production, the ancestor of the bestiaries, cannot fail 
to strike the reader of the present tractate. We meet with the 
same type of bold comparisons, the same fantastic stories,:, 
the same recognition of the works of God made manifest ; in 
the doings or actions of; his inferior creatures. It is not- the 
direct borrowing that is striking it is the general character 
and method of the discussion, What Epiphanius was probab- 
ly aiming at, unconsciously if not avowedly, was the creation 
of a Christian Lithologus. He sought to purloin some of 
the thunders of the Hermetic (perhaps, better, Orphic) 
Olympus so as to embody them in the artillery park of the 
Christian deity. That he wandered off into digressions' and 
circumlocutions is only to be expected in view of the chaotic 
organization of his other writings : the faults of structure 
and exposition which Part 3 exhibits are the best internal crite- 
ria possible for recognizing it as a genuine section of the work. 
At no point in the extant versions, it is true, does he specifi- 

(1) See above, 33, p. xcix. 

(2) See above, 33. p. xcix. 


cxvi EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

cally emphasize his intent, or make any definite statement 
but the whole tenor of the tractate points in this direction. 


37. f) THE INFLUENCE OF THE TRACTATE. 

Had Epiphanius been able to look forward into the future^ 
without a doubt he would have been grievously disappointed 
at the small vogue which the latest product of his pen was 
destined to enjoy. It was far less widely read, for example, 
than the nsgl ptrQcov xal oraOfjtoJv which survived in mediaeval 
Greek literature, although in mutilated form. The same is 
true of the Panarion. The nsgl rcov d6b&xa UQwv seems to 
have influenced later writers but slightly. After Jerome it is 
quoted by Procopius of Gaza and by Facundus Hermanen- 
sis in the sixth century, 'while in the seventh century Anas- 
tasius Sinaita evidently 'had before his eyes the complete 
text. 'From- {that time onward, with the exception of the 
scanty epitomes, all trace of the Greek original is lost (1). 
No fragments seem to have been incorporated in the catenae :, 
half -Hermetic, half-mineralogical works like the KoiQa- 
vidsg keep the field unchallenged. The other Christian liter- 
atures of the Orient were more hospitable, and the frag- 
ments that we have been able to glean from them we have 
arranged in orderly form below. It is by no means impossible 
that further researches may uncover new fragments and 
further data, but such partial inquiries as I have been able 
to make have so far yielded no result. 


(1) The evidence from Andreas of Caesarea does not necessarily 
imply any knowledge on his part in excess of that afforded by the 
Greek Epitome 1. Theophanes Kerameus (s. xn), who quotes some 
material derived from Epiphanius in his 38th homily on the Woman 
of Samaria (Migne P. G. 132, cols. 720D-725B), and whom Foggini 
thinks (Migne P. G. 43, col. 309D-310A) was the last person to use 
the complete Greek text, seems to me to have been using the ex- 
cerpt given by Procopius of Gaza (see above 6, p. xxm-xxv). 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES cxvn 


38. g) THE PLAN OF THE PRESENT EDITION. 


a) The Georgian Text. In view of the fact that the Georgian 
text is derived from 'a single MS., the constitution of a critical 
apparatus (is 'relatively easy. I have endeavored to reduce the 
apparatus to the smallest compass ; but some orthographical 
changes, which have seemed for one reason or another to be 
desirable, have been made, as was explained above ( 28). 
Inasmuch as the coefficient of dialectal variation cannot be 
calculated with any reasonable degree of accuracy while 
our knowledge of Old-Georgian manuscripts is still so incom- 
plete, it has seemed advisable in general to leave the text as 
it stands in the MSS., save only in instances where a palpable 
incoherence or an obvious blunder can be healed by a simple 
conjecture ( 1 ). A study of the critical apparatus in those pass- 
ageswhere the Latin text is preserved will show how dangerous 
it is to emend freely where texts diverge as much as they do 
in this work. From this cautious procedure I have departed 
in three instances only. The first instance is the passage at the 
commencement of Part 2, about thesardion (p.6, 9-11 of text 
p. 103, 2-5 of translation). We stand on relatively firm ground 
here, since the Coptic helps as well as the Latin. The Geor- 
gian is hopelessly corrupt, and only a major operation can 
bring relief. The general tenor of the supplements needed is 
reasonably clear, though we cannot be certain as to the 
exact phraseology. The second is the doublet (p. 18, 7 of 
text = p. 118,11 of translation) which is not supported by the 
Latin, and is almost word for word identical with the passage 
immediately above. The third passage is found in Part ! 3, 
in the allegorical interpretation of the emerald (p. 27, 16- 
17 of text = p. 127, 6-8 of translation). A sentence makes 
no sense in its present context and I have transposed it. It 


(1) Br. VIOLET, Die Apokalypsen des Esra and des Baruch in deut- 
scher Gestalt (Griechische Christliche Schriftsteller der ersteh yier 
Jatounderteu, pa. 32), Leipzig 1924. 


cxvni EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

/ " . 

is not impossible, however, that there may be a lacuna here. 
Contractions of words in the MS. have not been expanded, 
as they are normal on the whole. This now seems to me, 
however, to have been an error of judgment, but it is too 
late to correct it. 

b) The English Translation. With regard to the; trans- 
lation I have endeavored to strike a mean between a 
literal rendering and passable English. Lt. Col. A. S. L. 
Farquharson of University College, Oxford, subjected my 
version to a thorough stylistic revision and put forward not 
a few happy suggestions, which have been incorporated. 
Georgian syntax is so peculiar that a periphrastic rendering of 
certain passages is almost unavoidable, while the relative. lack 
of hypotaxis and of participial constructions forces the trans- 
lator to .depart somewhat from the letter of the text in order to 
; escape the otherwise inevitable monotony. The text itself is by 
no means an easy one : the Georgian translator was hampered 
by the expressions he found in the original Armenian, and dif- 
ficulties and puzzling passages abound. Furthermore the voc- 
abulary causes trouble in not a few instances. There are a 
number of :unusual words, one or two of which are not clear 
at all,^and the divergence between the versions, when they 
chance to overlap, is such as to make it very difficult to 
divine the meaning. 

In the critical apparatus beneath the English translation 
of the Georgian are adduced the variants of the Latin ver- 
sion, where it is extant. Minor stylistic points are passed 
over in silence, and only major ones are noted. 

I have not felt it essential to print the text of the Greek 
epitomes in full, as they are easily accessible to the reader 
in the editions of Migne, Dindorf, and Mely and Ruelle. 
On the other hand, it is desirable to know what the relation 
between them and the Georgian may be, and for that reason 
I have given above (. 6) an apparatus illustrating this. 
The divergence between the Greek, Latin and Georgian is 
so great that it proved impossible in practice to combine the 
variants from all of them in one apparatus, and accordingly 
on the advice of Dr. H. J. White, the Dean of Christ 
Church, a separate collation is provided for the Greek, This 


jfiPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES cxix 


has! been- incorporated v4n .^he Introduction : ior-typographi- 
cal- reasons. 

: In the case of the Armenian and the Coptic it had orig- 
inally been the editor's intention to construct additional 
; separate^ apparatus criticito illustrate the difference between 
them and the Georgian. As work on the book progressed, 
however, it became clear that the illumination to be 'derived 
from this source was relatively slight, and they were accor- 
dingly suppressed. 

c) The Indices. In the indices to the Georgian text have 
been included : 

1 ) Names of persons, actual . and legendary. 
.2) Names of places. and tribes. 

3) Words found in the text. 

For the first two groups all references have been given, 

but with the third a selection has been made. References to 

the names of gems; have been inserted in full, as have also 

those words which occur three or four times only. If a word 

-Occurs in passages other than in ,the instances cited, this 

fact is indicated by etc. placed after the reference. The 

numbers in the index refer to page and line of the Georgian 

.text, but if more than one instance occurs on a given page, 

the line references are separated only by a space, with no 

mark of punctuation, e. g., 90, 2 4 14. 

In compiling the index of words the following classes 
have been excluded : a) personal pronouns and simple demon- 
stratives; b) all prepositions and postpositions, unless 
compounded ; c) all particles ; 4) all forms of the root ar 
to be. All nouns and adjectives are cited in the nominative 
singular, but names of peoples are given in the nominative 
plural (-m). The arrangement of verbs in a Georgian vocabu- 
lary is a difficult matter. After some hesitation the older 
system of Tchoubinof was adopted, in which they are ar- 
ranged alphabetically by the form of the masdar (nomen 
verbale) ; this offers distinct practical advantages over any 
arrangement by radicals. It does not, however, obviate certain 
systematic difficulties : 1) it takes no account of the different 
.aspects of the verbal stem ; 2) certain stems have ijo masdar, 


cxx EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

such as impersonal verbs. I have therefore classed the verbs ac- 
cording to the simple stem, and to save space have not indic- 
ated the derivative stems found in the text ; the translation 
given is that of the root-meaning. The translations of 
proper names are those ordinarily employed in English, 
with the exception of a few instances, where I have printed 
the Greek. In certain cases a derivative verbal noun, which 
is used independently in the text as a substantive, is inserted 
under a special lemma ; otherwise such forms are classed 
under the verbal masdar. I have sought to be consistent in 
this respect, but fear that the desired result has not been 
attained in all cases. For impersonal verbs I have cited the 
third person singular of the present tense, e.g.j 9913531), she- 
hgavs. It is not certain in all cases which of the various masdar 
forms employed in Georgian would have been used by the 
translator. In such instances I have followed the practise of 
employing what appears to be the most ancient form. In a 
few cases, where the true form is not known/I have adduced 
the form given in the text either under the lemma of the 
radical letters, e. g., k'v* : ektis, or a hypothetical masdar 
form, e. g., k'onay* ; all such forms have been marked with 
an asterisk *. 

At the end of the word-index is subjoined a list of errors 
in the printed Georgian text. The list is long, far longer than 
it should be, and it testifies only too eloquently to the 
difficulties involved in preparing the text for printing. 

A somewhat similar set of indices has been compiled by 
Abbe H. De Vis for the Coptic text. An index verborum did 
not seem to be necessary here, but the proper and place na- 
mes have been registered and a list of the Greek words found 
in the text has been drawn up in the manner favored by Cop- 
tic scholars. 


39. h) CONCLUSIONS. 

The conclusions arrived at during the investigation of 
the tractate may be summed up as follows : 
The Tractate on the Twelve Stones was written by Epiphan- 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES cxxi 

ius towards the end of his life (ca. 394) for a bishop Diodorus 
probably Diodorus of Tyre. In its original form it comprised' 
four parts: ,. , 


A letter to Diodorus. 

2) An account of the appearance and properties of the 
gems. ' 

3) A hermeneutic section concerning the allegorical inter- 
pretation of the stones as pertaining severally to the twelve 
patriarchs. 

4) A section dealing with the order of the tribes where 
they are mentioned in the Octateuch, with the purpose of 
showing that they are not adduced in order of birth. As a 
sort of addendum to this is appended the discussion of the 
Samaritans and the identification of Mounts Gerizim and 
Ebal. "_ . 

The complete text was known to Jerome, to Procopius of 
Gaza, to Facundus Hermianensis and to Anastasius Sinaita, 
but no trace of the complete Greek original is to be found 
after 700 A. D. The Greek text was epitomized at an uncertain 
date by an unknown writer who included most of the mineral- 
ogical data of Part 2 ; a briefer epitome of Part 2 was made 
by Anastasius Sinaita, who also included an extract from 
Part 4. This was embodied in his Quaestiones. 

The complete Greek text was translated into three dif- 
ferent languages : 

1) Into Latin presumably in the fifth century, by an 
unknown translator of inferior capacity both as a Hellenist 
and a Latinist. This translation apparently did not include 
Part 3. It became attached in some way to the Collectio 
Avellana, and, has so survived. 

...*- 

2) Into Coptic, probably also at an early date. This transla- 
tion comprised the entire text. It has come down to us in 
fragments of one MS. (perhaps two) of the tenth century 
from the White Monastery of Shenudi near Akhmim. This 
MS. presumably contained a corpus of Epiphanian writ- 
ings, including some of the spurious homilies. Of it about 
eighteen f olia, or fragments of folia, are preserved in various 
European and Egyptian libraries. These are reprinted in 
the original tongue and translated below (pp. 236-321). 


cxxii EPiPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES 

- - . f 

3) Into Striae, presumably alsb a iri ! the 5th i! century: 
This Aversion- was probably 5 contemporary witl the translation 
of the yieQi (jistQwv xal ataOfttov, but has vanished^ ^without 1 ' 
leaving any direct trace. The Syriac in its turm was : ren- 
dered into Armenian rather crudely, presumably about the 
sixth century. / 

The Armenian text is not preserved complete. The Vati- 
can MS. has parts 1-3 up into the description, of? the agate : 
two others at Ecmiadzin contain the introductory epistle*; 
the Jerusalem MS. furnishes us with a part of the inter- 
pre ' ation of the ligure in interpolated form (publishedvbelowy 
pp. 224 ff.), while the Paris codex supplies us with a small 
section of the interpretation of the beryl (published below * 
pp. 232-233). Part 2 of the Armenian- text, containingtthe 
description of the gems, was epitomized by various hands,- 
These we have published and translated, below (pp>. 196- 
223). The Vatican and the Ecmiadzin MSS. came into our 
hands too late to be included in the present publication; 

After a lapse of some three centuries the* Armenian 
version was translated into Georgian from a mutilated copy* - 
in which three quaternions were missing at ', the commence-r 
ment of Part 4. The translator is unknown, but the history . 
of the MS. and the character of the language lead -us to infer t 
that he was a monk in one of the monastic centres of Tao- 
Klardjet'iai and that the translation took place during the 
ninth century. This MS. or an immediate descendant of it 
was the archetype of the Shatfterd codex (ca: 970); from 
which all later Georgian MSS; are directly; descended. From 
the Shatberd codex Djanashvili printed Parts 1 and 2 ' of 
the text complete, and also: the end ! of Part 4 ; from it the 
whole document is now published for the first .time. 

The aim of the tractate was clesarly to 'steal an arrow from 
the quiver of the mineralogists, and* to form a pendant to 
the Physiologus. Epiphanius seems to have drawn largely 
on the unscientific literature on gems which he found at 
hand, but the only author whose influence can actually be 
traced in the work is Hippolytus. His aim was not attain- 
ed, for the influence of the tractate at ' least' in Greek 
^ seems to have been small. 


EPIPHANIUS ON THE TWELVE STONES '' cxxm 

By combining and comparing the various versions we can 
approach to something like the original text, if not ad verbum 
at least ad sensum, but this can only be done after the various 
texts and versions have been made accessible and subjected 
to further study. Comparison shows that the Latin is the 
most accurate ; next comes the Armenian, while the Coptic 
and the Georgian take the third place. 


PRJWED BY "IWPRIMERIE DE MEESTER, WETTEREN, BELGIUM, 


I 0^*66' 45 


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SERMON 

OF 

EPIPHANIUS THE CYPRIAN 

OF EPIPHANIUS, 

THE BISHOP OF THE CITY OF CONSTANTIA, 
WHICH IS THE METROPOLIS OF THE ISLAND OF CYPRUS, 
WHICH HE SPAKE CONCERNING THE TWELVE PRECIOUS STONES. 


TABLE OF ABBREVIATIONS. 

I. Mss. 

A, ms. ms. 1141 (= 383 Taqaishvili) circa a. 970 of the Library 
of the Society for the Extension of Literacy among the 
Georgians (Tiflis). 

II. Versions. 

Ar Armenian epitomes and texts ed. and tr. by R. P. Blake 

C Fragments of the Coptic text ed. and tr. by H. de Vis. 

G 1 G 2 Greek epitomes in S. Epiphanii opera omnia ed. G. Din- 
dorf, Lipsiae 1859-62, IV. p. 225 ff, 233 ff. 

L Latin' text in CSEL 38. 2 (Collectio Avellana ed.O. Gun- 

ther, Vindobonae 1898), p. 743 ff. 

III. Editions. 

Dj. Partial edition of Georgian text by M. G. Djanasvili, 

C6opeHK r B MaiepiaJOB'B &JLA onncajna MtcxHOCTeft H ttie- 

KaBKasa, vol. 24 (Tiflis 1898), pp. 16-48. 


IV. Conventional Signs. 

> indicates an omission in the Latin or other versions. 

< > words conjecturally supplied in the Georgian text are 
inserted within angular brackets. 

[ ] words which appear superfluous in the Georgian text 

are enclosed in square brackets. 

(or,...) alternative renderings of Georgian words are inserted 
in the body of the English translation within round 
brackets with the word or, prefixed. 

(lit....) literal renderings of Georgian idioms are inserted in 
the body of the English translation within round brac- 
kets,' with the word lit. prefixed. 

words in italics in the English have been supplied for 

the sense. 

p. 3. The numerals in the margin refer to the pages of the 

present edition of the Georgian text. 



OF 

EPIPHANIUS THE CYPRIAN 


OF EPIPHANIUS, 
r THE BISHOP OF THE CITY OF CONSTANTIA, 

WHICH IS THE METROPOLIS OF THE ISLAND OF CYPRUS, 
WHICH HE SPAKE CONCERNING THE TWELVE PRECIOUS STONES. 


To my master, honored brother and partaker in my la- 
bors, Theodore the devout bishop, Epiphanius the bishop ; 
10 in the name of the Lord I greet thee. 

The great gift of grace He gave and did not receive, when 

the Lord of Life asked the Samaritan woman to give him to 

drink, for He Himself was the Fount of Life. He came and 

sat beside the well, wearied from the road. He did Jier the 

15 honor to converse with her and led her on the path of truth. 

^Wherefore also His coming was in the flesh and to each 

and every one in connection therewith ; and He bestowed 

that gift lavishly upon the human nature which was brought 

nto being by Him. Now each and all confess Him through 


11 Of. Jo. 4. 16. 

ALF G, (8-10) 

1-7 title >L 9 Theodore] Diodoro L 10 thee]> L 
11 not] potius quam L 12 Life> L 13 Life] salutis L 
14 He did ...19 by Him] L ut consequens ueritatis argumentuni 
corporalis suae praesentiae nequaquam prorsus excederet, ut ubique 
simul human ae naturae, quam condidit, propria largiter dona con- 
cedens, nunc earn quidem dignanter assumens, nunc etiam id, quod 
eius est, ueraciter asserens, nee non et curam eius ac prouidentiam 
gerens 19 Now each... 100.3 creature > L 100.3 His disciples.. 


the conjunction of one incarnation, one word and one Will 
for all time and unto eternity. He is the true Son of God, 
who sought out his own creature. His disciples became like 
unto this one, and His servants bestowed gifts and received 
not aught from any one. Verily did the prophet Elijah 5 
(Elia) make himself like unto his Lord ; he asked of her 
,Dj.l8 who had not so much as one single measure of plough-land 
as though he had need of something : he asked of this widow, 
P-4 for he wished to fill this widow woman with his blessing and 
to feed her. 10 

In this wise, then,, thy honored virtue demands of my 
insignificance yet more than this, since thou wishest to make 
me a gift of this' thy grace which is with thee by giving more 
than thou receivest. Thou too hast made thyself like unto 
thy fellow-workers: thou multipliest by the offering of 15 
prayer to God my powers for thy needs. If one gave not from 
the horn of plenty when there was a lack of oil in the cruse 
and a want of wheat in the jar of misery, who then would be 
able to be generous? 

But thy honor hath requested me, as is written in that 20 
book of the oracular tablet of the law, which is adorned 
with the stones after their order. This lay on the breast of 


5 I Kgs. 17. 10 ft. 17 Of. I Kgs. 17. 12. 20 Ezod. 28. 16-20 <39. 0-19). 

ALF 

6 his Lord] L about the same with different words and order ; be- 
fore 6 Lord -f praecedens L 6 he asked... 8 of something 
]L modum quidem necessariae rei competenter efflagitans, su- 
per id aut quod necessarium erat, eius, quae in se morabatur, 
largitatem benedictionis insinuans 9 He asked ...10 feed 
her] L qui panem quidem poscebat uiduam, sed occasione peti- 
tionis hums benedictionis opulentiam commodabat 12 since 
thou... 13 with thee> L 14 Thou too... 15 wor- 
kers] cooperante L 15 before offering -f- iugiter L 16 My 
powers for thy needs >L 16 If one... 19 be generous] L 
capsaces quidem olei indeficiens ex paruo praestabitur, hydriae 
uero farinae supra modum largitatis copia conferetur 20 after 
me + in principio L 21 that book] L epistulam tuam re- 
cte, but error probably goes back beyond the Georgian the 
oracular tablet of the law] L rational! et passim 21 which is.. 
101. 2 high priest] L de lapidibus, qui in superhumeralis rational! 
pontificis tune super pectus Aaron apponl praecepti sunt 


101 

Aaron (Ahroni) the high-priest. Now please to behold that thy 
virtuous self may know what names the twelve stones have, 
in what places they are found and what potency is in them ; 
how the names of each of the twelve tribes are inscribed upon 
5 them, or how the concept was evidenced in them after the 
likeness of the divine liturgy, since the high-priest by the 
names qf the stones satisfied the needs of the people . 

But, as I have said above, it was utterly impossible for 
me to conquer all this difficulty by mind, and it was unat- 

lOtainable for me to fulfill (lit. find) so great a request, just 
as was the case with the widow woman in vie,w of her pover- 
ty and destitution; but, just as for the widow through the 
blessings of Elijah there ensued a growth and an increase p. 5. 
and even an abundance and as the Lord asked of the woman 

15 of Samaria the palpable water, in His mind He clearly be- 
stowed on her great gifts. 

So, too, myself, who am scant of understanding and most 
insignificant in wisdom and knowledge and unpolished of 
speech, hast thou made strong by the laying-on of hands, 

20 and by thy prayers hast thou filled me also from every side, Dj. 20 
just as was the merchant, rich in all things, and just as Eli- 
jah (Elia), amid the land parched by drought, brought down 
from above streams of rain, and just as many others of the 
righteous and of the prophets, whose son and disciple art 


ALF 

1 Now please to behold> L 1-2 that thy virtuous self may 
know] L ut ... exponam after 2 names + L colores et species 
the twelve stones] L eorum 3 what potency is in them > L 
in what places '...found after 6 liturgy L 5 concept.. .6 liturgy] 
L contemplationes quas ad diuinum cultum referant 6 since 

the ... 7 the people > L 81 have said above] L memoravi 
it was utterly impossible ...102, 4 thy prayers] L tamquam 
praefatae uiduae propter inopiam . difficilis erat horum prorsus 
inventio ; uerum, sicut illi per benedictionem miranda res acci- 
dit et Samaritanae pro <a> qua sensibili mysteriorum doraini 
munus ostensum, sic nobis <ini> nimis sapientia atque scientia 
ac sermone const itutis undique facultas est attributa uelut ex 
multis imbribus fertili largitate diffusis Heliae precibus aliorum- 
que prophetarum, quorum tu filius discipulus et successor uenera- 
bilis approbaris, accipiens aeque ut illi a domino gratiam eamque 
nobis orationibus tuis impertiens 


102 

thou also, so, too, thy reverence was made worthy of being 
their equal. From them hast thou received unbounded 
riches, with which the Lord hath endowed thee, and thou 
hast bestowed upon us 'yet more through thy prayers. 

Now shall I, too, begin the exposition of thy commands, 5 
but I implore thy honorable self not to blame me for the 
attempt, which may be a matter beyond me, but, in obe- 
dience to., thy urging, though it be beyond my power, I 
begin to recount. 

In the first place they are arranged by fours ( ?), for the 10 
stones were set in four rows, which were placed on the ora- 
cular plate of the law. And the plate of the law is itself four- 
sided, a span in depth and a span in breadth. In the first 
row, the first stone is the sardion (sardidni) and after it the 
topaz (tbazioni) and then the emerald (zmuri), In the second 15 
the chalcedony (kark'edoni) and the sapphire (sap'ironi) 
p. 6 and the jasper (iaspini). In the third, the ligure (lugyrioni), 
the agate (akatey), the amet hyst (amet'ystoni) ; and in the 
fourth, which is the last of all, the jacinth (iakint'ey) and 
the beryl (byvrili) and the onyx (p'rtskhili). 20 

These are the twelve gems arranged on the oracular and 
legal plate, each arranged according to its place, inserted 
Dj.22 and fixed. , 


10-20 cf. Exod. 28. 6-20 

ALF (1-7) Ar (12 f)G (25 f) 

5 Now shall... 9 recount] L unde iam de his incipiam dice- 
re, primum quidem ueniam poscens et propositi mei studium pa- 
tefaciens, licet inualide dissertationis possim referre sermonem 
10 they are arranged by fours] scriptus in quattuor uersibus L 
10-11 the stones were set>L 13 depth] longitudine L 14 row 
uersus L 16 chalcedony] carbunculus L after 14 second + 
uersus L, as after 17 third and 19 fourth 19 jacinth] chrysoli- 
thus L after 22 plate + L quod in superhumerali pontificis 
ponebatur each arranged > L after 22 inserted + L quo- 
rum differentias Ipcaque diceniug 23 and fixed> L 


103 


1. THE GEM SARDION (SARDIONI). 

The sardion, which is found in Babylon, whose appearan- 
ce is red like fire or like blood, is so called and is given the 
name of a fish, for the color of this fish sardion is 
5 the color of blood. When they dry this fish, its color becomes 
like that of blood and through the similarity of its appea- 
rance the name sardion is given to this fish. It is found 
in Assyria. The gem itself is sparkling and it has healing 
power. The leeches take it and employ (lit. put) it as a reme- 

10 dial agent and they cure tumors and running ulcers and 

other wounds incised by the sword. They make a decoction 

of it and use it as a liniment and by the application "(lit. 

anointing) thereof the lesions become healed. 

There is another jstone, which they call sardion-p'rtskhil 

15 (sard-onyx) arid some call it molok'as because of its color 
and potency, which has a resemblance to, the beet; for those 
who drink the water, his belly ceases to become swollen 
(lit: becomes young again) and he receives relief. Its color p. 7 
is that of green verdure and, according to whether moisture 

20 is present, its. greenish hue becomes more brilliant, espe* 
cially 1 in the summertime and during Eastertide. 
There is another stone as well, like unto these, which they 


ALC G" AT 

1 title >L 2 sardion ... 5 blood] the Georgian is very cor.- 
rupt ; I have emended freely on the basis of the Latin . 5 When 
they ...6 blood > L 7-8 It is found in Assyria] L in Babylone 
uero, quae est apud Assyrios, gignitur 8 sparkling] L perlu- 
cidus it] L cuius sucum 9-10 take ...employ ...agent] L 
super ...linientes sedant 11 incised by the sword] L quae per 
incisionem ferri proueniunt 11-12 They make ...liniment] see 
above 1. 9 12-13 and by the application ...healed> L 14 stone 
which they call> L 15 because of ... 16 beet> L 16-17 for 
those ...water> L 17 his belly ...18 relief] L sciens attenuare 
pinguedines ; thereafter + L ipsius autem forma est 18-19 Its 
color ...verdure] L subuirklis aliquantulum 19 and according 
to ...21 Eastertide]L potentiorque ,magis circa uerni temporis 
initium, quando pascha celebratur 22 stone ...they call>..L 


104 


call sardakad (sardachates), which is entirely of a whitish 
tinge, somewhat like that of the stone agate (akad), and it 
itself has a certain sheen ; as they say, it drives out evil, 
and they call it the bringer of peace. 


2. THE GEM TOPAZ (TBAZIONI). 5 

Dj. 24 The stone topaz is bright red in appearance and is similar 
to the gem Which they call chalcedony (kark'idon). The 
stone topaz is found in the city which is called Tobazey in 
the land of India (Hindoet'i). It was found thus. The 
stone-cutters Were cutting stone and it wa? found in a stone 10 
which they were cutting. When they saw the lovely color 
of this stone and its marvellous appearance, they took 
and sold it to some merchants of the Alabastrians, for the 
country of the Alabastrians is near to India, They received 
for it from the Alabastrians a small price, and gave them 15 
the gem topaz: the Alabastrians came to the city of 
Thebes (T'ebay), which is in Egypt. They sold it for a price 
greater than that which they gave. The Thebans offered 
it as a gift to the king who at that time was in that city 
and he took the topaz gem and placed it in his crown, juist2Q 
in the middle of the forehead. 


ALC G Ar 

1 which is ...2 tinge] L circa quern lapidem albus quidam circulus 
apparet 2 and It ... 3 evil] L quern hi,qui fabulosa confingunt, 
mala fugare pronuntiant posse : the Georgian is corrupt 5 The 

gem tbazioni] L de lapide topazio and passim 6 bright red 

...7 the gem] L rubrum post lapidem, i. e., brighter... than the 
stone 7 kark'idon] L carbunculus 8 the city which is cal- 
led Tobazey] L in Topaze ciuitate 10 It was found ... 11 were 
cutting] L inuentus est ... in corde lapidis ab his, qui ibidem 
lapides tune caedebant 4 lovely color,... 5 appearance] L 
quern ...splendidissimum ; thereafter + L delectati pulchritudine 
eius 12 they took it] L lapidem caesores ...ostenderunt % 13 af- 
ter first Alabastrians + L paruoque pretio 13 for the country 
...17 Egypt> L 17 They sold ...18 gave] L Alabastri quoque The- 
baeis pretio distraxere maiori 18 after Thebans + L nihilo- 
minus 19 as a gift> L 19-20 king, ...he] L reginae, ... ilia 


On trial the stone is found to have the following property ; 
when it is ground on the leeches' whetstone, it does not 

J exude red liquid (lit. water) from the grinding after the like- p-8 

ness of its own color, but its fluid (lit. dust) is white, of 
5 the color of milk, and it fills many vessels, as many as the. 
physician desires who gives to drink of the -stone. And when 
the dust has been collected, he weighs thfe gem ; not only 
has it minished in no wise, but it has .the same weight (lit. 
equality) and appearance and circumference : such as they 

10 were, so has it still and has not lessened. 

It has a beneficial working 'in .disorders of the eyes ; if 
one should drink its water, it (avails for the short-sighted 
and for those with darkening o^ the vision and, if any one 
eat of the sea-rgrape (lit. lake/ grape) and be poisoned by 

15 its bitter principle, the leeches give to drink of the pow 
dered stone and they cure/Him < 


3. Tjffi GEM EMERALD (ZMURI). 

f 

The gem emerald and the agate (akatey) are green in ap- 

pearance, but .-there is in their color a noticeable difference 

20 (lit. differences of choiceness) ; for the emerald emits a spar-' 

kle, while tjfee agate is merely green. They call some of these Dj.26 

stones Ner/onianos and others Dumentianos. The Neroni- 

' 


,1 

p 


. 

ALC (1-15) G"Ar 

1 ony trial> L 3 liquid] L sucus froxn the grinding> L 
4 duejt] L sucus white> L 5 it fills] ms. fillest 5-6 the 
physician] L hi, qui terunt who gives to drink > L 7 dust] 
L sucus has been collected] L elicitus he weighs ... 

8 -<jarise> L 9 and appearance > L 10 lessened] L 

injhutatus 11 It] L hinc autem sucus elicitus after eyes + 
L> itemque 12 its water> L before 12 avails + L ualde 
the short-sighted ...13 vision] L qui aquosa rabie tenentur 
/and if ...15 bitter principle] L qui ex uva marina uehementer 
insaniunt 15 the leeches ...16 cure him] L huius enim lapidis 
sucum medicorum periti talibus tribuunt 18 and the agate] 
L qui est prasinus (misprint in text) 19 in their color] L in eis 
noticeable] L quaedam 20 for the emerald ...21 green > L 
22 ston 1 es> L Dumentianos] L Domitianos 


106 . 

anos has a deep shade of green and is fair to behold; they 
call it Neronianos for this reason : they say that the empe- 
ror Nero (Neron) took oil of a green hue which <....> is liber- ' 
khias, and others say that he collected milk of almonds and 
many other oils of a green color and watered the mountains 5 
where there were a quantity of boulders and stones which 
were thus dyed. Others said (sic) that he took the oil dumen- 
p< 9 tianoniand poured flt into vessels of copper, and when the oil 
stood for a long time'\in these vessels of copper from the rust 
of the copper the oil became green. With it they watered the 10 
mountain whose rocks \yere green in hue, and, when the oil 
came upon them, they became much more green and spark- 
ling. -It is called Dumentianola, however, because Dumentianos 
was a king of that time, the\son of Vespasianos. These were 
they who captured and wasft^d Jerusalem : haughty, cove- 15 
tous and selfish were these kftigs, Neron and Dumentia- 
no25, in their days. Thus they sought to find the precious 
stones. - - , 


ALG 12 Ar \ 

1 has] L lapis amarus est is fair to behold] ^ splendens ac 
uibrans 2. they say]. L putant 3 took> L'V oil .of a 
green hue ...liberkhias] L oleo Spano uiridi u^l Libyrtinb 
4 eay> L he collected ...5 green color] L &mygdalmo, 
aliisusino 5 and watered the mountains] L praecepisse mon- 
tem rigare 6 where ...7 dyed> L 7 others said] L 

alii uero nequaquam, sed aiunt he took ...8 copper] L 

Neronem uel Domitianum oleum in vasis aeneis Nicaenis\inmit- 
tere 11 whose rocks were green in hue> L 12-13 spark- 
ling] L perspicuitate ; thereafter -j- L alii uero minime, sed uoc<atum 
fuisse Neronem quendam memorant antiquum artis pinariae sicien- 
tissimum et in huiusmodi lapidis peritia ualde callentem, qui .ad- 
invenit hanc smaragdi necessariam speciem, et ex ipso Neronianfc^m 
primitus appellari 13 It is called Dumentianon, however] 
L eo uero modo, quo diximus de Neronianis, et de Domitianis ad ; - 
uertendum est 14 king] L imperator of that ...Vospasia-\ 

nos] L post Vespasianum et fratrem suum Titum These , 
were ...15 Jerusalem] L qui (Titus) uastabat Hierosolymam \ 
haughty ...16 Dumentianos] L amatores autem uanarum rerum % 
hi principes extiterunt, Nero scilicet atque Domitianus 17 in \ 
their ...18 stones> L '. '\ 


107 

Others say they are found (sing) in the land of India (Hin- 
doet'i), and are (sing.) brought from thence. Others say it is 
found in Ethiopia in the river Pison. This statement of ours 
that the emerald is found in the river P'ison the Scriptures 
5 confirm ; they say the river P'ison flows around (lit. embra- 
ces) the land of Evilat'. There is the precious gem agate 
(akatey), porphyry (dzoceuli) and the onyx-stone (kapoeti). 
The river P'ison is called the Indos in the language of the 
Romans (P'romini), but the Brahmans (Baramini) and the 

10 Bugaioi (Bogielni) call the P'ison Gangey. The older writers 
(lit. historians) of the Romans (P'romini) call the Ganges 
the river which flows around the land of Evilat', and they 
say that Evilat' is outside of India. It runs along by Ethiopia Dj. 2* 
(Et'iope), which is near the sun's setting, for this is great 

15 Ethiopia. It runs along by Ethiopia, and joins with the ocean 
(ukianos). For the gem dzoceulis p'eri also is found here 
in the river, when earthquakes (lit. upheavals) make paths 
for themselves through the rolling districts ; in such places 
are the Ethiopians settled. 

20 Aquila (Akyla) the translator, however, did not call the green p. 10 
.stone, which is termed in Genesis akat, either a kat or green 
or zmuri (emerald) ; but, since he was well acquainted with 
the language of the Hebrews and with their interpretation, 


5-8 Gen. 2. 11. 

ALC (14 f.) G-Ar 

1 Others say ... 3 P'ison] L sunt et alii smaragdi, unus 
quidem in India nimis Neroniano consimilis, alter uero in Aethio- 
pia, qui et in Phison flumine reperitur 4 the river> L after 
5 P'ison + L ipse est qui 6 the precious gem agate] L lapis 
prasinus 7 porphyry ...onyx stone] L seel et carbunculum illic 
esse testatur 9 Romans] L Graecis ; thereafter + L a barbaris 
uero et Euilaeis Bariminasi Brahmans] L Indis 10 the 

older] L pluresque 11 Romans] L Graecorum 12-13 they 
say ...India] L Euilaeos autem dicunt interiores Indos 13 It 
runs along by Ethiopia > L 16 For the gem. ...19 sett- 

led] L propter quod et carbunculus lapis cursu fluminis hums at- 
tractus in locis proicitur, quae sunt circa Libyam, ubi nominati 
superius Aethiopes commorantur 20 call] L interpretatus est 
21 which ...akat> L 22 well-acquainted] L usus in superficie 
with ...23 Hebrews> L their] L Hebraica 


108 

he found one place in which the name of the stone was writ-, 
ten bdelion, for. which the seventy translators said : from 
hence comes the stone akati , which is of a green color, 
which the Greeks call prasinos, which in the language of 
the Georgians is termed green color (mcuanis p'er). And 5 
Aquila says : here is the gem bdelioni ", and, being trans- 
lated, bdelioni is "savor of sweet odors", which the river 
brings down from the land of India. 

There are many other stones as well like unto the eme- 
rald, which are found each in its own country: some are 10 
sparkling by nature and green ; some are hard and some are 
soft ; some are found in the land of Ethiopia and some in 
the land of India. 

We have this further statement to make, moreover, 
that there is a certain mountain which Nero watered or one 15 
which Dumentianos watered [or] as to what country it is 
in. This mountain is in the country near the Red Sea, when 
one desires to make a journey by vessel to the land 
of India.For there are various countries in India and in these 
many countries there are nine kings and these are the names 20 
of these countries and of their tribes : Alabastrians, Home- 


1-7 Gen. 2. 12 

ALC G* 8 Ar 

1 one place] L in Hebraeo 2 bdelion] L bodallin 2-3 from 
hence ...akati] L ibi inuenitur lapis prasinus 3 which is ... 
green color > L 6 here is] L ibi inuenitur being trans- 
lated > L bdelioni] L bidellion 7 'savor ...odors'} L un- 
guentum quoddam sive incensum 7 tke river> L 8 brings 
down] L defertur the land of> L 9 there are ...13 of 
India] L sunt autem differentiae smaragdi octo, quantum potue- 
runt singuli reperiri, naturaque eius cum sit uiridior et austera, 
tamen hi, qui sunt ex Aethiopia vel India, hepatis, 1 id est iecoris, 
similitudinem referunt before 15 Nero + L aliquando after 
16 watered -f- L sicut sermone uulgatum est 17 in the coun- 
try] L introrsus after Sea + L quod sic appellatur 18 by 
vessel >L 19 For there ...India] L quarum gentium diffe- 
rentiae quam plurimae sunt and in these ... 20 kings] L 
olim quippe Indi in nouem regna fuerant disparati ; thereafter 
4- L sicut fama celebratum est and these are ..,21 tribes] 
L id est 


rites, Aximites, and near them the <A> dulatians, the DJ.S 
Bogi<ans>, the Tavanians (ms. Bogitavanelni) the Asa-' p .n 
beians, the Dibenians, the Leledibenians. Now; however, 
other names have come in (lit. changed) through immigrants 
5 from many places : in the first place, the Hindobeni; these 
came from the land of the Fish-Eaters ; the Sirindibenians, 
who came from the land of Evilat' ; of the other places we 
shall speak when it shall be proper to do so . 

Now, however, we shall speak of the mountain where 

10 the gem emerald is found. It is under the dominion of the 
king of the Romans. The name of the mountain is called 
emerald (zmuriani, i, e. aftoQaydivds). It is like an off- lying 
island and is opposite to Berenike, the point of departure 
for India, when one goes to the Thebaid and lies off in the 

15 sea, about one day's sail by vessel, i. e., about eighty miles 
(milion),and is contiguous to Beronike near the so-called Ivory 
Coast and is the hands of the tribe of the Blemmyes (Bley- 
nielni),who rule many other places as well. At present strange 
heathen tribes extract (lit. cut out) the stone emerald and 

20 put it on the market. 


ALG G M Ar 

1 <A>dulatians, the Bog<ians>, the Tavanians ms. du- 
latelni: bogitavanelni :] L <A>dulitibus (corr. Giirither), 
Bugaeorum, Tauanorum 2 Asabeians] L Isabenorum 3 Di- 
benians] L Libenorum 3 the Dibenians, the Leledibenians] 
L Dibenorum cum Ichthyophagis et Sirindibenorum cum Euilaeis 
3 Now, however ...7 Evilat'] L sed nunc multo plures sunt, 
quippe diuisi a societate, quam inter se prius habebant, Dibeni 
ab lehthyophagis et Sirindibeni ab Euilaeis 7 of the other 

... 8 do so] L de his autem, cum rursus eorum ad loca uentum fue- 
rit, historica narratione referimus after 10 is + L tune 

11 The name ...13 island] L smaragdinum uero sic uocatur na- 
turaliter insula modica 13 the point of departure] L portus 

14-15 and lies off in the sea] L quae a continent! terra Thebaica 
distat after 15 vessel + L prosperum 15 about] ms. son 
>L 16 near ...Ivory Coast] L quae sic appellatur, regioni Ele- 
phantinae nee non et Telmi 18 who rule ...as well> L at 

present ...20 the market] L corruerunt autem mentis hums me- 
talla suntque metalla alia in ipsorum barbaric Blemyorum iuxta 
Telmeos in montibus constituta, quae nunc effodientes barbari 
smaragdos incidunt 


*The property of its color is that it reflects like airiirrof, 
and knowledge of the future is gained by its revelations. 

4. THE GEM JACINTH (IAKINT'EY). 

The color of the jaqinth is shining like' to fire, like to the 
p'anaki in its redness. It is found in the regions of the Car- 5 
thaginians, who are Libyans, in what is called Afrika (Ap*- 
rikey). Others, however say that this gem is found thus : 
p<12it does not show its brightness by day, but by night it 
shines like a lamp from afar and, like a glowing coal, it emits 
a radiance and like a blazing furnace, and this is at once 10 
depressed by its being laid upon the flame (?) and, like a 
glowing coal, it has a mixed (or, completely) white tint. 
Through its luminosity they behold the gem from afar ; some- 
times it is like a glowing coal and sometimes like murk, 
and by its appearance they recognize the color of this gem 15 
and go and find it by the brightness it emits. He who carries 
Dj . 32 it and does not know what stone it is wears it outside and 
not within his garment. Through the shining of its light the 
luminosity it emits reaches distant places. They call it 'glow- 


ALGG 12 Ar 

1 its color] L huius lapidis after mirr.or + L dicitur et 
ab his, qui fabulosa confingunt 2 and knowledge ...reve- 
lations] L praescius esse futurorum 3 jacinth] L-carbunculo 
et passim 4 shining like to fire ...5 in its redness] L ru- 
bricae nimis acutissimae like to the p'anaki> L it is 

found] L nascitur 8 show its brightness] L videri before 
9 emits + L naturaliter 10 and like ...11 white tint> L 
13 through its luminosity ...16 it emits] L et bora quidem 
sicut carbo ignis accendi, hora uero desinere, ita ut splendorem 
eius, qui hunc lapidem quaerunt, eminus intuentes ob hoc ipsum, 
quod per interualla comparet et rursus extinguitur, eum esse cog- 
noscant pergentesque ad eius fulgorem ita reperiant 17 and 
does not know ...it is] L eum latere non potest 18 wears it 
...19 places] L nam quibuslibet vestimentis occulat, splendor 
extra vestimenta conlucet before they + L unde 


-ill- 

ing coal* (i.e. carbo, ebflgal), because such is its light and 
brilliant sheen. 

The property of the gem jacinth is this that, should one 
be given to drink its dust or drink what has been ground 
5 off it, his soul is awakened to just words and, if any one 
take it in his mouth, he will dispense a just and upright 
judgment. It is like a spark but just fallen out of the fire. 
There is another stone like to this which is called chalce- 
dony (kark'edon) : in its color it is like these gems, for they 

lOfind it in these same places. Some thing equally wonderful in ap- 
pearance is that gem which is called in the sacred scriptures 
dahnag, (green), which comes from the river P'ison.This gem is 
found in Africa (Ap'rikia) also, and the manner of its finding 
is thus ; the river P'ison debouches into the sea to thesoutb- 

15 ward <and> by the western side of the ocean, for the 
ocean surrounds all the quarters of heaven and in the west p. 13 
the river P'ison joins with the ocean, near the land of the 
Libyans. For thus saith the sacred scripture: A river 
went forth from Eden (edemif), and was divided into 

20 four branches (lit. heads) : the name of the one is P'ison, 
which encircleth the whole land of Evilat'. There there is 
gold and the gold of this land is good, and there are (sing.) 
the carbuncle (ant'raki) and the porphyry (dzoceuli) and the 
onyx-stone (kapoeti). 


19-24 Gen. 2. 10-12 

ALGG^Ar 

1-2 because ...sheen] L ob hanc scilicet causam : thereafter + 
L parumper autem et ceraunius ita lapis uocatus huic uidetur 
esse consimilis. dicunt autem ceraunium quidam et uinarium, quod 
instar uini flaui coloris existat 3 The property ...7 the 
fire> L 8 another stone] L nihilominus 10 Something- 

equally wonderful ...12 P'isonjL nee mirum,quod diuina scriptura 
in Phison eum (sc. chalcedonium) flumine esse pronuntiat 
12 This gem ...14 is thus] L cum possit et in Africa reperiri 
after 17 P'ison + L ut diximus after 19 Eden + L ad irrigan- 
dum paradisum after 19 and -j- L inde 20 branches ] L 
initia 21 which] L iste est, qui 22 good] L optimum 

23 porphyry] L lapis prasinus and the onyx stone > L. 


lift 


5. THE GEM SAPPHIRE (SAP'IRONI), 

The gem which is called sapphire is of the color of por 
phyry (dzoceuli). Like porphyry, the gem sapphire is. of 
a black color similar to the color of the bnobi. There are many 
Dj.34 other gems similar to the sapphire ; the one they call basi- 5 
likey (i.e. paoifawfj), the others k'riisey (i.e. xgvofj) and the 
<a>tikey (i.e. 'Amx^), which are not so fair to behold : 
their colors are somewhat less beautiful. As I think, they say 
that these are in India and Ethiopia, and they stand in order 
round the altar (lit. place of idols) of Dionysus (Dyoneysesa), 10 
although it is not credible what they say, that there are 365 
steps (bat'mon) ; all are of sapphire,and each of these is a com- 
plete step (bat'mon) of sapphire stone and they are joined 
one to another by chains. For this is the marvellous stone of 
kings, and fair and desirable to behold ; hence some give it the 15 
. name of alek'siponon (i.e. afoglnovog). 

The property of this gem is that when one takes its dust 
and mixes it with milk, it heals scabs, swellings and tumors. 
It is written in the law of Moses that, when he beheld his 
p.14 vision on the mount, there stood beneath his feet a heavenly 20 
body made of sapphire stones . 


20-21 Exod. 24. 10 

ALC(l)G 18 Ar 

2 the gem... 4 bnobi] L Sapphirus lapis dicitur in modum pur- 
pUrae, quam blattam uocitant, cuius est pressior species alter 
4 are -f L vero 5 the one ...7<a>tikey] ms. tikey : L est 
enim in ipsis regalis auri punctis intermicans 8 their colors ... 
beautiful] L sicut purus 1116 lapis 8 as I think ... 9 there 

are] L et hie fortassis esse dicitur 9 and they stand ...round > L 
10 the altar ...Dionysus] L propter templum Liberi patris apud 
Indos 12 all are ...sapphire stone] L omnes ex lapide sapphi- 
ro 13 and they are joined ...14 by chains> L 14 for this 
...15 of kings] L in ornamentis autem suis et monilibus reges ntun- 
tur eo uel maxime, quia mirabilis est atque pulcherrimus atque 
gratiosus 15 hence some ...16 alek'siponon] L unde et non- 
nulli uocaverunt eum monilis ornatum 17 the property of 
this gem is] L pellit etiam dolores when one ...18 tumors] 
L nam si teratur cum lacte, medela scabiosis et ulcerosis efficitur 
linitus super loca, quae fuerint uulneribus asperata ; after tumor + 
ms. and a swelling 20 there stood ..21 stones] L ueluti super 
lapide sapphire fuisse declaratam 


H8- 


6. THE GEM JASPER (IASPINI). 

The 1 jasper is a gem. whose appearance is similar to that 

the emerald. It is found in the immediate neighborhood of 

the river T'ermagondos and near lamant'isa not that which 

5 is in Cyprus, for in nature there are many places which they 

call Amat'usion. 

Its appearance is green in color, like the emerald but 
to a slight extent like that of the bnobi and from within it . 
emits a green color like that of copper rust. Those, make use 
10ofit(/#. adorn themselves with it) who desire to adorn 
their persons, as is stated in the fables. Dj.36 

There is another stone, redder than the waters of the sea 
<and> darker than flowers. 

There is yet another stone, which is to be seen in the caves 

15 of the mountains of [S|ide[sia], which are in Phrygia. Its 

color is that of blood and like that of mother-of-pearl (lit. 

root of pearl) ; it is brighter, of the color of wine. It is like 

the gem amethyst, but it is ruddier. 

They are neither of one color nor of one potency ; there 
20is another stone which is brighter and like to flame, and 


ALG 12 Ar 

2 Jasper] L iaspide 3 in the immediate neighborhood] L 
apud ostia 4 T'ermagondos] L Thermodontis laman- 

t'isa] L Amathunta 7 Its appearance ...emerald] L sub 
smaragdo est interuirescens but to ...8 bnobi] L sed pb- 
tunsior et obscurior 8 and from within... 9 green color] L 
interiusque corpus habet uiride 9 Those make use ...11 fa- 
bles] L delectantur etiam phantasiae, id est speculationes, huic 
insidere sicut asserunt, qui fabulosa commemorant. 12 There 
is another ...13 than flowers] L est et alia iaspis albidior 

quam mare, flore uero tincturaque pressior 14 is to be seen> L 
15 mountains, ...are] L mentis, ...est 15-16 Its color ... 16 mo- 
ther-of-pearl] Lreperitur similis sanguinis cochleae 15 bright- 
er ...114.1 smoke] L rarior est et albidior quam aer fumi- 
<nec> nimis effulgens nee impar ; thereafter + L item caeru- 
leae uibrationis, ueluti si tempore hiemis de terra uapor aut nebula 
austro desinente consurgat. alia, quae glaciei similis est 


- iii -* . . 

[is] whiter and more brilliant than smoke. And some of the 
fables say that the stone makes people rational. This is 
found on the borders of Georgia (K'art'lis) and Hyrcania 
(Gorganet's) and the land of the Caspians, where are the 
tribes (or, heathen). 5 

There is another (///.second) jasper, not of great brilliancy, 
and of a green color and there are speckles inside the stone 
and another gem jasper also which they call upavlios (opal), 
p. 15 It is like snow and like the foam of the sea, as though one had 
mixed blood with milk, as the Massagetae (Mask'at'i) drink 10 
and, as they tell us, those who tind it bring fear on the vil- 
lages or cultivated fields. 


7. THE GEM LIGURE (LYGYRJONI). 

j 

Where the ligure is found we were unable to discover, 
either .among those who began to express this nature (i.e., 15 
the natural scientists), or among others of the ancients who 
have displayed zeal in this matter, but we have heard this 
name, which they call ligure. Those who speak correctly 
and use well established expressions (lit. language), call it 
ligure, and, as I think, this ligure, as we find it in the 20 
Dj.38 divine books, has had its name (plur.) changed. 


ALG M Ar 

1 and some ... 2 rational] L ab his, qui fabulosa confingunt, 
phantasiis dicitur esse remedium 3 on the borders ...Hyr- 
cania] L ab' Hiberis et pastoribus Hyrcanorum 4 and the 
land of the Caspians] L qui circa Caspium solum lacumque 
consistunt 6 There is ... 7 the stone > L 8 upavlios] L 
oppalius 10 drink] L potare sunt soliti after 11 us + L qui 
fabulosa referunt those who find ...12 fields] L bestiae in 
agro metuimt aliqua-portenta. 15 those who ...this nature] L 
a physiologis, id est naturarum scrutatoribus 17 but we have 
...18 ligure] L invenimus autem laggurium sic appellatum lapi- 
dem 18 those who ...20 ligure] L quern nonnulli pressiore 
Jocutione liggurium uocant 20 as] L lortassis as we 
find... 21 changed] L quoniam quidem diuinae scripturae nonnulla 
nomina aliter immutarunt 


- US 

For they say that the gem emerald (?muri) is green in 
color (i. e. KQaaivog) and different names are given to diffe- 
rent stones ; they called the lygyrion lagyrion. Although 
the localities where it is found are hidden from us, we infer 
5 that it is found in the Thebais (T'ebaiss), concerning which 
they said that there are cliffs there, and that in these clilfs 
the gems are quarried. They call this stone asklepion from 
a king of the Egyptians and there are in this stone as it were 
figures like veins, similar to the stone which they call keri- 

lOnon.And these veins are of a green color and we are to under- 
stand that these veins are in the rock from which the gem is 
quarried. When the gem is cut out of the. cliff, the veins 
appear still more beautiful because of their criss-crossing. 
And when one has in very truth made investigations about p. 16 

15 this name, lygyros is the name of an animal which they 
call lygyron, which is. of the color of the wild cow, like to 
the red heifer,and on the tip of its tail it has a bunch of hair 
which gives off a greenish reflection. It is called lygyroz, 
(i. e. Myyos OVQOS) which being interpreted is lygyrioni- 

20 tail. 


ALG 18 Ar 

3 they called ...lagyrion] L et liggurus quidem uel etiam 
laggurus, si ipse sit ligyrium 4 are hidden] L nescitur we 
infer] L arbitrati sunt befo're 5 Thebais + L superiore 
6 said] L affirmant that there are cliffs ...8 Egyptians] 
L aliquos lapides ex lapide hoc in aede Asclepii, quae sic appel- 
latur, in Memphi Aegyptia reperiri and there are ...9 ke- 
rinon] L in quibus sunt ueluti notae intermicantes, non sicut ophi- 
tae, sed habentes puncta iuxta cerinum lapidem sic uocatum 
10 And these veins ...13 criss-crossing] L puncta sunt ui- 

ridantia ita, ut intelligamus in profundo lapidis huius uenam esse 
lectissimam 14 And when ...15 this name] L sed et adhuc 
lucidius et speciosius haec petra uidetur sumpsisse cognomen 
15 lygyros ...16 lygyron] L explanatur enim liggurus a quodam 
animali,quod liggium nominatur 16 which is ...17 red heifer] 
L habens colorem pulli bubali uel buculae rufae 17 and on the 
tip ...18 greenish reflection] L cuius cauda modica est et 
habet puncta quaedam uiridantia 18 It is called ...20 tail] L, 
propter quod et lapis liggurus idem liggi caudam uocitatur 


lie ^ 

feut I was astonished as I laboriously worked out from the 
divine scriptures the precise adornment of beauty, such as 
they made for a king in his crown and in the tunic of the 
priest and how these precious stones are found and how 
they set them as brilliants, more particularly the jasper, 5 
as a most special adornment, in which was the power of 
foretelling future events (lit. marvel). We have mentioned 
above the jacinth, as I say, and the emerald, the amethyst 
and the agate and the beryl (bivrili) and the .chalcedony, 
as these gems are called. 10 

The gem jacinth is not mentioned anywhere, although 
it is most marvellous and precious, and, as I think, by that 
which they call lygyron in the sacred ; books they mean the 
Dj.40 jacinth. The gem jacinth is of many types, and is thus more 
precious than many stones. For in the divine scriptures it. 15 
is stated that they make the adornment of hyacinth (ia- 
kint'isa) and purple. We find the color of the gem 'hyacinth 
(iagund) is red and of the shade of honey and the hue of 
ashes. There is another stone similar to this, like the color 
of the sea, and yet another which they call rodyos ($061-20 
aloe;) and another which they call natibos (vdnfios-nativus) 


ALG 12 ArC 

before 1 astonished + L ttehementer as I laboriously worked 
out> L 1-2 the divine scriptures ...10 are called] L cur 
scriptura diuina curans ad ornatum decor emque pulchritudinis re- 
galium sertorum et uestimentorum pontificalium uti lapidibus 
pretiosis et nonnulloram, qui multum erant noti manifestique, 
commemorans (carbunculi dico et smaragdi, amethysti et achati, 
berylli et chrysolithi) before 11 the gem + L in horum di- 
numeratione 12 and, as I think] L ut animaduertamus by 
that which ...13 the jacinth] L ne ligyrium forsitan hunc diui- 
na scriptura cognominat 14 and is thus ... 15 stones] L quanto 
enim quis invenitur colore profundior, tanto est aliis necessarior 
15 For ...19 ashes] these two sentences in inverse order in L 
17 We find ...6 red] L hyacintho uero uel callaino purpureus color 
est aliquanto consimilis 18 and of the shade ...19 ashes >L 
19 There is ..20 the sea] L et praecipuus quidem lapis hyacinthus 
thalassites appellatur, eo quod tranquilli maris similitudinem refe- 
rat after 20 rodyos -j- L alius oppalius 21 and another 

...117.2 k'avnieyos> L 


117 

and another which is like to the color of water which they 
call k'avnieyos (%avviaios), and many other stones as well p.l' 
are similar to this gem in their whiteness, and others besi- 
des of different colors. These stones are found in the inner 
5 regions of the heathen, which are the Scythians. 

As the ancients say, Scythia lies in the districts to the 
north, in which are the tribes of the <G>eti and Yni 
[LJarii and Arani unto the Germans and the Amazons .Beyond 
them lies a waste, which they call Great Scythia. There 

10 there j s a gorge, great in depth and dark, into which no 
man can descend. Mountains wall it round about : their sum- 
mits are massive cliffs, and sheer from the base to the crest 
of the peaks. Should one wish to take his stand on them 
and look down, it is impossible to behold the Jacinth since, 

15 in view of the great depth, darkness shrouds the bottom 
and there are great terrors there. 

In the depths of this dark abyss, they say, is the gem ja- 
cinth, and the men who come by the command of kings 
(lit. royal persons) to find and bring back (or, obtain) the gem 

20 Jacinth, since they cannot descend into the gorge because 
of its depth, yet through the fear evoked by the commands 
of the kings they are eager to find the gem. Thereupon theyDj.42 


ALCG 12 Ar 

2 and many ...3 whiteness] L rursus alius perileucius 
3 and others ...4 colors > L 4-5 the inner regions of the 

heathen] L interiors barbaric 6 say] L soliti sunt ...appellare 
6-7 the districts to the north] L cunctam septentrionalem 
plagam 7 the tribes of > L <G>eti and Yni, [L]arii and 
Arani ms. etelni daiinelni : L Gothi et Dauni, Uenni quoque et Arii 
8 lies> L 9 which they call> L 10 anddark> L 11 moun- 
tains ...13 peaks] L montibus namque saxosis hinc atque 
inde uallatur before 14 look + L tamquam de muris It 

is impossible ...16 terrors there] L solum conuallis perui- 
dere non possit sed a profunditate caligo tenebrosa ueluti chaos 
alicuius occurrat 18 come] L mittuntur the command of> L 
after kings + L iuxta comrnanentibus 19 to find ...20 ja- 
cinth] L ad istorum lapidum perquisitionem 20 since they 
...21 depth> L 21 yet through ...22 the kings] L se- 

cundum dispensationem necessitatis sibi commissae. they 

are ...the gem> L 22-118.1 Thereupon they bring up> L. 


118 

bring up and slaughter lambs, flay them and cast the car- 
casses into the depths. The gems adhere to the flesh and* 
so they say, the eagles which nest in the crags, unea- 
sy because of the hunger of their fledgelings, scent the odor * 
of the carcass, descend into the blind darkness of the abys- 5 
ses and bring up the carcasses of the lambs on to the 
summits of the mountains. 

As the eagles devour the carcasses of the lambs, the gem 
jacinth remains there in the inaccessible places (sing.) of 
the mountains. The men who have come thither to find the 10 
gem jacinth mark and observe the place, and sit on the sum- 
mits of the mountains :They see the place where the eagles 
are devouring the carrion, and sit and watch till they devour 
it, and when they fly away and depart, then the men come* 
collect the gems and clean them from the carcass which 1 5 
the eagles have brought up, take them away and hand them 
over to the kings who sent them thither. 

In this wise they find the jacinth, which itself is multico- 
lored and precious and has the following property. When 
one takes this stone and lays it on glowing coals, the coals 20 
are extinguished and the stone is in no wise harmed nor even 


ALG 12 AT 

after 1 cast -f- L e saxis 2 into the depths] L in illud chaos 
conuallis imraensum 3 so they say -f L with preceding clause 
which nest] L sursum morantes uneasy ...5 fledgelings > 
L 4 scent] L accepto ...odore 5 into the blind ...abysses> 
L 6 carcasses] L decoriatos on to ...7 moun tains > L 
8 As the ...lambs] L exedunt 8 the gem jacinth] L 

lapides 9 the inaccessible places] L summis 10 The 

men] L damnati ergo who have ...11 jacinth] L qui per 

liuiusce modi capturam after 13 sit + ms. the preceding words 
beginning with 'mountains 'by dittography :> L 11 mark and 
observe ..17 them thither] L intuentes, ubi sunt ductae 

agnorum carnes ab aquilis, eunt iliuc et inuenientes lapides af- 
ferunt 18 In this wise ...jacinth> L w hich itself 

...19 property] L omnes autem lapides isti, cuiuscumque sub 
diuersitate coloris existunt, cum sint pretiosi, tamen hanc ha- 
bent eflicaciam 20 glowing] L uehementibus the coals 

i.. 119.1 heated] k transposes these two cola 21-119.1 nor even 
heated > L 


119 . 

heated. Not only this, but if one should wrap it up in a stole 
or a rag, and should place it on the embers, he himself suf- 
fers no harm from the blazing fire, while the fragment of 
cloth in which the gem is enveloped and placed on the coals 
5 likewise suffers not the slightest harm from the fire, even 
though the coals are glowing fiercely. This, too, they say, 
that to women in childbirth, when they bring the stone 
near to them, it gives patience and easy travail and dis- 
pels phantasmagoria as well. 

1 8. THE GEM AGATE (AKATI). p. 19 

The gem agate is very white in color, although it is less 
valuable than the jacinth. Its appearance, however, is re- 
markable, and it is completely white all around, like ivory Dj.44 
and like marble. This gem agate is found in the country of 

15 Scythia. The potency of the might which is inherent in this 
gem agate is the type of its color, which in appearance re- 
sembles that of the lion. They rub up its dust in water and 
bathe (/i/.anoint) wounds and injuries from beasts and it heals 
the wound, the bite of an adder and of a scorpion. It 

20 is the custom to say thus, that the agate is lion colored 
(i.e., tawny). 


ALG M Ar 

after 1 up + L diligenter 2 he himself ...3 fire] L manu 

retinens ipse quidem calore cruciabitur 4 and placed on 
the coals> L 5 likewise suffers ...the fire] L nullo mo- 
do laeditur aut aliqua ustione uexatur 6 They say ...8 tra- 
vail] L fertur autem lapis iste utilis esse mulieribus quatenus 
onere partus absque difficultate liberentur 11 the gem agate 
...12 jacinth] L Achates autem lapis est aestimatus esse perileu- 
cius, qui post hyacinthum lapidem ponitur after 12 remar- 
kable + L colore caeruleus 13 like ivory and like marble > 
L 14 in the country of Scythia] L circa Scythias 15 the 
potency ...is inherent> L in this gem ...17 lion] L 
est autem in lapidibus istis achates colore leonino 18 wounds 
and injuries from beasts] L loca and it heals ...19 a scor- 
pion] L quae morsu contracta sunt uiperae uel scorpii ccterorum- 
que serpentium, uenena depellit 19 It is ,.. 20 lion-colored] 
L dico autem achatem, qui leonis speciem praefert 


120 
9. THE GEM AMETHYST (AMET'YSTONI). 

The gem amethyst glows all around like a blazing fire 
in which there is a white brilliancy and it has also the color 
of wine. Its fire is brighter in the centre of the gem. It is 
found in the borders of Libya. There are some which are 5 
purer than the jacinth and there is one which is similar 
to mother-of-pearl (lit. root of pearl) in the regions of losi- 
teysi (LeSOaofais), which is Libya, whereof they are the dis- 
trict extending to the sea. Its name is applied to it in accor- 
dance with its power and potency, for those who look on 10 
it become drunk and are cognizant beforehand of winter 
and rain from the moisture of the winds. 

10. THE GEM BLOODSTONE (DZOCEULI). 

20 The bloodstone is a gem regarding which some say that 
it is called the <chryso> beryl, for it ha.s a blaze of golden 15 
color round about, like a girdle in the shape of a vein. It is 
found in n well by the cliff of Ezramenidos in Babylon 
(Babilovn). Both Babylon and the depression in the cliff 
are called Ak'emenida. For they say that the father of Cy- 
rus (Kyroz) the king was hight Ak'emenios, as certain 20 


ALG 12 Ar 

2 The gem amethyst ...fire] L Amethystus lapis est erga suum 
circulum flammiferum quiddam profundius micans 2 in which 
...3 the gem] L splendor autem eius est albidior, e medio corpore 
veluti uini flaui speciem referens 4 it is found ...5 Libya] L 
qui forma diuersus et hie, ut opinor, in Libyae montibus gignitur 
There are ...6 jacinth] L alter enim hyacintho inundissimo 
similis est 6 and there is ...7 mother-of-pearl] L alter uero 
amphicochlo 7 in the regions ...9 to the sea] ^ fit autem ipse 
in parte Libyae circa litus maris 9 Its name ...11 drunk> L ; 
thereafter + L hi uero, qui fabulis credurit, aiunt 11 and are 
cognizant ...12 winds] L eum praecidere tempestates et 
pluuias, cum australes uenti perflauerint 13 bloodstone] L chry- 
solitho 14-15 say ...it is called] L uocaverunt 15 <chryso> 
beryl] ms. beryl ; L chrysoberyllum 16 round about ...vein> 
L 17 well by the cliff] L puteali petra of Ezramenidos in 
Babylon> L 19 Ak'emeniosi] L Achaemeneus 


. 121 

writers tell us from books. There is also another gem of pur- 
ple and of a green hue, and the force of its potency is as D J- 
follows ; when the doctors give its dust to drink, it is bene- 
ficial lor those whose stomachs are cramped or whose bel- 
5 lies are swollen. 

11. THE GEM BERYL (BYVRILIONI). 

The gem beryl is all white, like a cloud : it seems to emit 
a gleam as of clear water from within ; it is somewhat dar- 
ker than the gem amethyst, and purer than the hyacinth. 

10 It is found at the base of Mt. Taurps. If one holds it to the 
sun (lit. eye of the sun), it shines forth in the color of glass, 
like a grain of millet. There is another beryl as well, which 
is like the pupil of the eye of the dragon, and another beryl, 
too, is like wax, and another which is of an appearance as 

15 though forged out ; it is found in the bed of the river Eu- 
phrates. 

12. THE GEM ONYX (P'RTSKHILI). 
The gem onyx is red and somewhat dark, Its tint is 


ALG 12 Ar 

1 from books > L another gem ...2 green hue] L chry- 
soprasus lapis 2 and the force ... as follows > L 3 when the 
doctors ...5 are swollen] L hie stomachicis et colicis nee non et 
coeliacis tritus et epotus saluberrimus approbatur 7 is all 

white like a cloud] L glauci, id est caesii, coloris est it seems 
...8 from within] L marinae tincturae similis et aeris 8 it is 
somewhat ...9 the hyacinth] L amethysti et paederotis habens 
speciem et aquations, id est albidioris, hyacinth! 10 after Mt. 
+ L quiuocatur holds] L uoluerit apponere ' 11 the color of 
glass] ins. it in violet color 11 it shines forth ...12 millet]. 
L uidetur ueluti uitrei minuta intrinsecus habere perlucicla 13 pu- 
pil of the eye] L pupillis oculorum and another ..14 like 
wax> L 14 of an appearance ...16 forged out] L ueluti 
coralli speciem magis exhibens 15 It is found] L uis a est ad fin. 
in the bed] L iuxta uiam 17 onyx] L onychio is red ...dark] 
L flauum nimis ostentat col orem 18 Its tint is mixed >L 


122 

i 

mixed : with rejoicing do the brides of kings adorn themselves 
p. 21 with it, and those of wealthy magnates. They make a goblet 
from the gem onyx. There are other gems, too, called onyx, 
similar to it, whose color is like to the honey-comb ; some 
say that this gem is created by congealing in water (pi.) 5 
and the stone is termed onyx, as those say who declare that 
the nail of a man is like marble and because of the blood 
it emits a rosy hue, and some people who found the marble 
stone in the sacred places erroneously called it the gem onyx, 
>j. p. 48 in view of the purity and smoothness of the marble. 10 

These are the twelve stones which are inscribed in the 
tablet ot the law, which were ordained to be placed on the 
breast of the high priest. I in my feebleness have set forth 
what I found stated concerning their nature, the differences 
and the potencies which are in them and the places also from 15 
whence they come or how they can be found, in accordance 
with my (lit. our) ability ; I assumed this labor in my mind : 
in my boldness have I ordered and inscribed in accordance 
with thy command the names of each one of these stones. 


AL (1-17) G 12 (1-10) Ar (1-10) 

1 with rejoicing ... adorn themselv es] L delectari... fe- 
runt 2 they make ...onyx] L quae in pocula sua transfe- 

rentes utuntur hoc lapide 3 called onyx] L onychitae qui 
aequiuoce nuncupantur 4 it] L cerae honey-comb] L 

mellis 5 this gem ...in water] L hos ...ex guttis aquae con- 
solidari 6 and the stone ...onyx] L onychitas autem natural! 
ration! cognominant before 7 man -f L urbanorum and be- 

cause ...8 rosy hue] L quadam mixtione sanguinis obrubescentes 
8 who found ...9 onyx] L lapidem marmoreum qui est ex loco 
Docimii 9 called] L uocitant after onyx onyx] L onychiten 
10 purity and smoothness] L albedinis puritatem of the mar- 
ble> L 11 which are inscribed ...12 the law> L 13 breast] 
L superlmmerali in my feebleness ..19 of these stones] 

L ex diuersis auctoribus, qui de naturis horum dixere lapidum, 
constat inuentio ; quorum, sicut inuestigare potuimus, tarn spe- 
cies quam loca nee non et potentias inspectionis eorum interim 
breviter adnotantes singulorum lapidum nqmina consequenter ex- 
pressimus. "With p. 122. 17 the Latin text breaks off; p. 12.3, 5 
Djanasvili's text ends. 


123 


Now I shall commence to recount in accordance with my 

power the potency and appearance of these gems, as to what 

name of which tribe can be inscribed on each stone, or the 

image of what tribe and clan this portends to us, or what 

5 meaning and interpretation there is in them. 


1. THE GEM SARDIONI. (SARDION). p. 22 

The gem sardion is the first in the square and oracular 
breastplate of the law. Upon it is inscribed the name of 
Reuben, the firstborn son of Jacob, and this is the sense 

10 and interpretation of the stone, for the gem sardion is 
found in Babylon, and Babylon, being interpreted, is 'di- 
vision' and * dispersal'. 

Of a verity, justly and truly is the name of Reuben inscri- 
bed on this gem sardion, which is found in Babylon, since 

15 it was in Babylon during the tower-building that there came 
over the first race a dispersal and a division ; so, too, to 
Reuben as a result of his transgressions there occurred a 
dispersal and a division in his mind (pi.), through the fault 
of his passidns, and he was cursed by Jacob his father. 

20 There is a second justification as well in the great stone 
sardion, for by means of its dust wounds are healed, just 
as Reuben healed (lit. revived) the wound of his trespasses, 
for he did well by Joseph his brother and saved him from 
being slain by his brethren. 

25 And Moses, when invoking he spake the blessings on the 
children of Israel, said thus : Let Reuben live and not 
die ; for the patriarch Jacob cursed Reuben and said : 
Thou defiledst my couch like water ;boil thou it not . 
But what he saith, boil not, , in Hebrew he says : Boil P- 23 

30 it not and do not grow . Moses, however, says in the bles- 
sings about Reuben : From God he received the power 
as a high-priest and as a prophet and as one inspired by 
the spirit, who did a work of charity for Joseph ; he, too, 
relates the sin of Reuben. 


7-8Exod. 28. 17 *5-16 Gen. 11. 1-9 18-19 Gen. 35. 22 23-24 Gen. 37. 

21-22 26-7 Deut. 33. 6. 28 Gen, 49. -4. 


124 

And after his sin his just action brought Reuben for- 
giveness for his transgression. As a high priest might, he bles- 
sed him and said : Let Reuben live and not die . These 
are the aspects and the interpretations of the meaning of 
the gem sardion and of the name of Reuben being written 5 
thereon. Let it suffice that we have said this much : let 
us now pass over to the discussion of the second stone. 


2. THE GEM TOPAZ (TBAZIONI). 

After this is the topaz, which is the second stone : on it 
is inscribed the name of Symeon. 10 

There is this gem, as I have said above, the topaz, a gem of 
the city of Tbazi. This city is in India. This gem topaz is 
fair and marvellous to behold, and it blazes forth from it- 
self a brightness like to glowing charcoal. It is a ruddy (or, 
reddish) stone which the stone-cutters found and sold to the 15 
Alabastrian merchants : these took it to the city of Thebes, 
and they received for it a greater price than they gave. The 
Thebans took the gem topaz and bestowed it on the king, 
p. 24 who was at that time in the city of Thebes, and the king 
took possession of the gem topaz, and placed it in his crown 20 
just in the middle of the forehead. 

The interpretation of the gem is as follows : Judas Iscariot, 
who became the betrayer, possessed the precious stone and 
was for a long time a sharer in the life of our Lord,yet because 
of his evil passion for the love of gain and avarice, he was 25 
not able to endure the test, but through his evilness arid ava- 
rice he became stupid and unreliable, just as these stone-cut- 
ters, and understood not the meaning (lit. knowledge) of the 
precious gem, our Lord Jesus Christ, but he sold the Lord un- 
to the scribes and Pharisees, who are of the race of Symeon,and 30 
Him whose price it was impossible to estimate, the betrayer 
Judas handed over to the chief priests, and received some 
small price, which is that which they gave him thirty pieces 
of silver. The scribes and the Pharisees, however, and the 


3 Deut. 33. 6 9 Exod. 28. 17 29 Mt. 26. 14. 

A 


125 

high-priests in their great jealousy and pride and hardness 
of heart, handed over their' precious gem and the Lord of 
all created things to the hands of the civil authorities to 
Pontius Pilate, even as did these Thebans, and these cru- 
5 cified the Lord of Life, that is, Him whom they offered as 
a gift to the church. So likewise did the Thebans offer it 
to the king, and the king received the precious gem topaz 
and placed it just in the midst of his brow. 
So, too, the church, the spouse of the great king, the Son p. 25 

lOof God, received Him who was rejected of the builders ; just 
as the king, she sets it in her own crown and in those of crow- 
ned persons, and it is boldly stamped with the sign of life 
as a treasure-house in the midst of the forehead. 
For Christ is the head and the church his lifhb and the 

15 bride of the great bridegroom who is proclaimed at all times 
through the sign of the cross, and she has taken it up and 
hath great joy : impressed '(lit. sealed) by its image in the 
midst of the forehead, just as the diadem 'd monarch once 
took the gem topaz : and placed it in his crown just in the 

20 middle of his forehead. 

And as we have said, that when the physician takes the 
stone and gives it to drink with water for his needs (or, 
purposes), it gives forth a hue of the dust which does not 
resemble its redness, whence sicknesses are healed ; but 

25 white, like milk, is its dust, and as many vessels as one de- 
sires are filled with the dust of the stone topaz, and many 
a cure of illnesses is accomplished and of afflicted eyes. 
Its circumference is just the same as it was and, when one 
weighs it, one finds it undiminished. It remains, however, 

30 as it always was and they fill many vessels with its dust, 
wherewith many afflictions are healed. 

In the same wise now do we also behold that from the 
blood (pi.) of Christ there likewise cometh about the healing 
of souls and of all flesh who receive it. For from the blood 

35 which is of the flesh of Christ we who are healed by it do not 


1-2 Mt. 26. 15. 2Mt,27.2 4-5 Mt. 27. 22-50 10 Ps. 118/22 : Mk, 12. 10 
14-15 Ephes. 5. 30-31 
A 

25 dust] ms, tribe 


become blood-red in hue, but our souls and our flesh are 
p. 26 transformed into purity and whiteness, when the rust of 
sin is cleansed from us and we become as snow and as wool, 
as it is said : They are made to escape who come forth from 
the desert, who are white as snow and as a laved fleece . 5 
Just as the gem topaz, which exudes its liquor and abides 
in the same aspect (lit. mind), so too our Lord was in no 
way diminished by His appearance in the flesh nor lacking 
in aught, but Himself having undergone every trial and 
perfect (lit. full) in every respect as to this our human nature, 10 
He traversed all sorrow, save that He was not cleansed 
from sin, and brought life in every way to this humanity 
and we do all receive from Him the Holy Spirit and power 
and wisdom and knowledge. 

All of us who believe receive these gifts and great ones 15 
from Him, nor does He feel want in aught : as the divine 
word said by the mouth of John (lovane) the evangelist : 
We have all received from his fulness . 

This is the precious jewel and the corner-stone with se- 
ven gems (o/ 1 , eyes), which f illeth each and all with the illu- 20 
mination of its knowledge, nor does it itself lessen in aught 
through the light of its brilliancy, but remains and abides 
as it is. As the light of one lamp kindles a thousand and ten 
thousand and yet more lamps, and by the extension of light 
upon them and the illumination of them all is itself no 25 
whit diminished in its radiance, nor doth it ever fail. 
p. 27 Thus Christ also from his fulness illumines, from 
which fulness naught is ever lacking nor aught diminished, 
but He abides in His same fulness, and fills and illumi- 
nates others. 


3. THE GEM EMERALD (ZMURI). ^ 30 

The third gem is the emerald (zmuri), whereon was in- 


4-5 Is. 1. 18 and Apoc, 7. 14 18 Jo. 1 16 19-20 Zech. 3. 9. 31 Exod. 28. 17 
A 

15 and great ones] possibly we should insert here dzghuent'agifts 


^in- 
scribed the name of Levi,for the tribe of Levi had the priest- 
hood, who were called Levites, who were from Merari (Me- 
rarey) and Kohath (Kaat'ey) and Gershon (Gersoney-ms. 
Get'soney), This marvellous tribe was inscribed on the gem 
5 emerald. 

For the gem emerald is green and brilliant : on being 
drilled through with great labor and patience, the green 
color becomes weak and pale. Many of this tribe held the 
priesthood by great toil and virtue, whose souls, being 

10 illumined by their diligence, shone with the graces of di- 
vinity. 

For John also was of the tribe of Levi, patient in toil 
like to the virtue of his race ; he expelled his passions by his 
holy virgin purity* and made himself of a green color by 

15 the gauntness and by the great virtue of his (ms. thy) toil, 
for different were the colors of the emerald stones. Those 
which are found in the east are very dark in their greenness, p. 
while those found in the west are still darker and that which 
comes from the river P'ison displays a radiance mixed (or, 

20 strong) in its greenness. As is the true emerald, so also is 
the high-priesthood ; in each and every aspect are reprodu- 
ced in its face the deeds and labors of its steadfastness and 
by due ordainment it hath the word of guidance for the 
teaching of the people. 

25 And, if it ever appeared blackened in its color, it proclai- 
med the hue of its sins and the evils of its teaching and if 
it appeared white, it proclaimed good deeds and a better 
and a loving guidance ; for thus saith the prophet : Be you 
consoled, be you consoled : let you priests say to my people 

30 in the heart of Jerusalem ; and again he saith : Go thou 
up on the height, rejoicer of Zion, and lift up thy voice 
and tell unto my people their sin , and so forth. No one can 
do aught by himself, nor by his power can he relate such 
a teaching, save haply he himself desire not this precious 

35 stone, which is the Lord of Life Himself, and by its efful- 


1-5 Joshua 21. 4, 6, f 28-32 Is. 40. 1,9. 
A 


3 ms. get'soney 6 on being drilled::^ and pale] in ms. af- 
ter 1. 15 virtue 15 thy] corrupt 


- 12* - 

gence, as though through the light from a mirror, is his own 
countenance illumined and by its knowledge, his mind, by 
truth and fervent faith. As John (Ipvane) says in his direct 
vision : This is the Lamb of God, Who shall remove the sins 
of the world . This is the true precious stone, which is the 5 
regal and royal crown of his bride the church : this gem is 
the emerald which was placed on the shoulders of the 
high-priest. 

p; 29 Upon this gem emerald were inscribed the gems (sic 1) of 
the twelve tribes of Israel. For of a verity through the high- 10 
priests did the precious gem Christ become known and the 
priests have taken it up and possess it and have spread abroad 
the knowledge of the Godhead among all. And on this pre- 
cious stone all the tribes are inscribed and they are justified 
by its holy illumination. They enter into the holy church 15 
and they spread and give to each the grace which is besto- 
wed by the observance of holy virginity. 

Some are watchful and joyful, and some are patient in 
courage: some have endurance and have understanding, 
and some have it by their sacred womanhood. All such as 20 
these the priesthood inscribes on this sacred gem, which is 
precious and which is the renewal of the birth from above 
of the bath : by its holy illumination it presents us with 
(or, sets before us) the good hope of sharing in the concept 
of Almighty God, and by the flesh and blood of Christ to 25 
become comrades and children of God and co-heirs of Christ 
who aids and makes to rejoice the kingdom of the Son of God. 


4. THE GEM JACINTH (IAKINT'EY). 

The fourth gem is the jacinth (iakinf ey) and this is the 
first in the second row, on which (pi.) is inscribed the name 39 
of Judah. Of a verity by the ordinance of its appearance is 
it clearly shown to us that to it is the fourth place and the 
p. 30 dominion. By omniscience is it assigned to its place in the 
quadrangular and oracular plate, and by grinding it down 


4-5 Apoc. 5. 9 9-10 Exod. 28. 9-12 29-30 Exod. 28. 18 

A 


was it set there after its order. For Judah was the ruler ovei' 
the people. 

When they divided the folk into four parts, Judah was the 
prince of the people and was encamped on the east side. In 

5 order of succession, however, he was the fourth among his bro- 
thers and invested with the kingdom and with the hegemony. 
The hue of this stone glows like a glowing coal, for from 
this tribe there shone forth He, Whom Isaiah reveals to us 
through the Holy Spirit, and thus he saith : I shall change 

10 thy stones into glowing coals, and I shall erect thy founda- 
tion of the sapphire gem , which shows us the two aspects 
of the kingdom, that the Lord, through His appearance in 
the llesh, revealed to us by likening Himself to the color 
of the two gems. 

15 For the gem sapphire is like to the color of the bloodstone 
(dzoceuli).It is clear that the base and the beginning and esta- 
blishment and the foundation of all is Christ, and again 
faith is indestructible and unchangeable. The gem jacinth 
is wholly of the color of blood and of the hue of glowing 

20 coals : of blood, because by this blobd of the only begotten 

Son of God were all the nations saved, and of the color of 

fire and of hot coals, because our Lord Jesus Christ shall 

judge the quick and the dead in glory at His coming. 

And there is again the name of the great and awful thought 

25 which is the color of fire and of glowing coals, which the 
seraph received from the fearful altar where the Lord 
was. The seraphim each with their six wings stood before P- 31. 
Him in great and awful ward and service. The seraph held ' 
with tongs a glowing coal, which is the thought from this 

30 awful altar, and he touched the mouth of the prophet. This 
taught to us all the great and terrible thought by taking it 
as a ransom for ourselves. 

This is the holiness of the lips of the prophet, for this 
great and terrible thought is the very flesh and blood of the 

35 Lord: it is divided among and is graciously granted to us 
all through faith and by deeds righteously performed, and to 


3-4 Num. 2.2 9-11 Is, 54. 25-28 Is. 6. 2 28-30 Is 6. 6-7. 

A 


the true believers as a ransom and a purification isitgraii* 
ted and bestowed. The befouled and deliled, however, who 
draw near with evil-doing, who are the unbelievers, take 
unto themselves this thought of the king, a token of wrath 
and condemnation upon themselves, for they became lust- 5 
ful and in their unworthiness received the flesh and blood 
of the Lord. As the apostle Paul saith : Wlioso hath eaten 
and drunk the flesh and blood of the Lord in unworthiness, 
eats and drinks to his own condemnation . 

The stpne jacinth teaches us all this namely, salvation 1C 
and wrath : salvation and purity of the worthy, wrath and 
torture of the unworthy and of the' scoffers. This is the 
precious stone, the jacinth, upon which is inscribed the 
name of Judah, from which tribe the Lord shone forth 
upon us, and the foundations of Zion were laid. The begin- IE 
ning and the base and the head of the corners is that stone 
which the builders rejected, who are the high-priests, who 
p. 32 are learned and instructed in the law. The Lord of the law 
they despised and put aside. They who were evil-doers were 
themselves rejected of the priesthood and set aside. 2( 

The Lord of Life, however, Who is the precious gem, 
became the head of the corners, Who is Himself both the 
beginning and the end. In both of these aspects He hath the 
confirmation, that is, of the old and the new, as John (Iva- 
ney) saith in his revelation that I am the beginning and 1 2i 
am the end , and because of His meekness of spirit He 
descended from heaven to the earth, and 'at the end, for He 
ascended aloft into the heavens and sat on the right hand 
of God in the heights. Verily is He the beginning and the 
confirmation, for none can build or destroy without His3( 
foundation, as the apostle Paul saith : No one can lay 
another foundation save He Himself who is Jesus Christ . 
He is the corner-stone, which hath two faces, who are the 
faithful of the circumcised and the uncircumcised : they 
have entered into one union of life, and have become all 3! 
of them the temple of God. This is the precious gem, the 
jacinth. 


6-8 1 Cor. 11. 27 15-17 Ps US. 22 25-26 Apoc. 1. 18 2&-30 1 Gor^ 3, 


- 131 - 

It is found in the river P'ison, for P'ison translated is'face 1 
of fire'. Verily hath our Lord Jesus Christ spread abroad the 
fire of warmth (or, heat) in the world, and hath consumed 
the sins of all which have been kindled and hath cleansed 
5 all his saints. Our Lord Jesus Christ wafted (lit. blew towards) 
the spirit upon his disciples and said : Receive ye the Holy 
Spirit : this also Nahum the prophet hath said : P'ison came 
down and spread itself abroad on thy face . FOE our Lord P- 33 
Jesus Christ arose from the dead. He fulfilled and incarna^- 

10 ted this, and this is the vision of the stone of marvel. It is 

luminous and gleaming like a coal of the color of blood, and 

it glows in its brilliancy like lighted lamps (or, torches), which 

brilliancy none can take away or hide from the lamps. 

Of a verity in this wise are illuminated and made glorious 

15 all the saints who have become worthy of receiving the Holy 
Spirit from Christ, and of all those illuminated ones who belie- 
ve in God through truth are all the souls now made glorious 
by Him, and in their meekness is clearly cast upon them the 
guise of an angel-like coming and by their thoughts also, 

20just as the countenance of Moses the meek became divinely 
fair, just as from the eye of the sun the dazzling rays gleam 
forth, wherefore because of the glory of the illumination 
none could gaze on the countenance of Moses. 

In such wise again the holy spirit. of Elijah rested on Eli- 

25 sha (Eliseys) and the sons of the prophets beheld him ; though 
he had told no one, all cried out and said : Lo ! the spirit 
of Elijah hath rested upon Elisha. 

But verily illumined with a still greater effulgence did 
the countenance of Stephen appear and more like to an 

30 angel irradiated by this vision did he seem when the spirit 
of grace rested upon him ; although the godless Jewish high- 
priests desired to stone him, he was not afraid but, filled with 
the spirit of grace 'and strengthened, he spake before all of P- 34 
the opening of the heavens and of the Son of God sitting on 

35 God's right hand and thus, by the confession of his martyr- 
dom and with great joy, he became a martyr crowned. 


5-7 Jo. 20. 22-23 7-8 Nahum 2. 2. 20-21 Exod. 34. 29 24-25 2 Kings 
2. 9 if, 26-27 2 Kings 2. 15 32 Acts 6. 15 37 Acts 7.55-56 

A 


- 132 - 

Such were all the saints ; although they humbled themsel- 
ves and lived straitened and oppressed in this world, there 
shone clearly forth from them the light of the graces of the 
Holy Spirit and they appeared glorifiepV before God and men. 

The gem jacinth is found in those places which are 5 
called Severitida (re/tygms), which is near to the Libyans, 
and Mavrosiay (Mavgcoaia), Bizakniay (Bifrxvia) and Nu- 
midiay (Nov/uidla) from the side of Ap'ridiay ('^gfe?). 
It is also worthy of great credence to identify (Jit. liken) the 
stone jacinth with that found in 'the lands of the Libyans near 10 
to the eastern district of Ethiopia, which extends towards 
the south. 

These are the black Ethiopians, some of whom are en- 
dowed with the graces of the Holy Spirit and by great under- 
standing of the supernal they have come near it in mind. 15 
For the light of the majesty of Christ has shone forth upon 
them and dispersed the mist of the power of darkness and 
the thought of the darkness (sic) has illuminated those who 
were clouded by human deeds of evil-doing (?). 

The thought purified them and caused them to shine and 20 
made them His friends and revealed to them all the concep- 
- tion of His godhead at His coming, and by His love of man- 
P- 35 kind He drove off the mist of the evil wiles of the enemy. 
He implanted within their thoughts ideas from Christ Him- 
self, which Paul preaches and says; We have the mind of 25 
Christ . Wonder not that the gem jacintn is found at night, 
for thus it is stated in the scriptures that in the darkness 
there shone forth a light . Verily there shone forth upon our 
darkened hearts the lignt of religion, and the darkness of 
those blackened evil deeds was dispersed from us. 

And by the hidden thought, like the appearance of the gem 
jacinth, He reveals Himself to His saints, for there had 
not yet been declared in the law which existed nor spread 
abroad to the prophets in the law, the blessings of the Gos- 
pel. Many of the just sought Christ the Saviour and .He 35 
revealed Himself to them by the secret thought, and by 


13-15 Ci 1 . Acts 8. 26 f 16-19 cf 2 Pet, 2. if 25*26 1 Cor. 2. 16 26-27 Mt. 4. 16 

A 


. 133 

their knowledge of themselves they prophesied to others 
also, for there were prophecies revealed of this stone and 
precious gem Christ. 

As David says, his foundations are on the mountains 
5 of the saints ,that is to say,His word was unto all the pro- 
phets. And they bore witness to and preached the confir- 
mation of the foundation, to which the King of Heaven came 
and confirmed it, and His people received the royal honor 
by conferment. He invested many with the great honor of 

10 the priesthood and placed a crown upon His church and made 
her a queen and placed her at His right, hand, and traced 
in the midst of our forehead the precious sign and adorned 
her. For verily by the sign of the cross of Christ and by His P 36 
death He bestowed upon us life and the forgiveness of sins 

15 and made us worthy of glory and the inheritance of His 
kingdom. 

5. THE GEM SAPPHIRE (SAP'IRONI). 

The fifth stone is the sapphire (sap'ironi); on it is inscribed 
the name of Dan, who was in accordance with the order of 
his birth written down in the table of the law near to Judah, 

2 Of or from the tribe of Dan many became judges of Israel 
and later became kings clothed in royal purple. From this 
tribe was Oholiab (Eliab), who superintended (or, contrived) 
the arrangement (or, service) of the tabernacle of the covenant^ 
for he made its porphyry (Zi/.purple) and ordered all the ser- 

25 vice for the ark of the covenant and a share of the heritage 

fell to the lot of tha triba of Dan at the sources of the Jordan- 

The Lord of Heaven purified the sources of the Jordan 

and made them the adornment and the raiment of the 

church, dyed witji His blood and cleansed with His Godhead. 

30 He made them into a purple vestment and a regal adorn- 
ment ; all the people in the holy catholic church became 
draped in Christ (i.e. XQiaroyogot) and became royal through 
the divine honor which was bequeathed to them and with 


4-5 Ps. 87. 1. 18 Exod. 28. 18. 20-21 Judges 13. 2 if, 21-23 Exod, 38. 23 
26 Judges 18. 1 ff, 

A 


134 

conscious knowledge they confessed the true faith. All this 
the sapphire stone taught us ; by the names of the tribes it 
mentally shows us its power and the royal service which pro- 
vided and appointed a servitor for the ark of the covenant. 

p. 37 For from this tribe arose the judges, who had the powers 5 
and the consideration (fort, marshallings) of kings over this 
folk : in the dust ground off the sapphire gem, its color is 
changed into another : this mentally teaches us that of this 
tribe some were to be good and some bad. As certain ones 
relate to us they take their testimony from books * that 10 
from this tribe shall arise the Antichrist (anteyk'ristey), 
who is the opponent of Christ, for thus it is said : Dan as 
a snake coiled in the roads to strike at the hoof s of the horses 
and to cast backwards his rider ; and they say that he who 
uttered this was a prophet and after he had seen this fearful 15 
figure, he spake this as a parable, and he saith thus ; 
In the salvation of the Lord he teaches us His name. Had 
not God aided them at this time, he would have let none 
escape from his hands . 

And again Moses says concerning him in his blessings : 20 
Let him begin to leap, like a lion from Bashan (Basaa- 
nit') , and again this is understandable by all how, just 
as does John in the enumeration of the thousands of the 
twelve tribes of Israel, of those holy virgins who sit near 
the bride in the kingdom of the heavens,he does not count 25 
them to be of the tribe of Dan. It was not that there were no 
virgins or saints in this tribe there were many. I think,how- 
ever, that it figuratively shows us the image of these per- 
sons, for from this tribe is to appear the enemy. He deprived 
Dan of his heritage and in place of him he has added Ma- 30 

p. 38 nasseh to the number. Let not thy reverend self be amazed 
in aught that the same parables are used in the Scriptures 
of good persons or of bad ones, for we behold the very same 
parables and figures employed in the books with varying 
sense. ' . ,35 


5-7 Judges 13. 1 ff 12-14 Gen. 49. 17 21 Deut. 33. 22 23 Apoc 7. 5-8. 

A . . 

23 f, ms. almost illegible through weathering of the ink 


135 

Christ is called a lion, not because of the image which is 
in our mind of a lion with his blood-thirstiness and his beast 
like savageness, but He is called this because of His king- 
dom and because He divides joy among all and because He 
5 gathers together many in his cool shade. The devil, too, 
is called a lion, not because of the kingdom or of the exten- 
sion of joy to all, but because of his ferocity and evil tyranny. 
Christ again is called the lion's whelp, for when the lioness 
bears a cub, it lies three days as dead and on the third day 

10 rises, just as Christ was shut three days in the heart of the 

earth and destroyed the gates of hell and rose on the third 

day. The devil is called a lion and a lion's cub also, because 

of his savagery and ferocity and his bestial appearance. 

'Again, Christ is called a sheep ; they call his disciples sheep, 

15 because of their serenity and their placidity and their vir- 
tuous deeds, who became bearers of increase (lit. fruit) 
like unto sheep. They also call the sinners sheep. It is said 
in the book: The flocks shall be given over to hell, and 
death shall shepherd them . The Holy Spirit descended 

20 like unto a dove at the sources of the Jordan, because of 
the stainlessness and gentleness and innocence of the dove. p. 39 
Ephraim is also called a witless dove,for it is an animal and 
unrestrained, and he dwelt with (or, married) those who 
harmed him. Thus we find this very same parable with 

25 regard to all, here of the bad and there of the good. With 
the one the nature is taken for comparison, with another 
the appearance. 

Thus we see in the case of Dan likewise the gem sapphire 
expresses in some cases the good in that tribe and in some 

SOcases the bad. Gold, too, which is a matter of marvel for all, 
which comes forth from the ground, has its whole worth shown . 
on the mountain at the hands of the tester (or, tempter) ; he 
desired to tempt and to deceive the Lord of all creation and 
said : All the kingdom and the glory of the earth is given 

35 unto me, arid I will give it unto thee , and so forth. The 


1 Gen. 49. 4 51 Pet. 5. 8. 8 Gen. 49. 9 11 Mt. 16.18 12 1 Pet. 5. 8 
14 Is. 53. 7 ; Jo. 22. 16-17 14 Is. 53. 6 18-19 PS. 49. 14 19-20 Mt 3. 6 
22 Hos. 7, 11 34-35 Mt. 4, 3 ; Lc. 4, 5 . 

A 


136 

i 

sapphire, however, is intransmutable and is the outward 
guise of good salvation ; many judges arose from this tribe of 
Dan and set Israel free, just as the dust of this gem when 
mixed with milk cures swellings and tumors. Those who ex- 
tract teaching and knowledge concerning the world from the 5 
prophets and mix them as with milk with the blessings of 
Paul's preaching and with the deeds of marvel of the Gospel, 
their minds are pure and healed and have become blessed. 
With a pure heart have they beheld God and they have 
p. 40 become seers of God. The Israelites beheld God onthemoun-10 
tain and beneath his feet the sapphire. 

For the holy church is the foundation of Sion, as a queen 
adorned with ornaments. It is written thus : I .have laid 
thy stones as of hyacinth and thy foundations as of sapphire 
have I erected . Here again the one follows the other, 15 
the jacinth and the sapphire, for Judah shows us the king- 
dom and Dan the judgeship. 


6. THE GEM JASPER (IASPINI). 

The sixth gem is the jasper (iaspini), on which is inscri- 
bed the name of Naphtali (Nep't'alem), who was next by 20 
birth. The name Naphtali being interpreted is 'broadness'. 
Many are the kinds of this gem, nor is it found in one place, 
but in many quarters, as we have shown thee above when 
we spoke concerning the stones. For Naphtali it is who shall 
inherit the breadth of the land and shall yield unto all Israel 25 
fulness. 

For he was a toiler, and he raised the fruit of this ful- 
ness for the nourishment of all, And Moses says concerning 
him : The sea 'and the dry land shalt thou inherit : and 
Isaiah the prophet again : The land of Zebulon and the 30 
land of Naphtali beyond the sea. The people who dwelt 
in darkness hath seen a great light ; those who sat in the 
darkness and the shadows of death upon them hath a 
light shone , and so forth. 


1-3 Judges 11. 2 ff 10-11 Exod. 24. 10 13-15Is.54.il 19Exod. 28. 19 
14Deut. 33. 13 30-34 Is. 9. 1; Mt, 4- 15-16 


137 

/ 

For in the place of both these tribes the Lord blessed the 
bread and fed with five loaves five thousand, and with what 
fragments remained they filled twelve baskets ; and again p. 41 
with seven loaves he set forth a meal for four thousand and 
5 they filled seven baskets with the remainder. Of a verity 
between the tribes of Zebulon and Naphtali said the Lord in 
His blessings as He sat on the mountain : Their leadership 
was lengthened by their blessing . He walked on the 
waters of the sea, and after coming to Capernaum, He 

10 healed Peter's wife's mother and on the sea of Gennesareth 
He performed divine miracles: from these places and vil- 
lages He caused to appear the lights of the world, who are 
the holy apostles, that their radiance might be made to 
shine to all the four quarters of the heavens. 

15 The gem jasper, whereon is inscribed the name of Naphtali, 
is in appearance like to the hue of the emerald, and secondly 
its color resembles that of the sea, since the sea emits a 
green color in its brilliancy, and resembles verdegris in its 
greenness ; for it was near the sea of Tiberias that his heri- 

20tage was allotted to Naphtali and it is near to Zebulon and 
extends as far as the great sea. 

The stone jasper is of various kinds and each type varies in 
its hue, as we have told in detail above ; some are found near 
the warm water and some at Ama<th> us. So was it also 

25 with the miracles of God; the apostles were chosen from 
many places : some from the parts of Naphtali, from Chora- 
zin and Bethsaida and Capernaum and Magdala ; they P- 42 
became the miraculous deeds of the divine marvels. They 
gathered together from all places and followed God : they 

SObecame worthy of blessing and healing and glorified the 
God of Israel. 

After a long time some of them turned to ungodliness ; 
Simon the magician (grdzneuli) received baptism from Peter 
and became a preacher of falsehood and not of truth. Niko- 


1-3 Mt. 14,7-21 3-5 Mt. 15. 33-38 7-8Deut. 5. 33 9-10 Mk. 1. 30 

Mt. 8. 14 19-21 Joshua 19. 32 33 Acts 8. 9 ff. 34 Apoc. 2. 6, 15 

A 

24 warm water] i, e. in archetype deQfiov vdpros for 
d6vro: Amathus] ms. amasya. 


138 

laos, one of the seven deacons who was with Stephen, became 
an evil heretic and led many astray, and again Kerinthos 
(Kerint'ey) and many others who had communed with Peter 
later turned aside and became leaders (or, teachers) of evil 
and not of good. 5- 

As I have said before about this stone, it is a revelation, 
as it were, which comes in a dream. It is found in the regions 
of Phrygia, as it were, in a nest like a trough of clay, and 
there is a likeness and an interpretation to its form : for in 
the course of their teaching certain ones confess the supre-10 
macy of the Lord by royal prerogatives (?),and they fall 
into various erroneous doctrines, as they mistake the extent 
and depth and height of this doctrine, some through wit- 
lessness and some through evil-doing and some through 
pride. Their minds are ravished by lack of knowledge and in 15 
some places they make conflicting statements and involve 
themselves still more deeply. To them were . the heathen 
likewise akin (lit. close) through their ignorance, who don- 
P- 43 ned the guise of ravening wolves in their bloodthirstiness 
and were like unto evil beasts in their ways. Just as this 20 
gem has the appearance of the color of blood, mixed as it 
were with milk, so, too, are the evil heathen rejoiced at the 
charity 01 God, though they are not aware oi the true God, 
but ever live and die in their own evil. 

The holy preachers, however, the true apostles, who were 25 
deemed worthy of receiving the powers of Christ, as though 
with milk, feed the whole world with the divine apostolic 
writings. By the blood of Christ they removed the sins 
of the faithful, and by the gospel of the word of the Lord 
they drove out deeds of savageness from the thoughts of 30 
many. These were the apostles chosen from the tribes of 
Mapthali and of Zebulon, who were filled with the spirit 
of power and received from the word of Christ the God the 
mighty gift and spread it abroad unrecompensed to all the 
quarters of Heaven. They drove out devils and severed 


35 Mk. 16. 17 

A 
29 the word] ms. he says from this. 


139 


knots of sins ; they cast aside unbelief and taught the hea- 
then the true faith ; each and all being filled with good works 
glorified the one and only God. 


7. THE GEM LIGURE (LYGYRIONI). 

5 The seventh stone is the ligure in its order and position 
in the oracular plate. This is the first gem in the third row, 
arranged and set after the order of his birth, and there is 
inscribed on this gem the name of Gadl-His share of the her- p. 44 
itage was allotted to Gad near to Reuben, beyond the river 

10 Jordan and, between Gad and Reuben, half the tribe of Manas- 
seh. The share of Gad extends to the north, and stretches up to 
the boundaries of Dan and of the heritage of Reuben from the 
rayine of Aron to the city of Aruir, and his heritage extends 
as far as Syria (Asuramde) and Medeba (Madabenad) and 

15Brea (Bread) and the boundary of the mountain of Nabo 
(Nabovisa) and extends to Heshbon (Enebondmde) and Ela- 
leh (Eleliad) and to Jazir (lazirdmde), and between the ones 
and the others is the abode of the half-tribe of Manasseh, and 
extends as far as Bethron, the Jordan, and further to the crest 

20 of the mountain to Bashan, and from thence to Gaza, and 
this is the boundary between Reuben and Gad. 

The ligure stone, as we have said before, is rare( or, choice) 
and hard to find. A story has come down to us from the 
ancients, which we have told before at length. My opinion is 

25 that this is the hyacinth,, which is mentioned in the divine 
scriptures. The hue of the ligure is a yellowish red (lit . honey- 
color bloodstone-color.) 

The name of the gem is one, but its colors are manifold 
as are the hyacinth's, and there is inscribed on it the wondrous 

30 name of Gad, who is near to the half -tribe of Manasseh; 
I think that we should naturally understand the Tishb itc 
(T'esbaeli), which is in Galaad, whose abode is between the 
half-tribe of Manasseh and that of Gad. 


5 Exod. 28. 19 8 f. Joshua 13.24 ff. : Joshua 13. 15 : Joshua 13. 9 : Num 
32. 3 : Num. 32. 36 


140 

p. 45 From hence came Elijah the prophet, the son of Ak'imay, 
who was of the race of Aaron (Ahron), and abode in these 
places and heritages because of the priesthood of- his tribe, 
which was scattered among all the tribes of Israel ; as Jacob 
says : I shallscatter you among Jacob and divide you among 5 
Israel; because of the? priesthood and of their being Le- 
vites, they dwelt here and there in all the places. The tribe of 
Symeon, however, because of its learning in the scriptures 
and of the wisdom of its understanding and the instruction 
which it gave to all, dwelt along with the other tribes. 10 

Now be thou not amazed in any wise that we have men- 
tioned Elijah the prophet together with Gad, and that we 
have identified with him the form of this gem. For he was 
by nature of the seed of Galaad, near to the tribe of Joseph 
and to the half -tribe of Manasseh, for in many places we find 15 
priests and high-priests who have come each from. their own 
tribes. We find the high-priest Abiathar in the city of Nom- 
ba, which belonged to the priests of the tribe of Judah as their 
dwelling place, and Samuel, who was an Ephrathite, dwelt 
in the tribe of Ephraim. Eli dwelt at Selom, which was the 20 
habitation of Benjamin, and thus dispersed and scattered 
in every tribe did the priestly tribes abide. .,/ 

I think that the gem ligure is the hyacinth, whose po- 
tency I wish to expound, but it does not appear, as we 
have said before, where the gem ligure is found. Next 125 
shall begin to investigate regarding the same. I have stated 
p. 46 through love of truth that, if it is brought near a fire, the 
latter's potency is quenched, just as Elijah rose aloft in the 
chariot of fire and took no harm. He called down the fire 
from above and it came down on the bands of fifty and the 30 
captains of fifty, and again like a flash through the sacri- 
fices on the priests of Baal. And he himself in the midst of 
the strong blaze was unharmed, and bore it without injury. 

Thus I consider were the three mortal youths who were 
in Babylon, nor was aught of harm done them by the fire. 35 


1 1 Kings 17. 1 4 cf. Joshua 21. 1 ff. 5-6 Gen. 49. 7 8-10 cf. Gen. 49. 6 
.14-15 cf. Joshua 19. 1 ff. 14-15 Joshua 13. 31 17-18 1 Sam. 21. 1 ff and Mk. 

2. 26 19-20 1 Sam. 7. 17 20-21 1 Sam. 1 3. 28-29 2 Kings 2. 11 

29-31 2 Kings 1. 10 ff. 31-32 1 Kings 18. 20 11 34-35 cf. Dan, 3. 12 ff. 


j 

Of a verity is the potency of this stone a marvel, for all 
the saints were brought to sacrifice upon it. Those three 
youths were encompassed about with fire and took no harm ; 
on the contrary they brought the king to believe and impel- 
5 led all the unbelievers toward a knowledge of God. By them 
were the idolatries brought into disrepute and they destroy- 
ed the idols which had led people astray, as they did in other 
places with one folk after another. They converted men from 
unbelief to the true faith, as does the hyacinth gem, which 

10 is in the depth of the abysses, and none hath the power to 
take it out save by the blood of the lamb and the rushing 
pinions of the eagle. 

Such also is the holy daring of Elijah, say I, and of the three 
youths, who were in Babylon, and of the most blessed Thekla, 

15 who was brave in the time of her trial :not that it was their 
power which brought about salvation, but tn'e, coming of 
the Lamb, Who removed the sins of the world, and like to p. 47 
the eagle in the power of His Godhead, His ascension into 
heaven and His going up. 

20 For in this is shown to us the concept of this precious stone : 
I refer to Serdak', Misag and Abednagoy under the rule of 
death. Moses says that until the coming of Christ we find 
all souls beneath the rule of death 'in their being', as Paul 
the Apostle says. 

25 For as long as Moses was read, he fastened the cover- 
ing on the old law, and when the grace of the new law, 
Christ, came, by the removal of the covering from then on 
He proclaimed to them immortality. If this law was mortal 
in its glory, how much more glorious will the Law of Life ; 

ho be ? All this, however, we have said that it is stated that 

until the coming of Christ there was the rule of death, although 

it is said that there were many from Adam to the coming 

of Christ. 

About this there is another opinion and interpretation, 

35 but that it was the law he judged Heaven forfend ! Nor 
was the scripture minished in aught, but it was a sentence 


16-17 Apoc. 5. 6 if. 21-22 Dan, 3, 12. ff. 24 Rom. 5. 6. /25-3S cf. 2, Cor. 
12 T 15 21 cf.Rom. 6. 14 If. ' 


6f death for those who were indulging in trangression and 
sin ; the law was not a judgment Heaven forfend ! but those 
who had not held by justice and because of their hastiness 
received sentence of death upon themselves through unwit- 
ingncss of their evil deeds. The glory was not because of the 5 
law, for it was laid down by God, but because the face of 
p. 48 Moses the splendid had been made glorious and the face 
of his ensplendored flesh was the estoppal of death, its bu- 
rial and destruction. 

This is the salvation (or, solution) of glories, wouldst thou 10 
say, that the .flesh of our Saviour was buried, yet His flesh 
beheld not corruption, neither was His soul encompassed 
in hell, for on the third day He rose. Thus is it said : On 
the third day I shall rise in my glory ; as the prophet saith : 
Awake, my glory, with song and harp ; just as the dis- 15 
ciples say in the New Testament : ' Awake, Lord, for we be 
perishing in this turmoil of the sea', and the Lord awoke from 
slumber . From the sleep of His flesh, say I, and rebuking 
with His glory He calmed and brought to silence both the sea 
and its turbulence by fear and by the word of the Lord . And 20 
the prophets prophesied concerning His passion and the resur- 
rection from the dead, and thus His awakening is mentioned : 
And I shall awake at the dawn and I shall awake with my 
glory , and this awakening is of the natural flesh, and that 
which He speaks of 'with my glory' is the nature, of God. 25 

Now let us, because of the difficulty of this passage, apper- 
ceive (fort, lengthen) it, and take that in which it is said'until 
Moses' -not so, but 'until the coming of Christ' do the scrip- 
tures say the power of death is to be. Again it is written in 
the law of the Lord that there came forth evil deeds in Bab- 30 
ylon from those old men who judged the people. 

But after reading the five books (lit. heads) of the Pen- 
tateuch (lit. Genesis) and Joshua the son of Nun and Jud- 
p. 49 g s and Ruth, and the book<s> of Kings 'and the Chronicles 
and those that are written in periods (i.e, cola), that is, in 35 
verse, and the books of the prophets, nowhere did I find 


6-7 Exod. 34. 29 f. 13-14Hos. 6. 2. 15 Ps. 108. 2 16-18 Lc, 8. 24 

23-24 Ps 57. 8 27-29 Rom. 5. 14 29-31 Sus. 5 


the saying of these words in the Law of the Lord which 
Daniel testifies to and says. I found on seeking in the books 
of Jeremiah, wherein it is said as follows : Seventy years , 
he answered, were this people to abide in captivity . And 
She says to the sons of Israel in the land of the Babylonians : 
Take to yourselves wives and beget sons and plant vine- 
yards and eat of the fruit thereof . 

And after this he says : Let them receive this parab le 
in the land of the Babylonians , and they say : 'What, then, 

10 hath the Lord done to thee? and they have put thee to the 
trial like Ak'ia and Sedekia,whom the king of the Babylonians 
burnt on the grid because of their unrighteousness and whore- 
mongery, who committed adulteries with the wives of their 
fellow-townsmen and spake words of falsehood in this 

15 name, which I commanded them not to do, and I am a witness 
to all this', saith the Lord Almighty . 



REGARDING THE UNLAWFUL ACTION OF THE 
UNJUST ELDERS OF SUSANNAH. 

/ 

Verily he saith this against the elders : for Sedekia was 
20 one of the leaders and Ak'ia another ; though Daniel does 
not mention their names, he makes them manifest to us in 
other books, in which are the Revelations of Daniel, for there 
the names are mentioned in writing of the one, Aba, and of 
the other, Ada. 

25 Jeremiah, however, relates the torturing of the unjust 
judges and elders otherwise, that Nebuchadnezzar, the king p, 50 
of the Babylonians, burned them on a plate (or, grate). 
Daniel, however, says thus, that the whole people rose against 
Susannah to stone her with stones ; again we find in another 
30 Revelation of Daniel that a pillar of fire fell down from 
heaven between the two elders, nor did it consume them 
instantly, but kept them in torture for .a long time. Now 


3-4 Jer. 29. 10 5-6 Jer. 29. 5-6 8 Jer. 29. 4 ? , 9-12 Jer. 29. 21-22 
13-16 Jer. 29. 23 19-20 Jer. 29, 21. 23-24 Gf. Walton Bibl . Pol. Sus. 

5-6 : text.syr. II. 25-27 Jer. 29. 22 28-29 Sus. o' 62 30-32 Sus. 61 

A Ar (2 f f) 

17-18 Regarding etc.] in red capitals in the margin 


"- 144 - 

I shall show to thee what tortures came upon these evil 
elders <and> judges, for the statements of Jeremiah and 
Daniel are not in conflict with one another. 

All this torture came upon those ungodly elders who 
transgressed the law, for the law ordained not to take bribes 5 
nor to turn justice aside, even though it were to have com- 
passion on the unfortunate in the trial, nor to truckle to the 
rich, but to pursue an even-handed justice. They, however, 
bought justice with a bribe, and an account of its ordination 
(o/y decency) was implanted in their thoughts, which begot 10 
this evil and roused their lust for the holy Susannah, and 
the divine vengeance revealed itself unto the youth Daniel. 
With a just judgment it smote these lawless judges before 
all and, through this judgment, Daniel, like unto the . law, 
commanded the lawless judges to be pelted with stones. 15 
And the people went forth to stone the lawless elders. Through 
God there was made manifest to all by Daniel the just trial 
in this upright judgment. It came down from heaven as 
p. 51 a token of the justice of truth that all might tremble. Let 
none be desirous to turn aside justice by a bribe or to play 20 
the perjurer in court ; and thus great was the fear because, 
of this act of justice. 

When the people began to stone the evil elders, nor had 
their souls as yet departed from their evil flesh a sight of 
horror! there fell down between them a pillar (Zif.stick) 25 
of fire, and consumed the evil elders. And ere the souls of the 
evil elders had gone forth from them in bitter torment, all 
were in a tremble and hither and thither they spread the report 
in Babylon. 

Nebuchadnezzar the King heard of the terror of this judg- 30 

ment, and was amazed and awe-stricken at the justice/ 

(One page of the manuscript torn out) 

/ and if ye did not yield, and 

God should judge you because of the tumult of the people ; 
and thus they deceived the women. 35 


5-6 Exod. 23. 1-3 12 Sus. 50. 23 Sus. 61 25-26 Sus. O 1 61 

A Ar 


MMMM 


145 


The women gave themselves up to the impurity of harlo a 
try with the elders. This story Daniel attests, for he says : 
Thus did they to the daughters of Israel, and these in trem- 
bling and in fear gave themselves unto you in impurity, nor 
5 did this daughter of Judah partake of your unlawfulness . 
Unto this likewise testifies the prophecy of Jeremiah and 
saith : There were blows inflicted upon the leaders because 
of their lawlessness,and they committed whoredom with the 
wives of their fellow-citizens and they prophesied the word p.52 

10 of falsehood to them in the name of the Lord; and I the 
Lord gave no command to them and they cite my words for 
their own testimony >.. 

For this is the tale concerning them, that by the name of 
the Lord they led the women astray, and claimed that 

15 'from your race is the Christ to come forth'. This they said 
in the words of the Lord, and the Lord spake not unto 
them. Wherefore the Lord sent upon these lawless elders 
the scourge of fire in a pillar, and the consuming on a plate 
(or,, grid) through the anger of Nebuchadnezzar and the con- 

20futation by the prophet Daniel. I, however, undertook the 
relation of all this, because of the deceitful appearance of this 
precious stone and because of the word,, of the apostle, in 
which he saith : Death ruled from Adam until Moses over 
them also who sinned not: Regarding this Daniel says : 

25 As it is written in the Law of the Lord that from these elders 

there went forth unlawful acts . Dost thou not see that 

Daniel also speaks of the law of Jeremiah? And the Lord 

in the Gospel saith : the Law and the Prophets until John . 

Dost thou see that until Christ was the dominion of death? 

30 And all the souls of the saints and of those who did not s in 
remained (lit. stood) confined under the servitude and do- 
minion of death until the Lamb of God was slain, Who remo- 
ved the sins of the world : with His soul there descended 
into hell the Word of God, until the flesh (pi.) of the Lord 

35 on the Cross, like that of the lamb, was consumed. And 
they cast Him down into the riven cleft and placed Him in the 
hollowed rock on a bier. Although the soul and the flesh were p. 53 


3-6 Sus. 3*7 7-11 Jer. 29. 33 18 cf. Sus. O' 62 18-19 cf. Jer 29. 2 

23-24 Rom. 5. 14 25-26 Dan. 9. 1. 28' Mt. 11. 13 35-37 cf. Mt. 27. 57-60 
A Ar (1-28) 


146 

divorced from one another, yet the Word of God was not 
parted from the soul and the flesh. 

Inasmuch as there the flesh of the lamb, joined to the 
precious stone, was borne aloft by the downward-swooping 
eagles, so was it also in the slaying and the suffering of 5 
Christ that this came about in the going down of the flesh 
of the Lord on to the bier and in the descent of the souls into 
hell. The precious stones, the just, 'were raised and came 
forth and came from thence in the renowned Lamb Who 
descended unto them. Of a verity by the great likeness of 10 
the discovery of this precious stone, its interpretation showed 
us its acquisition and its profit, for the Lord led forth from 
hell the souls of ,the just through His descent into hell. He 
destroyed the gates of death, and liberated all from its 
fangs and drew them around Him, and the Lord led His 15 
servants, the meek and the humble, forth. 

And this He Himself testifieth to and saith : When I 
shall be raised, I shall take unto me . Not only on the cross 
did He fulfill this, but in the holy resurrection as well, which 
was on the third day. Other documents, too, testify to this 20 
that His soul did not remain in hell. 

The soul itself together with the Godhead on its descent 
into hell broke the bars and severed the bonds of Hades, and 
saved all His saints by His power. And when the valiant 
shepherd arose from the dead, He breathed upon his disciples 25 
p. 54 and said : Receive ye the Holy Spirit . Then the Lord 
ascended into heaven with all the flesh in fulness, as He was 
incarnated both in body and soul and accomplished all things. 
Of a verity He arose and made His flesh unsullied and im- 
mortal and His soul together with the body in unity with the 30 
divine nature ; in great glory He mounted into heaven. 
He sat on the right hand of the Father and mounted aloft 
into the heavens and by His only-begotten flesh the latter 
announced to all the saints the hope of the resurrection 
and the kingdom. Verily is the parable marvellous and the 35 


14 cf. Is. 38. 10 17 -18 Jo. 12. 32 26 Jo. 20, 22 

A 


*- 147 -- 

interpretation of the precious stone ; since also the ligure is 
the jacinth, all of this potency He revealed to us. 

But inasmuch as the gem is called lygyrion, that is, the tail 
of the cow, which is of this color. This animal is called lygy- 
5 rion, for there are in the land of the Egyptions wild cattle, 
whom they call babalon (Potpafas), and the tuft of the tail 
of the babalon emits a greenish-colored light,like to this gem ; 
because of the resemblance in color the name is applied to 
this stone. If any one should drink this stone and if any 

10 one should give its exudations to women to drink, it causes 
conception and easy birth. 

Rightly is there written on it the name of Gad, for in place 
of herself Leah (Lia) gave Zilphah (ms. Lehp'a), and Leah 
raised up the sons who came forth from her by Jacob as her 

15 own. Zilphah (ms. Lehp'a) became honored in place of Ja- 
cob, and they all became precious stones. They became wor- 
thy of being called a holy tribe and, like this precious gem 
the ligure, they are given to drink for easy birth. So, too, p. 55 
the prophets and the apostles and all the righteous became 

20 precious blood and received grace from God; then they 
bestowed on men all good things. 

Just as Elijah gave to the widow him whom he raised from 
the dead, and Elisha by his prayers granted birth to the 
Shunamite, and the waters of Jericho, which had been child- 

25 Ifess, through the prayer of Elisha became blessed and f ruit- 
fiil.So also did the holy companies of the apostles,the churches 
and the heathen peoples, whose birth was difficult ; the dis- 
ciples received power from God, went forth and preached the 
Gospel in all places ; being imbued with grace by the prea- 

30 ching of the Gospel, they brought them to birth through 
faith and to relationship with Him who was born, of God and 
proclaimed through their teaching the Gospel to all. 

Let them announce . (or, rejoice) to the church, which did 
not give birth : Beware, take heed and cry out to him who 

35 harmed thee not, for many are those who are born into the 


12-14 Gen. 30. 9*13 22-23 Gf. 1 Kings 17. 27 ff 23-24 cf. 2 Kings 4, 18 U. 
24-26 cf. 2 Kings 2. 19-22 

A 

13, 15 Zilphah] ms. Lehp'a 


148 

desert of this creation ere it be fruitful . Many are the 
miracles performed by the apostles upon all the heathen, 
and they destroyed them who openly (lit. before eyes) prac- 
tised deceit. They drove forth devils from them and from their 
villages, and brake all the idols and scattered them and 5 
freed them from idolatry. 

Receive ye these sayings in loving-kindness and the profit 
which we shall obtain from the potency 'of the gem lygyrion, 
p.56 and let no one say : Thou saidest not where we find the 
gem ligure, nor whence it comes, nor where one could find 10 
aught like to all thou saidest . Many a type of this stone 
is mentioned and no one knows these stones, but, from com- 
prehending the accounts in ancient books,their color is known 
and the profit from them is realized. 

There are many gems at first called by one name and later 15 
it was changed to another, but now the gem ligure had its 
name also from the ancients : later on it was givfen -another 
.name, wherefore I opine that the hyacinth is meant in the 
scriptures. This is all our knowledge about this precious 
stone, and what we have mentioned are the powers of its 20 
interpretation. 


8. THE GEM AGATE (AKATI). 

The eighth, gem is the agate, which is the second in number 
in the third row on the plate, and rightly there is written 
on it the name of Asher (Aser) . 

He, too, is in the order of birth of the sons of Israel and 
the name of Asher in translation is 'richness'. In the blessing 
of his sons in order Jacob says : Asher (Aseyr), thou wert in 
fullness and fatness of wheat and from thee shall be nou- 
rished all the mighty ones of Israel . For the places of his 3o 
abiding are fruitful and fulness, for he abode in his fulness 
and gave a spring of fruitfulness and multiplication, and 
p. 57 was able to nourish the kings and princes of the land, as we 


23-24 Exod. 28. 19 28-30 Gen. 49. 20 

A 


149 

have said before, each in his way, of the twelve tribes of 
the sons of Israel. 

The tribe of Asher was acquainted with work and labor 
on the land and afforded sufficiency to all. The color of 
5 this stone, the same, that is, the agate,is the hue of a lion 
(i.e., tawny). The gem is not scarlet nor is it green, but of the 
color of the earth of a reddish,full (Zi*.fat),and not a sandy, 
color. This earth is veiny and solid and produces many fruits 
and is not filled with -tares. It is cultivated in many places 

10 and fills kings and their peoples with fertility. 

Verily is the inscription rightly graven around this stone, 
which it hath received and hath the name of Asher. The 
appearance of this stone is of a <tawny> hue, for it is called 
the Lord's (adj.), and thou shouldst know that sometimes 

15 this stone resembles a coiled snake and sometimes it is said 
that it leaps with a bound (or, starts to spring) like a lion. 
Thus Moses saith concerning him, that Dan (sic) shall crouch 
to spring, like a lion from Bashaw . Of a verity is the hue of 
the stone marvellous, which resembleth the color of a lion. 

20 For after the fashion of its strength is it called a lion,both in 
the force of his overweening disposition and the irascibility 
of his heart against all. Such also is the whole power of the 
riches of Asher, from whom were foods and victuals, riches 
and powers of kings and of all the chief high-priests and 

25 priests and the food and the riches of the temple of the 
Lord : by the labor and the fruitfulness of Asher all were fed. p-58 

The color of the stone is similar to that of a lion ;it teaches 
(lit. taught) the change in the law which came to light at the 
preaching of the Gospel through the grace of the hands of 

30 the apostles, because of which in the psalter (pi.) David 
calls the apostles the sons of God, for he said thus ; Sacrifice 
to the Lord, ye sons of God , and again he says : Offer to 
the Lord the children of rams, tribes and peoples , and again 
he says : They lived and gave him of the gold of Araby , 

35 which shows the resurrection of the Lord, when He under- 
went His sufferings and arose : to Him was given the tried 


17-18 Deut, 34, 32 31-32 Ps, 28. 1 32-33 Ps. 28. 1 34 PS, 72, 15 

A 


150 . 

gold Which (pi.) He refined and purified and made the adorn- 
ment of His kingdom. 

'The first enlightener (i. q., baptizer) hailed from Arabia 
and came through obedience into the kingdom of God, of whom 
it is said : The kings of Araby shall offer him gifts . In one 5 
case this was done by the Magi who came and offered him 
gifts : they adored the Lord : and in another this was accom- 
plished by the eunuch of Queen Kandakey, and still more was / 
this so through Paul the apostle, who went forth to Damascus 
' and came first from Arabia ; and after he had preached there 1.0 
for just three years, he spread light by the word of the Gos- 
pel. After three years he came to Jerusalem so that the apostle, 
who had come along with the bridegroom, might offer as 
a gift the faith of Arabia and Sheba. 

p. 59 For in accordance with the law he was called a bridegroom 15 
whose name was inscribed on this gem, which was the 
priest's ornament : for this is Asher, the riches of the king, 
a lovely sight, the gem agate : let us speak forth concerning 
this from the new law as well. For it is written there also in 
the praises of Asher and saith : There shall pass over to 20 
thee the riches of the heathen . Of a verity did the heathen 
pass over to such a holy hope of God and they received the 
strength of lions and the riches of Asher, they who had once 
been the opponents and had become strong through their 
revolt. By their disobedience they fell away from the fear 25 
of God and became desirous in their unwittingness of 
being beneath the rule of the devil, but since they were 
converted they have submitted themselves to the commands 
of God. And they entered the house of the Lord, which is 
that of revolt and by the might of heathendom they exhibited 30 
the power which they had from their unwittingness. They 
went forth and multiplied through wisdom the power of the 
faith and by the grace of the King of heaven and by the nature 
of the maiden of worthiness, for by the po'wer of the Holy 
Spirit she became strong and glorious. 35 


5 Ps. 72. 10 6-7 cf. Mat. 2. 1-2 7 -8cf. Acts 3. 26-38 9-14 af. Gal. 1. 17-18 
20-21 cf. Is. 60. 5 


151 

Dost thou see how many are the powers, and they were 
revealed to us irom the old and the new laws through the 
teaching regarding this precious gem, on which at the be- 
ginning were written the names of the tribes, and it became 
5 completely and fully a parable for those who have souls ? 

It is said again that it is a medical property of this stone 
that its dust cures the venom of adders and vipers and scor- 
pions.So God looked upon the sacrifices and the prayer and the P-60 
beseechings of those righteous leaders and kings of a former 
lOtime. After He had bestowed on them His grace, they ground 
to pieces and trampled upon all the peoples of the heathen 
and their opponents. 

Let us take again another example from the new law 

when the apostles appointed servants who fed the poor and 

^widows, and offered their own selves as a sacrifice. To these 

great ones through zeal was given the power of 'healing 

(pi.) by the grace (pi.) of God. For thus it is said : Behold 

I have given thee the power to charm snakes and scorpions 

and to crush the power of the enemy and naught shall be able 

20 to harm you. 

Of a verity the gem agate has great power, on which is 
inscribed the name' of Asher,from which was shaped the tale 
in the old law and by its spiritual shape it has made the 
church of God full and complete. 


25 9. THE GEM AMETHysT 

The ninth gem is the amethyst, and in the third row is it 
inscribed at the end ; on it is written the name (ms. house) of 
Issachar, which is after the order of his birth. Jacob 
says to him in the blessings : Issachar,the heart hath spoken 
30 good to us ; thou shaltrest among thy portions and findest 
repose. For good also is thy land, for it is fat. Let his shoul- 
ders take hold of the work ; let him become a worker of the p.61 


3-4 Exod. 28. 9-11 14-15 cf . Acts 6. 3-6 17-20 cf. Mk. 16. 17-18 

26-27 Exod.28. 19 29 ff. Gen. 49. 14-15 


7 the dust] ms. tribe 27 name] ms, house 


152 

land . If so it is, through Issachar is shown the labor on the 
land, just as the color of the amethyst when one looks on it, 
its color changing into that of fire. Its color is kindled and 
it appears white in hue and is like wine, i.e., the color of water. 
Thus its appearance is completely varied and again there 5 
are various types of these stones. 

That which is found in the mountains in unwatered places 
is similar in color to the gem hyacinth, being whitish, while 
that which is found in the valleys is like in hue to blood.Those, 
however, which are found by the seaside are also purer, just 10 
as those in the mountains, but that found in snow-clad regions 
is darkish and this is potent, which was stated as to Issachar 
regarding his working in the vineyards. Marvellous is this 
gem and fair to behold. 

So, too, was Issachar eager and meek in- the tilli Eg of his 15 
land among Israel, nor did he ever babble in his drunkenness 
lest haply his sons should insult some one and inherit a curse. 
Of a verity they did not come forth on to the square to the 
base enjoyments of those scribes and Pharisees, who gathered 
by themselves and said : 0, thou art he who destroyest this 20 
temple and raisest it again on the third day . The lot of 
the heritage of Issachar was assigned from Galilee near 
p. 62 Mount Thabor, which the Lord ascended, where there were 
wit h Him Moses and Elijah and others of the disciple's, and 
great divine visions took place here. 25 

Let so much be stated here regarding the gem amethyst, 
whereon was inscribed the name of Issachar,., To him was 
given by blessing a lot of heritage of labor on the land. Come, 
let us now see the spiritual grace of Christ in the blessings, 
how he consecrated the apostles and sent them forth to 30 
labor in all places and gave unto them the Holy Spirit from 
the gra'ce (pi.) of God. For Paul the apostle says thus : 
Of God are we edified ; fellow-workers in God ' are we . 
Simplicity and witlessness are ours, but ever have we wisdom 
and alertness through virtue, that without repose through 35 
divine inspiration they shall accomplish the spiritual labor. 


21-22 Mt. 29, 40 23-25 Mt. 17. 1-3 33 1 Cor. 3. 9 

A 


1 JLOo " 

10. THE GEM PORPHYRY (DZOGEULI). 

The tenth stone is the porphyry (bloodstone) ; this is the 
head of the fourth row in order ; some call it the beryl, but 
it is more the color of porphyry than of the beryl. Upon it 
5 is written the name of Zebulon, who follows in the order 
of the sons of Jacob,in which form was the lot of the heritage 
given unto to him. 

Near to the sea is his abiding place and there came to 
him from all sides the riches of the sea. Ruler he was over 

10 all masters of ships,regarding which also Jacob speaks in his 
blessings : Let Zebulon inherit the sea-coast, and he shall 
order liis sailings near to Sid'on . P- 

Of a verity in good order is the gem bloodstone inscribed, 
for all the riches and the gifts were offered from thence 

15 in the temple of God, for they brought gold from Tarshish 
(T'arshif) by ships which Solomon sent, and they brought 
from remote districts as well tusks of ivory and ostriches and 
apes and other precious stones and stones whose color is 
like gold. To these many names are applied ; some call them 

20Kark'idon and others say they are from. Abiot' and Nabdea 
in Attica and from Aradiay arid some say from Rhodes and 
the men of the lonians say they are from great Rome and 
Spain (Spaniayf), and from all the maritime districts they 
bring profit to one another. To all of these he was a partaker 

25 and an assistant. There was the gem bloodstone found: it 
is called bloodstone, for it emits a brilliancy and is the color 
of gold, and it takes no harm from fire. 

Near to his abiding place is Nazareth of Galilee, in which 
the birth and the conception of Mary were announced by 

30 Gabriel, and there was given to Nazareth the supernal gold 
of this holy maid, where the conception took place. To Na- 
zareth was given the conception and to Bethlehem (Bet'lems) 
the birth whence it became the commencement of the edifice 
(pi.) and in translation Bethlehem is 'house of fruitfulness' ; 


1-3 Exod. 28.20 11-12 Gen. 49. 13 15-19 1 Kings 10. 22 29-30 Lc. 1. 26 

A 

20-23 See the introduction 


154 

Where was the birth of the Lord. Its foundation was laid on 
Sion,for the cross is called the foundation of the church. And 
He Who was crucified became the Saviour, the original 
p ' 64 (e^) of all the faithful ; He first laid the foundation on the 
height of the cross, and the precious stone is preserved on 5 
the bier in Sion. 

He became the edifice of salvation and, after arising from 
the dead, He brought to completion the spiritual edifice, 
by that which He gave forth on the cross, the water and the 
blood from His own foundation that is, for the confirma 1 - 10 
tion of the same in both aspects the water, for He be- 
came the laver of the holy redemption of our sins through 
sprinkling it upon us as a justification and purification 1 , 
whereby we shall become partakers and fellow-dwellers in 
Christ, and after being edified upon the foundation's cor- 15 
nerstones, He dispatches us to the height of heaven. 

For our Lord Jesus Christ became the corner-stone of the 
sides, and firm are the edifices upon Him. In both connec- 
tions He completed the edifice from all the sides of Heaven, 
both by the circumcision and by those of the uncircumcised. 20 
Through the union we were all spiritually edified by the gos- 
pel of truth. This is the gem bloodstone, similar to light in 
appearance and .fair, of the color of gold, and it is found in 
the well which they call the face of the cliff in Babylon of 
the Achaemenids. 25 

Let no one think that it is called Ak'emenidos in vain or 
that there is some profit in attaching the name to Babylon. 
We see this stated in the books frequently and the appellation 
shows in a certain manner that it is for the purpose of instruc- 
tion, for it is said thus : Joshua the son of Nun (Isu Naveysi) 30 
and Jesus the son of Josidech (lisu losedekisman) and Jesus 
p. 65 Sirach (Isu Zirak'isman) and Jesus our Lord. By the employ- 
ment of this name a distinction was made by the form of the 
one, nor does one any speak of or seek out him, who is not like 
the one person, but it portrays the identity of the person 35 


2 cf. Heb. 12. 2 3-4 Colos. 1. 18 8 f. cf. Ephes. 2. 16-22 9-22 cf. 1 Jo 

Ep. 5. 6 ; Jo. 19-24 14-16 cf. Ephes. 2. 16-22 16-20 cf. Ephes. 2. 16- 

31 Sir. 49. 12 ; Ezra 3, 2 ; Hagg. 1. 12, 22 ; Zech. 3. 1. 31-32 Sir. Prol. 22 

A' ' ' !, 

1 was laid] ms. lay 


JKK . 

~~~ JLtJc/ ^^ 

himself, for one speaks of Abraham (Abraam) and means 
thereby Abraham himself, and they say Isaac (Isak), nor 
do they need any other name for him. Thus the name Jacob 
refers to himself alone, but with those who have two names 
Simultaneously so that the one might express his nature, 
for the single appellation proclaims his identity. 

Now Babylon is called Ak'emenidos, for there is another 
Babylon as well a certain castle and tower near to Egypt. 
Now by the giving of the second name it is shown to us which 

lOBabylon it is. A certain person is mentioned whose name 
was Ak'emenidon, who was the father 'of king Cyrus, who 
founded Babylon anew. He gave it a name similar to that 
of his father Babylon Ak'emenidosi. The stone is found 
in it and is a specific for those who suffer from the sto- 

ISmach and the bowels, when one drinks its dust. It is be- 
fitting to mention the names of all the localities, in order 
that we may know whence the gem bloodstone comes, or 
what its appearance is. 
Let us now look at Zebulon, who is inscribed upon the gem 

20bloodstone. The lot of -the heritage of Zebulon (Zabiloni) 
was Nazareth, where there was graciously given to the Vir- 
gin the conception of our Lord Jesus Christ, like to whom is 
the gem bloodstone. On it is inscribed the name of Zebulon, p. 66 
who had great (lit. many) riches from the sea.. Of a verity 

25 gifts were offered from all the quarters of heaven to our Lord 
Jesus Christ, who Himself is the precious cornerstone and 
healed all wounds and ailments (not only evident, but those 
concealed as well) which no one of mankind can do ; but, 
since He is the only begotten Son of God, He performed 

30 mighty feats and bestowed upon His faithful the grace of 
the forgiveness of sins. 

11. THE GEM BERYL (BYVRILIONI). 

The eleventh stone is the beryl (bivrili), which, dark- 
ish in appearance, is radiant and in looks of the color 
35 of sea-water, like the jacinth. There fell to its lot by the order 


21-22 Lc. I. 26 24 cf. Gen. 49. 13 26 Cf. Mt. 21.42 33 Exod. 28.20 

A 


156 

that on it is inscribed by a marvellous provision the name 
of Joseph, for he was the eleventh after the order of his 
brothers, who was yet more marvellously exalted among 
his brethren by the works of God towards him. He changed 
the curses against Reuben into blessings and his destruction 5 
into life. 

For Reuben destroyed the whole honor of his being the 
first-born, for by right there accrued unto Reuben the primo- 
geniture and the priesthood and the kingdom ; but, being 
overcome by the unrestrainedness of his passion,he yielded 10 
to the lusts of his flesh (pi.) and defiled the couch of his 
father : wherefore Jacob was a just judge and condemned 
the lawless acts of Reuben and took away from him the priest- 
hood and the kingdom ; primogeniture had Reuben through 
his birth, but the priesthood and the kingship he took away. 15 
P 67 By a sacrifice he appointed Levi as chief over the trices in 
the priesthood and thenceforward he sought and chose a 
good tribe to be the king. 

He shows the daughter (ms. soul) of the tribe from which 
Christ was to be born. Jacob began in the blessings about 20 
Judah and said : Judah, thy brothers praised thee ; thy 
hands are on the shoulders of thine enemies, and the sons of 
of thy father bow down before thee. A lion's whelp is Judah . 
Dost thou see that the whole kingdom and the honor of powe r 
was given him and he crushed (lit. smote) his enemies beneath 25 
his feet ? Levi and Judah were they who ^received the honor 
of the priesthood and the royal crown. Levi had the priest- 
hood over the tribes, for he gave vent to his vengeance for 
the tyranny of the tribes of his wife. A wife is given as a 
tempter and an aid and a tester to try one's virtue, and to 30 
receive the crown through virtue, for through women all 
are destroyed ; as the son of Sirach says : By the hand of 
a woman we all die , and again by woman we all receive 
life. Verily was this light made to shine forth through Christ. 
Thereby He made to live all who believe in Him, for while 35 


4-6 cf. Deut. 33. 6 9-12 cf. Gen. 35. 22 12-14 cf. Gen. 49. 3-4 16-17 cf,- Deut. 
33. 10 21-23 Gen. 49.9-11 Gen 34. cf. 32-33 Sir. 25 33. 

A C (31 ff) 
19 daughter] ms. soul-possibly correct 


- 15? - 

many inherited from woman shame, disgrace and sin, many 
. became virtuous and received the crown. 

Reuben was draped in shame from a woman ; his priest- 
hood and kingship were destroyed. Joseph spurned the un- 
5 bridled passion of his mistress, was virtuous and grasped p. 68 
the kingdom of the land of Egypt and the power over his 
brethren. Levi again took vengeance for the defiling and 
shame of his sister ; he wreaked vengeance on the lawless 
Sichemites and his race came into the great priesthood. 

10 Judah again through his repentance and continence mas- 
tered his passions, though at one time he yielded to his lust 
for Thamar, his son's wife, but it had been decreed by the 
good providence who joined Thamar to the just race, to 
whose number Matthew j oins her in the Gospel. Judah,ho wever, 

15 thought thus, that in unbridled passion Thamar had fallen 
through whoredom, and he commanded his son's wife to 
be stoned. When, however, he came to realize his deed* 
he said : Thamar is more justified than I, and thencefor- 
ward Judah never touched the woman . 

20 We do not find anywhere that after his deed to Thamar 

he took another wife, nor did. anyone touch Thamar after 

the birth of the true race, and thus by their self-restraint 

they made manifest the deed of their virtue. 

Thus Judah placed a bridle on his passion through his 

25 alertness and virtue and was deemed worthy to enter into the 
kingship and the marvellous birth of Christ, as Matthew the 
evangelist joins him to the number and order of the tribes 
and writes : From Abraham to David fourteen generations ; 
and from David to the captivity by the Babylonians, fourteen P-69 

30 generations, and from the captivity by the Babylonians to 
Christ, fourteen generations . 

He counts clearly the names of the fathers, but of the mo- 
thers he joins none anywhere to the number save four only ; 
of these some are of the heathen and some of those who 


3-4 cf. Gen. 35. 22 4-5 cf.Gen. 39. 7 ff. 5-7 cf.-Gen.41. 4 ff. 

7-9 cf. Gen. 34. 1 ff. 10 f. cf. Gen. 38. 1 ff. 14 Mt. 1. 3. 

15-17 Gen. 38. 24-25 18-19 Gen. 38. 26 28-31 Mt. 1. 17 

A C (1-19) 

18. justified] ms. directed away 


. 158 - 

Walked not in righteousness. He mentions nowhere the 
virtuous women, who were by nature of this race, in the num- 
ber of the generations neither Sarah nor Rebekah nor Leah 
nor Rachel(ms.Sak'eli),who were truly the first.Judah begins 
and says : Judah begat Zarah from Thamar, who seemed 5 
to be despised ; let her be glorified and let it be revealed to 
all that he united her name to the numbers of the genera- 
tions of Judah. . 

Not only does he mention Thamar, but other stranger 
women as well, and joins them to the number thus : P'arezlO 
begat Esrom ; Esrom begat Aram ; Aram begat Aminadab ; 
Aminadab begat Naason ; Naason begat Salmuni ; Salmuni 
' begat Boaz from Raab, and this Rahabivs (sic),is Rahab the 
harlot. Let no one <think> from the number of names 
that some one else is meant. It is the same Rahab Rahab 15 
the harlot ; for many times K'ebron is mentioned, and its 
name is also Ebron ; many a name is thus changed by a pre- 
fix (lit. addition). From this harlot was Boaz ; Boaz begat 
Obed from Ruth, the woman who was in no way related 
to the tribe of Israel, but she was an Ammonite. Ammon 20 
p. 70 again was the 'second child of Lot by his daughter, for she 
was the second child in the number of tribes, as Lot had mar- 
ried a wife from Sodom. 

And all this which took place gave consolation to all to 
await in hope. For him who wishes to press forward to good 25 
things there is no respite ; so, too, toward evil they run of 
their own accord. Because of this wise and through the in- 
scription the holy evangelist Matthew adds them to the number 
and says : Boaz begat Obed from Ruth ; Obed begat Jesse ; 
Jesse begat David ; David begat Solomon from the wife of 30 
Uriah, who is Bersheba (Bersabey) herself, since in every 
manner the affairs of Bersheba were known what they were 
or that she was the wife of Uriah. Therefore he never 
mentions her name, for through the name of Uriah it was 


5 Mt. 1. 3 10-13 Mt. 1. 3-5 ; Ruth 4. 18-22 18-20 Mt. 1. 5 20-21 cf. Gen. 
19. 38 29-21 Mt. 1. 5-6 32 cf. 2 Sam. 11. 27, 12.24 

A 

4 Rachel] ms. Sak'eli 12 Naason thrice in ms, 


. 150- 

clear to all. The name of Ruth, however, was nowhere ex- 
plainable without the mention of her name or either from 
that of her husband or if it had been stated by the ancients. 
So was it in the case of Rahab, and likewise of Thamar. 
5 It is not, however, that it is some one of the more virtuous 
of the women of a former time who is mentioned, who had 
been notable among Israel and ,had been duly married, but 
he mentions <f our> women of stranger tribes whohad not been 
duly married. But all know this, and although it is those 

10 who were not of the race of Abraham who are mentioned, 
the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ in similar wise through 
His birth in the flesh caused the sins of many to be removed 
and joined them to righteousness. It was not through sin, 
however, God forbid ! for those who committed sin, even P-71 

15 though they were in the race, could not separate themsel- 
ves from Christ but, after being drawn away from sin 
and being brought near to the works of righteousness, they 
are joined to the family and the company of the righteous, 
having become partakers in the good hope of Christ, Who 

20 came and became a man, the only-begotten Son of God, and 
gathered those dispersed through His birth from the only 
virgin who was of both the race of the circumcised and 
the uncircumised. By His mercy He redeemed (lit. made 
to live) those who had fallen away from the law ; for He is 

25 Himself the cornerstone and likewise the one and only 
one, for He founded the wall upon Himself and fused the 
two together with Himself and joined them to righteousness,so 
that none of the circumcised could boast that from them 
alone came forth the fruit of righteousness. 

30 But say to the Israelites who believed in Christ that He 
is the true rock which was rejected of the builders ; for 
all of us He is the precious gem who came our Lord Jesus 
Christ and allied Himself with both sides, with Rahab the 
stranger, whose sins He drove out, and with Salomon the Is- 

35 raelite of the tribe of Judah and again with Thamar of the 
Philistines and Judah of the tribe of Abraham the blessed ; 


19 cf. Ephes. 1. 12 26 Ephes. 2. 16 ff 30-31 Mt. 20. 42 ; Lc. 20. 17 

A Ar (11 ff) G (34 f) 
15 could not] ms. at some time 34 msi Solomon 


-166- 

with Ruth of the Ammonites and the Sodomites and Boaz 

of Judah and of the tribe 

(one leaf lost from the manuscript) 

and envy is poison and an evil wild beast; the evil 

wild beast devours and the evil wild beast drags down its 5 
p. 72 prey ; of a verity ungoverned envy is an evil beast and on 
the instant the house of Jacob supposed that his son was 
dead. But Joseph was appointed king over Egypt and it 
was not Joseph who was dyed in blood, but his garment. 
In like manner Israel raised its (lit. their) hands against its 10 
Saviour. 

ON FAITH. 

On the Godhead it was impossible to lay hands ; for the 
nature of divinity is unharmable ; though the flesh of the 
Lord exuded blood, Christ is uninjurable. Again Christ did 15 
<not> suffer, but the flesh of the Lord did. It was not that 
He was separated from the divine nature,but He was indes- 
structible from the divine nature, which was united with 
the flesh ; for the nature of the Godhead suffered no harm, 
but was itself together with the humanity by free will, 20 
seeing that the indestructible nature of each of these was 
the passion of Christ in the flesh for us. For it was not 
that His suffering was separated nor that His humanity was 
removed, but that the unity of the Son of God was insepa- 
rable and indivisible and He abides in the unity of the God- 25 
head and His humanity as one Lord, one Christ. 

If the Lord of Glory had made Himself known, they would 
not have crucified Him. He is called the Lord of Glory and 
His humanity is by union with the Godhead. As a garment is 
moistened with blood and this is dyed *in the garment, but 30 
with the moistening of the blood they think of no other 
garment than that of Christ, with His blood on the garment. 
His death is called the garment which He put on. Although 


4 cf. Gen. 37. 20 6-8 Gen. 37. 34 ff. 8 Gwi. 37. 31 25 1 Cor. 2. 8 

32 2Qor. 5.2 f 

A Ar(l-2) G (1-3) 

12 On Faith] in margin in red 33 is called] twiee in ms: 

possibly a lacuna 


- 161 - 

Joseph was not dead, this was said ol his flesh,which donned P. ft 
the garment, and the dyeing of his flesh with blood made 
it dark ; the garment, however, was dyed with blood ; they 
do not think; however, of the dyeing of blood in the gar- 
oment, but of Him who donned it. 

So, too, His sufferings could not be in His Divinity but 
were added to His Godhead, so that for us there might be 
salvation coming from God and lest our hope should be in 
man and not in God. For it is written ; Cursed be he who 

lOplaceth his trust in man . Let no one say that the Godhead 
suffered ; it donned the garments of suffering, even though it 
was untouched by suffering, as if it were that the sufferings 
were conscious of His being untouched by sufferings (d- 
naOetct), in order that by the garment of His suffering our 

15 suffering and death might be abolished. 

So, too, in the house of Israel even unto this day is the 
name of Christ mentioned and Christ the King is the Lord, 
just as the sons of Jacob had the garment of Joseph and they 
told their father of the death of Joseph and Joseph was ruling 

20 over the Egyptians. 

In the same wise did the Jews have the flesh of Him who 
was crucified, like to the garment of Joseph, and through 
precaution they laid Him on a bier, and for yet greater caution 
sealed up the sepulchre. They besought Pilate to order the 

25 soldiers to guard the sepulchre through caution and just as 
the house of Jacob had the garment of Joseph (losep'isasa), 
and Joseph (losebi) ruled Egypt, so also Christ, the King p. 74 
of all, descended into Hell, and the great King Christ loosed 
the bonds of Adam, which had been fastened by the evil ty- 

30 rant. He bound the tyrant and slew the tyranny of the devil, 
which is death, and despoiled his house, which is (pi.) the 
abysses of hell. He led forth captive those enslaved by death 
and rescued the souls of all from the dominion of ignorance 
and from the commission of sins and from bitter anger. All 

35 this the great King Christ Jesus did through His might. 


9-10 Jer. 17. 5 18-19 Gen. 37. 32 23 Mt. 27. 66 23-25 Mt. 27. 63-65 

27-33 cf. Gospel of Nicodemus 


162 

' i ' 

Let no one think that He did this alone, that He freed those 

only who were under sin, but understand also from this fig- 
ure that He also removed sin and the power of sin, death, 
He slew, and free J all from sin and death, and remov- 
ed the power of death, that is, his tyranny. Those, 5 
however, who from thenceforward gave birth to the 
thought of deceit and involved themselves in sin because of 

their transgressions < > , 

but it is impossible to stop the resurrection, for the power 
of death perished. It is not, however, that those who sinned 10 
arid did not repent of their transgressions were not judged, for 
it is stated thus : He who led forth the captives by His 
valor together with those who were afflicted and those who 
were confined to the biers >, and not only is it said those who 
p 75 were afflicted' but also those who cause suffering and those 15 
too who are afflicted. 

For at the resurrection of Christ many of the dead arose 
who had been buried on their biers. It is said that many of 
the saints arose who were buried on their biers. 

CONCERNING THE RESURRECTION OF THE DEAD. 20 

It is said that many of the saints arose and entered along 
with Him into the holy city of Jerusalem and their resurrection 
was a mighty marvel which bore testimony to the resurrec- 
tion of the Lord. For those who rose were men of tall figure 
(fort, adults) and mature in years (lit. days), who knew "how 25 
to converse and had understanding. Some were about thirty 
and some about twenty years of age, so that brother could 
recognize brother, and father son, and son father. And 
each of their relatives and acquaintances asked those who 
had risen : Is this thy name ? , and they answered : 30 
That is my name . They say : To this place am I come, 
having risen from, the bier, and by tnis name they call you ! 
The ones ask : Whence are ye come ? These answer them : 


12-13 cf. Gospel of Nicodemus 18-19 Mt. 2 1 ?. 52-53 

A 

20 On the resurrection of the dead] in margin in red 


162 N 

We rose and came ; and they answered one another, son 
to lather and father to son: What was it? How did 
ye rise"? . 

Those who had risen answered and said : Three days 

5 since what took place among you? And the tribe of Israel 

was careless and forgetful ; they answered and said to those 

who had arisen : Of what matter do ye speak ? Here 

naught has taken place . 

Those who had risen made reply : Know ye not that p. 76 

10 the earth quaked and the abysses gaped and the nether- 
most depths of hell were destroyed? What was it ye did 
on that day, or what was this matter? 

Then these remembered and said : We seized a certain de- 
ceiver called Jesus and crucified him x. Those who had risen, 

15 however, lifted up their voices and said : Woe unto you ! 
He it was Who came unto us ; He destroyed the walls of 
hell and severed the bonds of death through His might and 
caused us to rise up from our biers . 

The saying was fulfilled in which it is said : Let the dead 

20 rise and let all be exalted, who have dwelt on the biers , 
and the Lord of Life shall show that He has by his power 
severed the bonds of the souls who were confined in Ha- 
des, thanks to His descent into hell, in order that noiie 
might say that He led forth the souls alone from Hades ; 

25 for this purpose He caused to arise the flesh (pi.) of many 
of the saints. By giving unto them flesh the souls came 
and entered the city of Jerusalem and those whose souls 
had been oppressed and confined in Hades and their flesh 
on the biers, rising in the soul and the flesh, entered the 

30 city and revealed themselves to many and reminded those 

who had made the Lord to suffer. Those who had seized and 

beaten their Lord were the witnesses of His resurrection. 

Well is the gem beryl placed in its order. Darkish it 

is, of the color of blood and dullish, like to the bloodstained 

35 garment of Jacob, which the brothers moistened with blood 


15-16 Ps. 18. 4-5; Ps. 116. 3; Acts 2. 24 19-20 cf. Is. 26. 19 
34 f . Gen. 37. 25. 


164 

p. 77 and presented to their father Jacob. Well again are the 
colors of the gem beryl inscribed rthey signify the quietness 
and meekness and purity of Joseph (losebissa), he who by 
his wisdom arrived at dominion and the affection of 
Pharaoh and of the Egyptians and of the whole world. 5 
In such wise is the gem beryl inserted in the crown of kings. 
It is set in the crown and in the adornment of women of 
noble race and is mounted also in the signet of princes and 
great men. The gem beryl adorns all of them, for it is 
esteemed by all. All this significance is to be seen in the gem 10 
beryl. 

Now shall I begin to discourse on the twelfth stone, which 
is the total and the consummation of all the stones, which 
are mounted on the oracular tablet of. the law. 

12. THE GEM ONYX (P'RTSKHILI). 15 

The twelfth gem is the onyx, and its color is a deep red. 
It pleaseth the daughters of royalty and of the rich and of 
potentates. They make it into a drinking- vessel and do not 
part from it. There is another gem onyx also like unto this one, 
whose color is white, like that of clear glass, and resembling 20 
marble. In it there are many colors spread out like to 
scarlet and it is fair to behold. Its size is large enough to 
make of it a drinking cup. We have, however, nowhere 
p. 78 found mention of the place whence it comes, yet we have 
heard a report as follows, that it is found in the land of 25 
India, Ethiopia, the region of the Thebais and in many 
other places as well. 

Marvellous is this gem, on which is carved and depicted 
and inscribed the name of Benjamin after the order of the 
sons of Israel. This was the youngest of the sons of Jacob ; 39 
so, too, is this gem the last and the completion of the ora- 
cular plate. Benjamin was the youngest and he had the 
priority of the kingship over all Israel ; for Saul, the son of 
Kish (Kisisi), was of the tribe of Benjamin, who first ruled 


4-5 cf. Gen. 41. 41f. 16 Exod. 28. 20 32 Gen. 35. 18 32! I Sam. 9. 1. H. 
AC (6f) 


165 

over the sons of Israel, and judges were appointed from this 
tribe, who judged Israel as kings. And other princes and 
mighty men arose from this tribe,of whom Saul became king, 
until the reign of David, who was of the tribe of Judah. 
5 After the captivity of the Babylonians many arose from 
this tribe who saved Israel. Of the tribe of Benjamin was 
Esther, the daughter of Aminadab, the paternal uncle of 
Mordfecai (Marduk'ey). Of this tribe also was Mordecai, 
the son of Jair (laerisi), who were great leaders and teachers 

10 of Israel. From the tribe of Benjamin there previously 
appeared Saul as the king who saved Israel from its enemies, 
and after the captivity of Babylon was Esther of the tribe 
of Benjamin, by whom the captives were saved. Verily 
is the appearance of this gem onyx a marvel. 

15 It is called again in the law a sacrifice of sweet savors when 
they mingle sweet odors and make smoke offerings, and they 
say this is the sacrifice, onyx and stacte and galbanum 
and onyx (sic). Again there is another onyx as well, when 
one mixes perfumes and prepares this mixture in pottery 

20 (lit. porcelain) of the onyx stone and, pouring them into 
this, they mix the odoriferous unguents. 

Now, in order not to protract our tale of all the nature 
of the onyx and of the sacrifices and the unguents by 
taking up a long time, I shall now pass it over in silence in 

25 this place, and shall begin to tell of the other things in 
their due order. 

Rightly is the name Benjamin inscribed on the gem onyx, 
for the onyx is beloved of kings and greatly loved by 
brides, of a verity because of his lowliness and meekness,for 

30 he was the defender (lit. back) and guardian of himself 
and his brother Joseph (loseb). Of a verity did Joseph 
rightly love Benjamin and gave to him a share five times 
more than his brethren. Benjamin was the beloved of 
his father and of his brothers, for he himself and his tribe 

35 were bowmen and warriors and saved Israel in many places. 


1-2 Judges 3. 15 6-8 Esther 2. 7 8-9 Esther 2. 5 10-11 I Sam. 9.1 

12-13 Esther 2. 7 15-18 Exod. 30. 34 ff. 18-21 Exod. 30, 23 ff. 30-31 

cf. Deut. 33. 12 31-33 Gen. 43. 34 

AC 


166 

Benjamin was beloved of God also, for he received Je- 
rusalem as his share of the heritage, where both the temple 
and the altar were built, where victims of sacrifice were of- 
fered to God. He was the first to be appointed king and 
p. 80 yielded the power to Judah and after the captivity saviours 5 
were to appear from the tribe of Levi over the race of Is- 
rael. "" 

Of a verity, after all the apostles, there appeared as the 
chosen one Paul the apostle from the tribe of Benjamin : 
just as Benjamin was the last of his brothers, so was this-10 
one (Paul) chosen later and, like Benjamin, was he beloved 
of all, like the gem onyx. So, too, Paul the apostle was fair 
and beloved of the churches and the chosen vessel of all the 
faithful ; just as the gem onyx is beloved of kings and brides 
and they prepare from it their drinking vessels. Verily 15 
Paul was ordained by God apostle to the holy bride of 
Christ, which is the church ; she grasps the spiritual drink- 
ing-vessel, which was graciously bestowed upon her by 
God. 

They read the book of the Apostle (i.e., Acts) .and the 20 
apostolic letters (i.e., Catholic Epistles) at one time during 
the year, but the book of Paul every day (pi.) and every 
hour (pi.) ; by this spiritual vessel they moisten and bring 
gifts to the church of God. 

This is the share of Benjamin, five times the share of his 25 
brethren ; and again the goblet of Joseph (losebisi) was 
found in the sack of Benjamin, which some one had placed 
there. Samuel the prophet said this to Saul the king, who 
was of the tribe of Benjamin : Thine are the good thing,: of 
Israel and of the house of thy father . What, then, are the 30 
good things of Israel 

p. 81 These are the holy thoughts which appeared ; they were 
brought as offerings by Paul the apostle. Of a verity the 
gifts and precious things are of Saul the king of Israel 
and all the good things of the house of Israel, but above and 35 


1-2 Joshua 18.28 9 Phil. 3,5 13 Acts 9. 15 17 f. cf. Ephes. 5. 22 ff. 

25-26 cf. Gen. 43. 34. 26-28 Gen. 44. 12 29-30 1 Sam. 9. 20 

AC 


167 ' 

beyond this Paul exhibits this in himself : If they are of 
the Israelites, so I am ; if they are of the tribe of Abraham, I 
am also : and again he says : A Hebrew of the <H> e- 
brews, of the race of Abraham, from the company of Ben- 
5jamin, by the law a Pharisee. And I was of the law of 
my fathers, a seeker after vengeance , and the rest which 
he says in its order. Therefore is it written concerning him 
and it is stated in the one hundred and sixteenth psalm : 
I believed what I did (or, shall) say . He became a fellow- 

lOsinger along with David. 

Paul the apostle says there also in his letters (or,books) : 
And we too believe whereof we speak . David here speaks 
of this particular connection and this was spiritually ful- 
filled in Paul, for he said : I too believe this whereof I speak, 

15 which we believe . When he was going to Damascus 
and the Lord revealed Himself from Heaven and said: 
Saul, Saul, why hast thou set about to persecute me ? 
And Saul said : Who art thou, Lord ? Christ said : I 
am Jesus whom thou persecutest [me] : and after this he 

20 said : Go thou into the city and there it shall be told 
thee what it befits thee to do. And then it says : He arose 
and could not see. They took my hand and I entered the 
city . This the psalm says afterwards : And I was greatly 
abashed. 

25 For before he says : Having mounted a chariot in great 
pride, I set forth in self-adulation, and like a beggar was 
I led in by the hand ; for first my mind (pi.) was darkened, p 82 
for I was an antagonist of God, but now God hath darkened 
my eyes, that he might admonish me and that the eyes of 

30 my heart might be opened and that I might come to the 
knowledge of God . Verily this it is that David says : 'And 
I was greatly abashed' ; God admonished me : He removed 
my desires from me and humbled me. He made manifest 
upon me His awfulness ; I was amazed and I know and now 

35 being held by the hand I enter Damascus . 

Concerning which also he says : I said in my amazement ; 


1-3 2 Gor. 11. 22. 3-5 Phil. 3. 5 5-6 of. Gal. 1.14 9 PS. 116, 10 12 2 Qor. 4. 13. 
14-15 ibid. 15-31 Acts 9, 3 ff. ; 22. 6 ff ; 26,12 ff. 30-31 Ps. 116,10 31 P. ll.ll 

AC 


168 

'every man is false'. Of a verity it is a thing of marvel, 
for first in the chariot and now like a beggar I am led by 
the hand ; first Saul and now Paul ; before I was a perse- 
cutor and now an apostle. Verily is it fitting I should speak. 
I said in my amazement : 'Every man is false',for every one 5 
whom I heard in Jerusalem was a scoffer. I took letters 
(or, books) from them so that whenever I went in to the 
high priests, they forsooth lied and said : 'His disciples have 
stolen away beforehand Him who rose', and they called 
the Lord a man, and they called Him who converted 10 
those who were led astray a deceiver. Verily in my fall 
and in my blindness <said I> all men are liars, for He 
who died and was buried and was stolen by his disciples, 
now when He spake unto me from Heaven and said 
It was the Word only . The blindness of the eyes kindles 15 
and illumines the mind of the blinded. 

After this, when he came to Damascus and his eyes 
were enlightened, he believed in our Lord Jesus Christ ; 
he spake and preached in the path of truth and after all 
~)p. 83 this he received by grace from the Lord in place of these 20 
evils, being stripped naked because of them, good deeds of 
justice. He gave thanks and said : What shall I repay the 
Lord for all the things He hath given me ? I was a perse- 
cutor : He made me worthy of the apostleship ;I was a blas- 
phemer : He made me worthy of the divine visions of hea- 25 
ven ; through my ignorance I abode in temptation : He 
revealed unto me great thoughts and terrible . 

And he says : What shall I repay the Lord for all this 
which He hath given me ? What can resemble the recompense 
of the death of the Son of God, save the draught which our 30 
Lord Jesus Christ drank ? Now have I received this draught 
of life ; I will call on the name of the Lord . This it is which 
he says : The death of Christ has taken place within me . 
Regarding this too the Lord spake to the disciples : The 
draught which is for me to drink ye too can drink . In 35 


3 Acts 13. 9 5 Ps. 116. 11 6-7 Acts 9. 2 12 Ps. 116. 11 22-23 Ps. 116. 12 
28-29 Ps. 116. 22 29-31 cf. 1 Cor. 11. 25 31-32 Ps. 116. 13 34-35 Mk. 10. 39. 

AC 


169 

eager emulation of this Paul said : I have received the cup 
of life and I call on the name of the Lord . And he says : 
Even unto death, even though sorrows may come because 
of the name of the Lord, I did not deny Him, neither in the 
5 open nor in the narrows. I shall not forsake nor shall 
I draw aside from the name of the Most High , and that 
this is the case the following text reveals : ((Honored is the 
death of the saints before the Lord , and the rest which he 
says in its order. 

10 Verily goo d and fair is the goblet made from the onyx stones, 
which the bride, that is the church, grasped. For she came 
and Benjamin revealed Paul from his own tribe, who gaveP- 
to drink the draught of the knowledge of God and of joy 
to all the quarters of heaven and received fivefold the share 

15 for his labor, as it was with Benjamin : for he says thus : 
Five times have I suffered : it appears that he ran to 
receive in five-fold form the task of one person ; as he him- 
self says : I have exerted myself more than all , and in 
order not to give praise to himself, he says : Not I, but the 

20 grace which was given me . 

Of a verity Benjamin is a ravening wolf, who eateth his 
prey at the dawn, and at even he prepared it and he gathered 
it. Benjamin became a youth renewed through Paul, for in 
his youth, like a wolf, Paul ravened and champed the bones 

25 and the flesh of many. This it is which he says Let him eat 

the food in the morning and the same at eventide . When 

he reached maturity he received spiritual food and spread 

his teaching divinely upon all. 

There was a time when he destroyed and ravaged those 

30 who were believers in Christ, while he again sprinkled him- 
self and nurtured himself : for as he says : I spread them 
abroad and I give , and again he says : This is Benjamin, 
the marvellous youth, as the divine books say . And he does 
not say 'Benjamin' only, but there is not only Benjamin, 

35 but likewise he says there 'the youth', and who is it whom 
he mentions the youngest of the brethren. 


1-2 Ps. 116. 13 7-8 Ps. 116. 15 16 2 Cor. 11. 24 18 ibid. 19-20 1 Cor. 
15. 10 21-23 cf. Gen. 49. 27 25-26 ibid. 31-32 ? 32-33 Ps. 68. 27 

AC 

14 received] ms. he paid back 


170 

But Paul of the tribe of Benjamin became a youth through 
chance ( or, conflict) and afterwards became a chosen apostle, 

85 nor was it there in Jerusalem that the divine miracle was 
revealed to him/ but on his journey to Damascus, for it 
says there : Benjamin was marvellous in his youth . So 5 
too Paul, trembling and amazed, said Who art thou, Lord? 
There was a voice which said unto Paul : I am Jesus whom 
thou persecutest [mel , and he was amazed at the great 
miracle ;he cast off from himself unwittingness and stubborn- 
ness and received the grace of wisdom from the Holy Spirit ; 10 
he became a chosen vessel and the leader of the churches. 
This it is which he says : There is Benjamin, the marvellous, 
youth . 

Let us come and behold this patent marvel ; how fair 
to see is the diadem'd bride of the church, who is of those 15 
blessings of the divine Spirit, as is stated in the Song of 
Songs (lit. praises), that is, the blessing of blessings: Thy 
neck is like the iron stem of a candlestick and as carmine, 
like unto ivory bone, and thread are thy lips (sic) : the 
tips of thy fingers are like the tips of the trees .of Lebanon 20 
(Libaney) which looks directly over at Damascus' site . 
Now, deceiving one another, these words are interpreted 
as follows ; Christ has been defined as the head and the apost- 
les as the lips, the two eyes are the laws. The nostrils are they, 
the holy apostles^ who received the breath of sweet savor and 25 
carried it through the whole world. They said : We are the 
perfume of Christ, for some from life to life and for some from 
death to death , and the rest which he says in its order. 

86 The tips of thy fingers like the tips of the trees of Lebanon 
(Libanisani), for Lebanon is near to Damascus. 30 

This seems not to be spoken concerning the beauty of 
women, for the growth of the tips of the nails like the tips 
of the trees is a great blemish. This is said of the church and 
to the apostles,for Paul received letters (or, books) from the 
high-priests, and came to Damascus, near the base of Lebanon. 35 
Instruction was given him from heaven and the breath of 


5-8 Acts 9. 3 ff. 4, 12-13 Ps. 68. 27 17-21 cf. Song of Songi 7. 4, 4. 4 
26-28 2 Gor. 2. 15-16. 

AC(l-2) 


171 

sweet savor and he heard the name of tho Lord Jesus. This 
is it which he says : As a sweet smelling ointment thy name 
is spread abroad , and the grace of sweet odors was granted 
to Paul by the name of Christ. He spread abroad and filled 
5 by the guidance (or, teaching) of his sweet savor all the quar- 
ters of heaven with great beauty; the gem onyx made us 
to enjoy through its great beauty, on which is inscribed the 
name of Benjamin. ^ 

It was the end and consummation of the square set of 

10 stones, which were worked and cut out and set in the plate 
of the law. In so iar as I have been able, I have set forth the 
place of origin (lit. finding) and the appearance of these pre- 
cious stones, even as thy precious self requested me ; although 
thy commands unto me were great and beyond me, I have 

15 followed my love and obedience before thee. 

Let now thy virtuous self take and accept these unclothed 
thoughts of mine and should aught be omitted or wanting, p . 57 
let it be supplied of thy all-embracing love and wisdom, for 
love endures everything.By all it is believed,by all is it hoped 

20 for. Love sees no self-satisfaction ; love is not proud ; love is 
not ashamed ; but love through everyone is in every one ; 
, hence it hath divine power. 

But now glory unto God from every part ; although my 
understanding is lacking, our wisdom was the greater ; my 

25 mind (pi.) became wise though thy commands; although 
we were not equal in knowledge to those commands of thine 
regarding these twelve stones, the light of understanding 
was spread upon us. If great wisdom is necessary to trans- 
late a word (or, discourse) from the tongue of the Romans 

30 (P'romint'a) into that of the Greeks, how much more was it 
necessary to me, because of thy love it fell to my lot to ex- 
press the divine thought concealed in the law. Of a verity 
didst thou order me to set hand to that which was beyond 
my power ; although it was highly complicated more than 

35 my mind could grasp , yet Was grace granted to my profit 
by the Lord God through thy prayers and those of many. 
The preciousness of thy love became an image for us. 


2-3 cf. 2 GOP. 2. 14 19-22 cf. 1 Cor. 18. 4 ft. 
A 


~ 172 

Now let there be praise from every mouth for the Father 
through the Son and for the Son through the Father in con- 
junction with the Holy Spirit for ever and for the ages of 
ages. Amen. 

(Gap in the archetype of the Georgian version not noted 5 
in the MS. We adduce the corresponding portion of the 
Latin text as edited by O.Gunther, CSEL 35. 2, p.756, 13 ff) 


46 Hie iam nunc quaeritur, quibus modis eum ordinem conse- 
quentiae, qui est certissimus et congruens, approbemus 10 
nam per duodecim tribus duodecim lapides apponi iussi sunt, 
ita ut unus lapis uni tribui coaptaretur et ad singularum 
nomina decernantur singuli lapides. et si quidem declarasset 
iussio, cui tribui quis lapis aptetur, milla prorsus inquisitio 
superesset ad indagandam definitionem diuinitus ordinatam, 15 
sed ad exponendam nobis uim lapidum tantummodo studiosa 

47 relinqueretur intentio : nunc autem non est determinatum 
sed simpliciter in duobus locis horum lapidum consequentiam 
et compositionis eorum speciem fateamur adscriptam, sicut 
in rationali, quod super pectus ponebatur pontificis, et super- 20 

48humerali per duos anulos aureos in eo disposito. qui anuli 
per extremitates suas rationale in medio continebant, rursus 
annexis superioribus anulis, qui erant in superhumerali 
pontificis in utraque humeri parte conserti. nam et super- 
humerale, cum esset unum per circuitum, uno prorsus ori- 25 
ficio claudebatur, habens uittam hyacinthinam auro com- 
p. 757 plexam | et hinc a dextris unum anulum et a sinistris alterum, 
per utramque humeri partem prominentes, anulos ad iugulum 
pontificis innuentes, qui rursus ex utraque rationalis parte 
spectabantur appositi, ita ut perinde conecterentur et coap-30 
tarentur in sese, per duos scilicet anulos rationalis et duos 
anulos superhumeralis, ubi erant catenulae aureae desuper 


11 singulorum V, corr. Fogg. 20 dispositos V, correxit Gil 

1821, cf. Exod. 28, 914 (39, 67). 28 innuentes V ; 

innectentes Fogg. rationali V, correxit Gil. 


173 

imminentes. hoc autem rationale, sicuti dixi, habebat duo* 49 
decim lapides sibi congruenter insertos atque composites 
quadrate ordine, qui sic intertexti probantur, ut est subter 
annexum. primus ordo atque superior a laeua parte pontificis 
5 uersus ad dextram hos lapides habebat apppsitos : sardium, 
topazion, smaragdum. oportet enim et hoc diligentius an- 50 
notare, unde scilicet incipiebat compositio et ubi iterum desi- 
nebat, sciendumque quod iuxta Hebraicarum elementa litte- 
rarum ita compositiones istae f iebant : scribunt quippe 

loHebraei a sinistris ad dextram cuiuslibet rei subiectum 
ordinem perducentes, ipsi uero manum subsequentem litteris 
a dextris habere uidentur ad laeuam. erant ergo super 
pontificis pectus a sinistris eius ordines ad dexteram perdu- 
centes. primus ordo, sicut iam dixi, sardius topazius smarag- 51 

15 dus ; secundus autem carbunculus sapphirus iaspis ; tertius 
liguiius achates amethystus ; quartus qui et ultimus, chryso- 
lithus beryllus onychinus. rursus inuenimus eosdem lapides 52 
in duabus superhumeralis partibus positos, in quibus duo 
lapides catenulis aureis uidebantur inserti iuxta utrumque 

20latus humerorum, iam non ex diuersis lapidibus sed ex sma- 
ragdo tantummodo, erantque rursus nomina filiorum Is- 
rael secundum praeceptum domini scripta atque scalpta in 
duobus istis lapidibus. non tamen euidenter ostenditur, 53 
quod nomen in parte dextera prasini lapidi inscribi debeat 

25 uel quod in sinistra parte, sicut ipse decreuit, similiter anno- 
tari, nisi quod prorsus | intellegendum est, quia sex nomina p. 758 
scripta erant in sinistra parte et sex in dextera filiorum 
Israel, nee enim poterat unus' lapis nomina duodecim tribuum 
capere propter rotunditatem suam. sed nee praecepit deus, 

30 ut dupliciter inscribantur duodecim tribus in parte "dextera 

et in sinistra duodecim, sed simpliciter ait:impressione 

signaculi nominum filiorum Israel, sicut 


17-23 cf. Exod. 28, 9-14 (39, 6-9). 31-32 fcxod. 36. 36, 13 (LXX). 

7 iterum V ; item Fogg, 8 <est>quod Fogg. 8-9 littarum 
V 9 iste V 24 lapidis Fogg. 29 deus V; dominus Fogg 

31 impressione [scripsit Gii. (cf. infra ad u. 19 ; in pressione V 

32 nominum om. Fogg. 


.*. 174 

habet ipsa circumstantia lectionis, quam nunc ad uerbum 
curauimus exprimere, in qua ipsum quoque pontificatus 

54 off icium praeceptum est ordinari. sic ait : e t f e c e r u n t 
sup er burner ale ex ajuro et hyacintho 
etpurpuraetcocc'o cum bysso retort a**. 5 
opus textile fecerunt illud, superb u- 
meralia continentia sese ex utrisque 
part ib us, opus textile, inuicem com- 
plectentia s e per circuitum. ex ipso 
fecerunt iuxta eius facturam, ex auroio 
et hyacintho et pu r p ura et cocco neto 
et bysso retort a, sicut praecepit domi- 
nus Mosi. fecerunt utrosque lapides 
smaragdi confibulatos et conclusos a u- 
ro, scalptos impressione signaculi no-15 
minum filiorum Israhel, et imposue- 
runt eos in humeros superhumeralis, 
lapides monumenti filiorum Israhel, si- 

55 cut praecepit Moyses. haec duo .loca sunt horum 
lapidum et appellationes eorum, quae secundum tribum prae- 20 
ceptae sunt annotari : unus quidem locus est in hoc rational! 
et alter in his quae dicuntur **in hippodromoCha- 
p . 759 br at ha. | 

56 Oportet itaque primitus hanc diuisionem nosse et ordinis 


3-19 Exod. 36, 9-14 (LXX). 21-22 Gen. 48, 7 (LXX). 


5 post retorta add. etc. Fogg. : Gu. lacunam indicat ; propter ho- 
moteleuton intercidemnt ea, quae plus habet uersio LXX interpretum 
11 iacintho y cocconeto y, distinxit Gil, (xoxxivov diavevrja^vov 
LXX) 12 bisso y 15 impressione restituit Gil. ; in pressione V (ye- 
y^v^dvovi; [teal exxexoA.a[i[ievov<;] eyttohafifta a<pQayido<; LXX) 
19 moises V 22 lacunam indicauit Gu adsentiens Fogginio haec ad- 
notanti ; iamvero, ni fallor, inter ea multa, quae hie deesse puto, 
S. Doctorem exposuisse crediderim, quomodo duodecim tribus a filiis 
lacob nomen acceperint, quot uxores lacob duxerit, quern filium ha- 
buerit ultimum et his similia tandemque narrasse quomodo Rachel 
Beniamino edito partus dolore confecta mortem obierit in terra Cha- 
naan in Hippodromo Chabratha et sic narrationem confecisse uerbis 
nimirum *=LXX* 4 quod V; quae Fogg. 


^ 175 -* 

conseqiiehtiam, quae secundum aetatem est singiilofum, id 
est Ruben Simeon Leui ludas ; propter iurgium uero Ru- 
chelis et quod data sit lacob ancilla Balla, nascitur iuxta ae- 
tatis ordinem post ludam Dan statimque de ipsa ancilla se- 
5 cundus editur Neptalim. deinde per aemulationem Lia uero 
dedit ancillam uiro Zelpham, quae concipiens peperit Gad, 
dein. Aser. rursus adiecit uxor Lia ut conciperet : quae iuxta 
conscientiam peperit Isachar, exin Zabulon. nouissime uero 
de Rachele Joseph nascitur et deinde Beniamin. et est ista 

10 consequentia : Ruben Simeon Leui ludas, Dan et Neptalim, 
Gad et Aser, Isachar et Zabulon, loseph et Beniamin. haec 
quidem prima est compositio iuxta aetatis consequential!!. 

Cum uero peruenirent de Mesopotamia reuertente lacob 57 
in terram Chanaan, secunda f it diuisionis enumeratio. fecit 

15 enim lacobi tres turmas discernens proprios filios, et posuit 
Zelpham et Ballam duas ancillas faciens unam turmam in 
primis cum quattuor filiis earum,id est Dan et Neptalim, Gad 
et Aser ; in secunda uero turma ordinauit Liam cum 
sex filiis eius, non iam secundum aetatem sed secundum matris 

20 aff ectionem, Ruben dico et Simeon, Leui et ludam, Isachar 
et Zabulon; ipse uero postremus mansit cum Rachele et 
loseph ualde paruulo. Beniamin autem in matris adhuc utero 
portabatur. et haec secunda discretio compositionis eiusdem 
numeri comprobatur. 

25 Tertius autem numerus est iuxta aliam compositionem 58 
diuisionis. incipiens enim lacob intrare in Aegyptum, sicut 
super annexum est,congregatis in id ipsum filiis Liae simul|p. 760 
et ancillae eius Zelphae consequenter, uelut ex eadem domina 
progenitis, ita dinumerantur ipsi : Ruben Simeon Leui ludas 

30 Isachar Zabulon et ex Zelpha Gad et Aser ; deinde Rachelis 
filii loseph et Beniamin, hi qui ex eius ancilla sunt Dan et 
Neptalim. 

Quarta diuisio est compositionis et numeri, quando bene-59 
dixit lacob filiis suis, cum moreretur ; oportet enim secundum 
tempus et in numeros ipsos annectere. hie ergo numerus et 
hoc tempus insequitur, quando lacob benedixit, id est : Ru- 


2 sqq. Gf. Genes. 29, 32 - o. 30. 14 sqq. cf. Genes. 33, 1 sqq. 
23 sqq. cf. Genes. 46, 9-25. 


176 

ben, deinde Simeonem cum Leui et ludam et Zabulon t 
Isachar, Dan et Gad, Aser et Neptalim, loseph et Beniamin. 

60 Dein sequitur quinta diuisio de Exodo, cum egrederentur 
filii Israel ex Aegypto. enumerauit enim eos sermo diuinus 
dicens :haec sunt nomina filiorum Israel, 5 
qui ingress! sunt in Aegyptum cum la- 
cob patre suo; unusquisque cum tot a 
domo sua ingressus est: Ruben Simeon 
Leui ludas Isachar Zabulon (deinde Ra- 
chelis :) Beniamin (deinde Ballae :) D a n e t N e p- 10 
t a 1 i m (et Zelphae :) G a d et Aser. loseph autem 
eratinAegypto. 

Q\ Dein post sexta diuisio est numeri iuxta metationem 
castrorum filiorum Israel, sicut scriptum est in libro Nume- 
rorum ex praecepto domini : in prinia metatione ludas Isa- 15 
char Zabulon, in secunda Ruben Simeon Gad, in tertia 
Ephrem et Manasse et Beniamin, in quarta Dan et Aser et 
Neptalim. 

62 Rursus septima numeri diuisio est ex ipso Numerorum 
libro, cum iuxta praeceptum domini declarantur, qui debeant20 
esse principes ad offerenda munera domino, dixitque : d e 
Ruben Elisur filius Sediur, de Simeone 
Salamihel filius Surisaddai, de luda 
Naason filius Aminadab, de Isachar Na- 
thanahel filius Sogar, de Zabulon | Eli a b 25 

p. 761 filius Chelon, de Ephrem Elisama filius 
Eniud, deManasse Gamaliel filius Pha- 
dassur, de Beniamin Abidan filius G e- 
deonis, de tribu Dan Ac hiezer filius 
Ami sad ai, de Aser Phaltihel filius Ech-30 
ram, de Gad Elisaph filius Raguhel, de 
Neptalim Achire filius Enan. 

63 Itemque post hanc sequitur octaua diuisio ex ipso libro 
Numerorum, quando praecepit dominus et misit Moses prinr 
cipes tribuum Israel ad inspiciendam terram repromissionis.35 


2 sqq. Gf. Genes. 49, 1-27. 7-14 Exod. 1, 1-5. 

17 sqq. Of. Num. 2, 2-31. 23-84 Num. 1, 5-15. 

14 postea Fogg. 7 Elisama restituit Gti. secundum LXX et 
Vulg. ; melcham v 


177 

ill 

ait itaque : d e . R u b e n Samufilius Sacchu, de 
Simeone Saphah filius Suri, de luda 
Chaleph filius lephone, de Isachar Sara 
filius loseph, de Ephrem Auses filius 
5 N a u e, de Beniamin Phalti filius R a p h u, 
de Zabulon Gudihel filius Suri, filiorum 
loseph de Manas s e Gel. ad- filius S u d i , 
de Dan Amihel filius Gamali, de AserSa- 
chus filius Michahel, de Neptali Hali f i - 

lOlius Ulaphi, de Gad Gugihel filius Machi. 

Nona quoque diuisio numeri praecepto domini datur ex 64 
ipso libro Numerorum, cum filiis Israel terra sorte distribui- 
tur : d e luda, inquit, Chalep filius lephone 
et deinceps enumerantur principes tribuum de Simeone, 

15 de Beniamin, de Dan, de Manasse, de Ephrem, de Zabulon, 
de Isachar, de Aser, de Neptali. 

Dein rursus decima numeri diuisio est, quando benedixit65 
Moses filiis Israhel, praeponens Ruben et deinceps annec- 
tens : ludas Leui Beniamin loseph Zabulon Isachar Gad 

20 <Dan> | Neptalim et Aser,et in nouissimis iterat" sermonem p. 762 
de loseph :haec suntmilia Ephrem et haec 
milia Manasse. 

Item undecima numeri diuisio probatur, quando praeci-66 
pitur eis, antequam ingrediantur terram Israel, mox trans- 

25 fretantes lordanem stent super duos montes Garizim et Ge- 
bal, sex hinc atque inde, ad benedicendum his, qui custo- 
diunt legem, et ad maledicendum his, qui legis praecepta ser- 
uare contempserint. et est ista contextio numeri : nam super 
benedictiones consecuti sunt Simeon Leui ludas Isachar 

30 loseph et Beniamin : super maledictiones autem hi : Ruben 
Gad Aser Zabulon Dan et Neptalim. 

Duodecima rursus est diuisio numeri,cum sortiuntur terram 67 
possessionis suae et Ruben sorte contingit trans lordanem, 


1-10 Num. 13, 5-16. 12 Num. 34, 19. 17 sqq. Deuteron. 33, 6-25. 

. 1-22 Deuteron. 33, 17. 28 sqq. cf . Deuteron. 27, 12 sqq. 33 sqq. cf. Joshua 

cc. 15-19. 

1 Sacchu Gii. ; acchu V, 19 Gad <Dan> Gti. coll. 

Deuteron. 33, 20 22 et huius epistulae 86 : Dan om. V, <Dan> 
Gad Fogg. 29 benedictiones Fogg.; benedicti his g V 


178 

antequam transiretur in terram Israel, et est ista distributio : 
Ruben et iuxta eum Gad et dimidia tribus Manasse ; dem 
transeuntes lordanem primus ludas accipit, turn Beniamin, 
dein Joseph ex Manasse, dein Simeon inter Beniamin et 
ludam locatus et ut ita dixerim coangustatus est, quia illis 5 
spatia non fuerunt ; dein Zabuon terram consequitur et Isachar 
et Aser et Neptalim et Dan. Leui sane in omnibus dispersus 
est tribubus, ciuitates solummodo et suburbana percipiens. 
68 Rursus tertia decima diuisio numeri occurrit ex Zacharia 
propheta, sicut dicit : in ilia die plangent om-10 
nes tribus terra e, tribus domus David 
super se et mulieres eorum super se, 
tribus domus Nathan super se et mulie- 
res eorum super se, tribus domus Leui 
super se et mulieres eorum super se, 15 
tribus domus Simeon super se et mulie- 
763 res eorum super se, (plangentque cunctae 
residuae tribus; et non nominauit, quae ; nos autem 
propter situm descriptionis terrae hanc con equentiam esse 
perspeximus, ut sit tribus Beniamin, dein Joseph Ruben Gad 20 
Zabulon Isachar Aser Neptalim et Dan. 

69 Item quarta decima diuisio numeri subest ex reuelatiorie 
sancti lohannis, qui dinumerauit ex unaquaque tribu duo- 
decim milia eorum, qui uirginitate sanctificati sunt ; ait enim : 
deluda duodecimo milia, de Ruben similiter, 25 
exin de Gad, de Aser, de Neptali, de Manasse, de Simeone, 
de Leui, de Isachar, de Zabulon, de loseph, de Beniamin. 
nusquam uero in hoc loco meminit Dan. 

70 Forsitan autem et aliis locis numer<i> aliter inueniantur 
adscript! ; nos tamen istos inuenire potuimus et hae quidem 30 
sunt diuisiones, quae secundum numerum diuerso modo con- 
st at esse compositae, nunc quidem secundum praeceptum 
domini, nunc autem iuxta singulorum principum uoluntatem, 
dico uero Mosis et Hiesu Naue et qui deinceps eorum succes- 


10-18 Zach. 12, 12-14. 22 sqq. Apocal. 7, 5-8. 

12 et 14 eorum Gil. ; earum V Fogg. 15 et 17 eorum V ; ea- 

rum Fogg. 19 sq. nominauit ; queis ( 1) nos Fogg. 31 nume- 

raliter V, corr. Fogg, 34 mosi V, correxit Gii. naue V 


__ 179 

sores existere merueruiit. nee sine spiritu id actum est sed, 
litvoluit, idem spiritus sanctus enumerauit atque disposuit 
singulas consequentias iuxta propriam uoluntatem. reuertens 71 
item de his uno loco breuiter et consequenter edisseram eas- 
5 demque quattuordecim diuisiones harumque selectiones : non 
in uacuum faciam nee ut uenerationi tuae haec recensenti 
molestus existam, sed ut noueris (quod iam dei sit adiuuare), 
ut unicuique tribui memoratos lapides ueraciter coaptare 
possimus. 

10 Excogitante igitur multum mente, tractantes iuxta experi-72 
entiam huius electionis, suggerit nobis animus et ipsa conse- 
quentia lectionis, qualiter animaduerti possit quadratus ordo 
rationalis ex appositis lapidibus secundum memorata uoca- 
bula. requiratur iam de singulis numeris, sicuti discretaest | P- 764 

15 unaquaeque diuisio, qualis ad eorundem lapidum rationem 
lectionemque sit congruens. et ubicumque quidem dinumera-73 
tarum tribuum statum in locis singulis inspeximus menteque 
perpendimus non posse naturaliter ut numerus quilibet 
eorum, qui in unaquaque diuisione numerati sunt, unum 

20 nomen minus habens ex tribubus appellation! horum lapi- 
dum coaptari, ideoque protinus diuisionem secundam rite 
sustulimus, utpote quae horum lapidum consonantiam habere 
non possit, propter quod primes ponat Dan et Neptalim, 
Gad et Aser, hoc est ancillarum filios, quando mittens lacob 

25 Esau munera in turmam eos primam diuisit, post haec autem 
filios Liae fecit aliam turmam, dein filios Rachel turmam 
tertiam. nam cum pretiosiores lapides sint in principio 
rationalis, porro filii ancillarum inferiores habeantur et hie 
primum positi sint, impossibile est eos ad causam rationalis 

30 in hac numeri parte congruere, propter quod ita se habere 
non possit. 

Item quartam diuisionem, benedictionem lacob, exploraui- 74 
mus, quando moriens filiis benedixit. habet enim primum 
Ruben, dein Simeon et Leui simul adiunctos, ita ut ista utrius- 
que copulatio horum lapidum congruentiae uideatur obsistere. 
ideoque istam quoque sustulimus, cum lapidibus istis adcom- 
modari minime possit. 


2 idem Fogg t 19 in om. Fogg. 23 propter ea quia Fogg. 


180 - 

75 Inspeximus autem et quintam diuisionem, quae continet 
initium egressionis filiorum Israhel ex Aegypto, et inuenimus 
earn praeponentem liberarum filios et ancillarum iuxta com- 
positionis ordinem supponentem facientemque nouissimos 
<primos> primosque nouissimos," et ob hoc, quod loseph in 5 
Aegypto constitutus postremus nominatus est, animaduerti- 
mus iterum non posse lapides istos memoratarum tribuum 

76 coaptari nominibus : et quod naturaliter onychinus lapis in 
p. 765 persona loseph | interpretari non possit neque rursus extre- 

mus loseph iuxta compositionem rationalis inseri debeat, 10 
nisi quod tantummodo necessitate praeposteratus sit, ut, 
cum undecimus habeatur, hie numeretur duodecimus iuxta 
cogentem necessitatem compositionis huius numeri, quam 

77repperimus ordinatam. in Graeca quippe locutione quae ex 
Hebraea translata est, onychinum lapidem duodecimum in- 15 
uenimus positum atque nouissimum, ita ut Beniamin contem- 
plationem sui modis omnibus adtrahat ; undecimum uero 
inuenimus beryllum, quern et undecimo loseph tarn iuxta 
numerum quam iuxta contemplationem consequenter aptaui- 

78mus. inspicientes etiam Hebraicam Exodum in qua et lex 20 
probatur adscripta legentesque de rationali hoc, in quo clusi 
erant isti lapides, inuenimus onychinum lapidem aliter ordina- 
> turn : undecimus positus erat et beryllus duodecimus atque 
postremus. unde propemodum nobis ambiguitas orta est 
impedimentum intellegentiae faciens ueluti fictam contem-25 
plationem nos in duobus istis, berylli dico et onychini, lapi- 
dibus attulisse, dicebamque, quomodo in supplicationibus et 
oratione continua poterat error oboriri, et intellexi, quod dis- 
pensante deo hoc ita peractum est, ut idem loseph undecimus 
inter fratres suos existens duodecimus inueniretur iuxta com- 30 
positionem huius numeri, qui eum duodecimum esse declara- 
uit, cum diceret : loseph autem erat in Aegyp- 

79 to. scientes itaque dispensatione diuina propter ueritatis 


1 continent. V corr. Fogg. 3 sq. liberarum... supponentem 

in textu omissa in margine inferiore suppleuil V man.l. 5 primos 
insemii Gu. ; primosque nouissimos om. Fogg. 14 reperimus Fogg. 
19 <in> contemplationem Fogg. optauimus V, corr. Fogg. 

22 inueniemus V, correxit Gu. lapidum V, corr. Fogg. 23 et om. 
Fogg. 2 ' attulisset Fogg. fort, discebamque 28 continuaV 


-1 Q1 

* XO J. 

contemplationes berylli lapidi, .quae in ipsum loseph explen- 
tur, coaptari, sic est disposition, ut beryllus lapis duodecimus 
poneretur et ultimus. nam et loseph, cum inter fratres unde- 
cimus esse memoratur, in hac tamen compositione numeri 
Segressionis filiorum Israel duodecimus et extremus adscri- 
bitur. itaque prorsus inlustratione diuina et dispensatione | p. 766 
bene admodum relatus est onychinus lapis in Beniamih, qui 
in hac dispositione ante loseph numeratus est, beryllus 
autem in loseph accommodatus ob contemplationes eidem 

10 consonantes, quamuis ultimus lapis ipse numeretur, quia sic 
accidit et loseph nouissimum scribi, sicut frequenter asserui. 

Transgredientes igitur et hanc diuisionem respeximusSO 
dispositionem sextam iuxta di<nu>meratarum tribuum 
consequentiam et inuenimus iuxta metationem castrorum 

15 Israel quadrati agminis ordinem magis oportere congrue<re> 
rationali iuxta ternas et ternas tribus, sicut in eodem ratio- 
nali fas erat cernere, quod quadrati ordinis probatur exstare, 
et erat hoc planissimum atque symbolicum, id est signifi- 
catiuum, propter dispositiones ordinum consonantiamque 

20 castrorum. sed in his separata tribus, tribus Leui, nobis ob-^Sl 
stitit. constitutus est enim ludas habens secum Isachar et 
Zabulon in uno metationis contubernio, et constitutus est 
primus ad orientalem plagam propter significantiam, ut 
aestimo, regiae potestatis et quod Ruben a propria reciderit 

25 gloria, quia stratum maculauerit patris, sicuti diuinis litteris 
probatur insertum. in secunda uero metatione castrorum Ru- 82 
ben ordinatur cum Simeone et Gad uersus ad mare, ad occi- 
dentem quoque Ephrem cum Manasse et Beniamin, qui omnes 
ex Rachel in una ponuntur metatione castrorum ; propter 

SOManassen uero Leui uidetur exclusus. dein ad aquilonem 
quartam metationem primitus Dan continet, dein Aser, 
deinde Neptalim, et quoniam Leui non inuenimus inter eos 
ammixtum, cognouimus Tnec istam posse descriptionem com- 


1-2 Exod. 1, 5. 27-28 Genes. 49, 4 (35, 22). 

> > 

1 lapidisF, correxit Gii. 7 esset Fogg. 13 dimeratarum V, 
corr. Fogg. 15 congrue corr. Fogg. 16 sicut Fogg, 
32 neptalin V quoniam V; cum Fogg. 


- 182 

position! lapidum commodari, ne uideatur ei f iliorum Israel 
unum <de>esse uocabulum. 

83 Quapropter et hanc omittentes intendimus diuisioni sep- x 
timae. quam protinus ademimus, quia non earn repperimus 

p. 767 composiltioni lapidum congruentem. haec enim iuxta priri- 5 
cipes tribuum ad praeceptum domini constat esse numerata : 
in qua primus ordinatus est Ruben, dein <Simeon, deinde 
luda, dein> Isachar et qui secuntur ; loseph autem secundo 
numeratus est, propter quod Ephrem in uno numero, Manas- 
ses in altero sit locatus, et quoniam Leui rursus exemptus est 10 
nequiuimus numerum coaptare lapidibus propter immutatio- 
nem Leui et propter adiectionem unius tribus, quae in duabus 
probatur esse diuisa. 

84 Dein octauam diuisionem de libro Numerorum diligenter 

inspeximus, ubi praecepit deus et misit Moses principes tri-15 
buum Israhel ad inspiciendam terram promissionis, et nee 
istam repperimus ad compositionem memoratorum lapidum 
consonantem, propter quod et Ruben in primis numeratus 
est, dein Simeon, deinde ludas, exin Isachar et deinceps qui 
secuntur et nusquam Leui mentio facta est. 20 

85 Transeuntes igitur ad nonam diuisionem et ipsam conspexi- 
mus, quae facta est ex praecepto domini, sicut in libro conti- 
netur Numerorum, quando missi sunt principes tribuum, ut 
sorte diuiderent terram promissionis filiis Israel, et nee istam 
similiter ad consequentiam lapidum coaptare ualuimus. 25 
inuenientes enim ludam <in> primis positum, dein Simeonem 
et postea Beniamin, Dan quoque et Manassen 'nee non et 
Ephrem et Zabulon et deinceps Isachar, exin Aser et nouissi- 
me Neptalim, et rursus tribum Leui reperientes omissam et 

86 Joseph dupliciter enumeratum in Ephrem et Manassem, hanc 30 
etiam praetermisimus et in decimam diuisionem iritentionem 
mentis ammouimus nee ipsam quiuimus inuenire lapidibus 
consonantem .; etenim quando benedixit Moses filiis Israhel 


1 accoramodari Fogg. 2 deesse Fogg. ; esse V 4 respeximus 
Fogg.. 7 Simeon dein de luda dein inseruit ., cf. 62 10 quo- 
niam y ; cum Fogg. 22 continet V, corr. Fogg. 26 <in> 
primis Gii. (cf. supra, p. 767, 14) ; primis V, primum Fogg 
30 loseph Fogg. ; in ioseph V 32 ammonuimus V, corr. Fogg. 
33 etenira Fogg. ; est enim y. 


183 
praeponens Beniamin quartum post Leui, dein loseph, et 

'U'lTI 

quoniam Simeonis | nullam intulit mentionem, impossible P 
fuit earn coaptare lapidibus. habet autem ita : Ruben ludas 
Leui Beniamin, dein loseph Zabulon et Isachar, deinde Gad, 
5qui est ancillae secundae filius, praepostere positus, dein 
Dan et Neptalim, dein Aser omnium nouissimus, qui et ipse 
secundae ancillae filius inuenitur. hie etiam quia numerus 
imminutus est Simeone praetermisso, fas non erat diuisionem 
istam lapidibus rationalis posse congruere. 

10 THE ELEVENTH ENUMERATION 

of the number and the division of the sons of Israel, how p . 88 
Moses commanded the twelve tribes to stand, six on the mount 
of Gerizim (Garizin) and six on the mount of Ebal (Gebal), 
as it is written in Deuteronomy, and the division of the tri- 

15bes is thus : 

Thus he saith : <t Let six stand on the mount of Gerizim 
which are these who speak the blessings ; there spake them 
Symeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, Joseph, Benjamin, and on 
the mount of Ebal, who spake the curse, Reuben, Gad, 

20 Asher, Zebulon, Dan, Naphtali. He did not mention them in 
order for writing them down on the ordered stones which 
were on the oracular plate. 

But let us now recall to mind the eleventh enumeration of 
the numbers, which was divided into two parts, six on this 


16-20 cf. Deut. 27. 12 ff 

A (10 ff.) L 

1 proponens Fogg. 2 quoniam V ; cum Fogg, ullam V, corr. Fogg. 

10 The eleventh enumeration] L Rursus et hanc praetermittentes 
in undecimam sollicita prorsus intentions peruenimus et repperimus 

11 of the number ...Israel]> L after 12 stand+L ad benedi- 
cendum et maledicendum 14 is written] L probatur adscriptum 
16 let six stand] L stabunt 17 which ...blessings] L ad bene- 
dicendum et maledicendum 18 after Joseph + et L 19 who 
...the curse] L ad maledicendum 20 after Naphtali + L ex- 
ceptis quippe Ruben et Neptalim liberarum filii probantur hie esse 
praelati He did ...18 plate] L cumque et ista diuisio uidetur in- 
consequen s ad quadratum rationalis ordinem : after this + L 
non videtur ea adsumenda. 23 recall to mind] L soflicite con- 
tuentes before eleventh +Leandem 24 was divided] L uidere- 
tur esse discreta 24 this ...1 set down] L hanc arbitrati 


184 

mountain and six on that ; this we find set down on the two 
emerald gems, on the shoulders the names of the sons of 
Israel were inscribed ; all twelve names could not be inscri- 
bed on one emerald, but they were divided and inscribed, six 
on one and six on the other six of them as a blessing on 5 
Gerizim upon the stone which was on the right shoulder, 
and six tribes were inscribed for a curse on Ebal upon the 
stone which was on the left shoulder. 

These mountains are over against Jericho on the eastern 
side near to Galgal. 10 

This the Scriptures tell us, where the children of Israel were 
blessed, and they were on the mount of Gerizim who spake 
p. 89 the blessings : Symeon, Levi, Judah and the other three spake 
along with them thus : Blessed is he who shall do the will 
of God, and the sound (lit. voice) of the cry was heard in 15 
the fields where the people stood and they said : So be it ! 
So be it ! And again Reuben, Gad, <Asher> and Zebulon, 
Dan and Naphtali were on mount Ebal and spake thus : 


1-3 Exod. 28. 9 11 of. Deut. 27. 14 ff. 

AL 

sumus congruere numeris compositionis lapidum smaragdi, qui 
catenulis nectebantur : thereafter + L auro et hyacinthina uitta 
conserti 2 the names ...were inscribed] ita ut in his duobus 
smaragdis ins crib erentur nomina filiorum Israel 3 all ...4 one 
emerald] L eo quod unus smaragdus ob rotunditatem sui duodecim 
nomina capere non potest 4 but they were ...7 left shoulder] 
L oportebat autem, et si capere poterat, dextros sinistrosque distin- 
gui, et ideo in utroque lapide, posito in dextera scilicet et sinistra, 
conscripta sunt nomina sicut in utroque monte Garizin et Gebal 
tribus filiorum Israhel ordinatae sunt 9 are over against] 
L ex aduerso sibi cernuntur oppositi Jericho] L ubi iericho 

sita est 10 near to] L ultra locum Galgal] L Gilgal 11 This 
...12 blessed] L ibique referuntur benedixisse Israhel 12 and> 
L were ...spake] L consistebant dicentes 13 Symeon 

...thus> L 14 shall do] L facit 15 God] L domini of the 
cry> L 16 in the fields]L per plana camporum and they 
said] L innuebantur ei, ut diceret 17 and again] L e contra 
uero <Asher> ...18 Naphtali] L et reliqui cum eis 18 

were] L stantes thus > L 


185 

Cursed be everyone who shall not do that written in these 
books of the law . And the whole people say : So be it ! 
So be it ! , and being translated 'amen' is 'so be it'. For the 
voice from these two mountains and the cry of these two com- 
5 panics was heard by the people who stood in the field between 
the two mountains ; and in translation the mount of Gerizim 
is called the 'mount of salvation' ,and mount Ebal the'defi- 
led and befouled'. 

But certain people there are who think thus, who have 

10 not read through the divine books with understanding, more 
especially the tribe of the Samaritans,say that mount Geri- 
zim is elsewhere the lofty mount whereon is Sikimay, which 
is Syk'em, that is over against Syk'em, the city of the Sa- 
maritans, into which the Lord entered, find from which came 

15 the woman of Samaria and beheld the Lord Who sat at the 
well. Sichem (Syk'em) is now called Neapolis, a prosperous 
(lit. fat) and populous (lit. full) city which is in the land of 
the Palestinians, which Samaritans and Jews inhabited at 
that time, and it is called Samaritan. For the mountain 

20 which is near to this city is called the mount of Someray, 
and he had a son and he called his name Somoron ; the 
name of the mountain, too, is called Sonier. 
Because of this the name was given to the tribe of the 


AL 

1 in these books of the law] L in isto libro 2 say] L respondit 
amen- so b e it] L in inverted order 4 voice] L uoces and 

he cry ...6 two moun tains > L 6 and> L 7 salvation] 

L liberatus : thereafter + L et concisio incolatus eorum and 

Mount Ebal ...8 befouled> L 9 thus> L 10 with under- 
standing] L diligenter 11 say that ...12 elsewhere] L ne forte 
Garizin mons sit 12 the lofty mount> L -whereon] L quae 
adiacet Sikim ...18 Samaritans] L Sicimis,quae Sicima et Si- 
chem dicitur, habens ex adverso Sichar urbem Samarit<an> 
orum 15 beheld] L inuenit 16 Sichem] L Sicima pros- 
perous ...populous] L opulentissima 17 which is ...19 Sama- 
ritan] L tuncautem Samaria dicebatur et ludaea : Samaria autem 
20 which is near to] L naturaliter Someray] L cuiusdam So- 
mer 21 and(?) they called his name> L 22 Somer] L Somor 
23 the name was given] L nominis huius appellatio consecuta 
est the tribe of the Samaritans] L maxime uero roborata 


186 

Samaritans, and the tribe of the Samaritans were from the 
land of the Babylonians and of the Assyrians ; they were 
brought in by Nebuchadnezzar and settled in the land of 
the Galilaeans and of the Palestinians, when Nebuchadnez- 
zar led the sons of Israel.into captivity. 5 

The elders of the sons of Israel came in unto Nebuchadnez- 
zar, and the men who came before Nebuchadnezzar were 
Ezra and others of the priests and the elders of the sons of 
Israel. They besought Nebuchadnezzar to send men to 
guard their land, that it .might not be turned into/ an oak- 10 
grove and be destroyed. 

Nebuchadnezzar heard their petition and chose his ser- 
vants from four tribes. He sent them to protect the land 
and the names of the tribes were these : Kudians and Kyt'- 
ians and Sep'uans and Anagonians, who went to settle in 15 
the land of Israel. Each of these tribes had their idols to whom 
they bowed down and whom they addressed as a god. They 
came and were established near to the mount of Someray 


3 ff. 2 Kings 17. 24 H. 

AL 

per aduentum eorum 1 and the tribe ...5 Palestinians] 

L quos ad colendum terras illas rex Assyrius destinauit 4 when 
Nebuchadnezzar ...5 captivity] L quando captivitas acci- 

dit ludaeorum 6 the elders ...Israel] L seniores Israel 

came in unto] L conuenerunt before seniores 7 and the men 
...Nebuchadnezzar] L qui erant tune in Babylone were] L cum 
9 Ezra] L Hesdra and others ...priests] L sacerdote : 

thereafter -)- L et qui uocabantur consiliarii of the priests 

and> L 9 Nebuchadnezzar] L rex Assyriorum et passim 

men to guard] L habitatores 10 their land] L in ludaeam 

that it might ...11 be destroyed] L ne terra luxurians 

sine cultore deficeret 12 Nebuchadnezzar] L qui heard 

their petition] L suscipiens eorum salubre consilium and chose 
his servants from> L 13 to protect] L ad inhabitandum 

14 and the names ...were these] L id est 15 Sepuans 
and Anagonians] L Seppharaeos et Anagogauaeos who ...17' Is- 
rael] L qui ascendentes 16 each of ...17 a god] L idola 
sua secum,quae tune unaquaeque gens apud se coluerat, adtulerunt 
17 before they + L cum 18 near to ...Someray] L in terra 
Israel 


187 

and they were called from the name of the mountain and their 

, own deeds Samaritans. 

For in the guardianship Somer is called enemy (?),for these 
were the guardians of the land, and at that time upon those 
5 guardians of Samaria lions and panthers and bears had increas-p. 91 
ed and raged against them. To such an extent had the wild 
beasts increased that they consumed the tribes of Samaria 
from day to day. These sent off to Nebuchadnezzar the king 
to complain that he might take them away from the land 

10 of the Galileans, and that they might be returned at once 
(or, back again) to their own land, lest the whole tribe should 
be destroyed by the multitude of wild beasts. Nebuchadnez- 
zar was astonished and said : How, then,have the tribes of 
Israel dwelt there ? 

15 He summoned to him the elders of the sons of Israel and 
inquired : How is it possible to dwell in this land ? They 
gave a true and correct response, saying to Nebuchadnez- 
zar : No one of the tribes can dwell there if haply some one 
hath not the law of the Lord and if he walk not in accordance 

20 with the law and serve the Lord God. ' 


AL 

1 from the name ...deeds> L 3 for in ...enemy] 

L propter quod Samaritanus 'custos* interpretatur after 4 land 
+ L Israel at that time] L postea uero 4-5 Those guar- 
dians of Samaria] L eos 5-6 had increased] L consurgen- 
tes in eos 6 and raged against them] L corrumpebant 

multitudinem 7 had iriereased> L that they consu- 

med] L absumerentur ab eis the tribes of Samaria > L 

8 day to day -f- L with what follows : thereafter + L pro qua re 
legati per dies singulos ab incolis et habitatoribus 9 to com- 

plain> L that he might ...11 own land] L quatenus eis de 
locis ipsis licentiam discedendi tribueret 11 lest ...12 beasts] 
L propter huiusmodi saeuitiam bestiarum 12 Nebuchadnezzar 
>L 13 and said> L the tribes of> L 15 He] L his autem 
compertis Assyriorum rex of the sons of Israel] L ludaeorum 

16 to dwell in this land] L in loco quas dudum di <re> xerat, im- 
morari 17 and correct] L sine mora response] L consilium 
to Nebuchadnezzar> L 18 dwell] L residui 19 hath] 

'L custodiat 19 Lord] L domini dei and if ... 20 Lord God> L 


18$ 

Nebuchadnezzar demanded the law of the elders and they 
wrote it out in accordance with their law and gave it to 
him ; and Nebuchadnezzar commanded the Samaritans to be 
guided by the law through Ezra the priest. This is not the 
Ezra who is the son of Salathiel, the son of Zorobabel, but 5 
another called by this name (?), and this Ezra had been a 
priest in the land of Israel. 

He gave to the Samaritans only the first five books (lit. 
heads) of the Old Testament (lit. Genesis), written in the first 
script in accordance with the form which the Lord gave on 10 
the mount of Sinai, and the form of this script the sons of the 
Hebrews call diesinon, which being interpreted is' laid down 
on (or, set in) the tablets'. The form of script, however, which 
the Hebrews now have is not like to the former one which 
was written on the tablets, but to the one which the Jews 15 
now have they give the name somoronos. The Samaritans, 
p. -02 however, call desinon what was written at that time on the 
graven tablets. 

Ezra the priest set forth from Babylon. He wished to se- 
parate the tribe of the Israelites from the Samaritans, lest 20 
the Samaritans should become mixed with the race of Abra- 


AL 

1 Nebuchadnezzar] L qui and they ...2 their law] 

L ei protinus obtulerunt 2 and gave it to him] L ipse uero 
reddens exemplaria legis authentica penes se detinuit 3 and 
Nebuchadnezzar ...4 priest] L quae direxit incolis et habitato- 
ribus terrae Cudaeis et Cuthaeis ac reliquis cum Hesdra sacerdote 
is] L uocabatur 5 but another called by this name(?)] 

L qui Zorobabel erat filius lechoniae 6 had been ...Israel] L 

quern diximus : thereafter -f L ascendens Hierosolymam 8 Sa- 
maritans] L eis only the first ...9 Testament] L pentateu- 
chum tantumraodo, id est quinque libros Moysi 11 and the 
L quam the sons of> L 12 diesinon] L deessinon 

laid down ...13 the tablets] L insculptum 14 the form of script] 
L elementa litterarum \ 6 have] L titantur after 15 tablets -j- 
L lapideis 16 somoronos] L somahirenus 17 call] L seruant 
after time -f L ut diximus 19 set forth] L ascendens 20 from 
the Samaritans 21... Abraham] L uolens discernere Israhel 
a reliquis gentibus, ut genus Abrahae non uideretur esse permix- 
tum cum habitatoribus terrae 


ham. For the law of Moses he took, but he did not keep the 
writings of the prophetic books in the 'desinon, but only 
those of Genesis (i. e., the Pentateuch), which the Samaritans 
received the natural law, in order that thereby a division 
5 might be induced between the race of Abraham and the race 
of the Samaritans. 

Now I shall expatiate and dwell upon the account of all 
this and shall investigate whence are the Samaritans or 
from what tribes. Since they are called by the name of their 

10 mountain and that of the son of Someray, who was of the 
tribe of the Ganaanites and of the Pherezites ,or howsometimes 
the name of the Samaritans is translated as 'guardian', for 
they were the guardians of the land ; I shall begin to dicuss 
this in another manner, and shall show clearly how they 

15 were the guardians of the law and worshipped idols. Thus 
is it written concerning the Samaritans, that they practised ' jr. 93 
and were taught and had the law of the Lord God and bowed 
down to their own idols. 


AL 

1 the law ... he took[ L qui (habitatores) tenent quidem 
legem 2 writings of the prophetic books] L prophetas in the 
desinon ;..4 the natural law] L quod ea forma a Samarita- 
nis praeoccupata iam fuerat 6 Samaritans] L .a nationibus 

reliquis 7 now I shall... what tribes] L sed nos his pe- 

ruenientes in locis coacti sumus ob occasionem causae huius am- 
pliare sermonem 9 since they are called L] Erant itaque, qui 
permanserunt ex gentibus in terra Israhel pro diversis rebus Sa- 
maritani uocati by the name ... Pherezites] L primum a 

Somer uno ex filiis Chananaeorum et Pherezaeorum : thereafter 
+ L priusquam Abraham patriarcha ad eandem terram diuinitatis 
adueniret, et appellabatur Somer et So moron, tarn mons quam om 
nia, quae mentis uicina esse uidebantur 11 or how sometimes 
...12 'guardian,'] L rursus praefatae gen <te> s ab'Assyriorum 
rege transmissae uocatae sunt Samaritani 12-13 for they ...14 
another manner] L habet autem et aliam contemplationem no- 
minis huius intentio, propter custodiam uidelicet legis 14 and 
shall ...15 worshipped idols] L quoniam qui inmissi fuerant, le-. 
gis putabatur custodire mandata thus is it written] L dicit 

enim scriptura 16 Samaritans] L ipsis they practised ... 
17 Lord God] L manserunt facientes legem dei 


190 

It is said, however, in the law of the Lord : Bow thou not 
down to idols, and if any one shall bow down before idols, he 
shall be considered an infringer (Zi/.fulfiller) of the law. These 
four guilty tribes of the Samaritans, however, had recourse to 
deceit, when they heard that Ezra was (ZiUs) come to destroy 5 
and to demolish their idols, as is written in the law of Moses, 
for the Lord commanded that all who bowed down to idols 
should be stoned. When the tribe of the Samaritans heard 
this, they hastened and removed the idols from the high 
place of the altars of the temple and removed and hid their 10 
idols on mount Gerizim, as it is said in its place in the ac- 
counts : The men of Babylon worship their idols Sak'ot'i 
and Benet'i ; the men of K'ot', their idols which are called 
Nerigel, the men of Emat'a, their idols Asima<t'> and the 
<E> veans, Nebas and T'art'ak' and their idols Sep'aruim . 15 

The hearts of the Samaritans were led by this error to 
bow down to mount Gerizim, where they concealed and hid 
their idols, and from every side, wheresoever they be, they 
bow down to their idols. From the north, from the south, 


1-3 cf. Oeut. 5. 8-9 52 Kings 17 .41 12-15 2 Kings 17. 30 ff. 

AL 

1 It is said ... 3 the law] L cum uero lex idola nullatenus 
adoranda praecipiat quomodo lex ab eis poterat custodiri ? Thereaf- 
ter + L uerumtamen ista causa hinc insinuat intellegentiae mo- 
dum 3-4 these four guilty tribes] L profanissimi sacerdotes 
memoratarum quattuor gentium 4 had recourse to deceit> 
L when they heard] L scientes before profanissimi 5 was 
come] L missus aduenerit to destroy ...6 idols] L qui abo- 
minabatur idola iuxta diuina praecepta 6 of Moses > L 8 when 
the tribe ...heard this> L 9 from the high ...10 temple] 
L e suis excelsis culminibus 10 and removed > L 

after 11 Gerizim + L in loco nimis abdito et secreto as it ... 
accounts] L sicuti Iiabet antiqua traditio 12 idols] L deam 

13 and> L Benet'i] L Benith which are called > L 

15 T'art'ak'] L Tharchar after 16 error + L docentes 

17 where they ... idols > L before 18 and -j- L 

quapropter 18 they bow ...19 idols] L ad montem se conuer- 
tentes orant 19 from the north ...180.2 Gerizim] L qui in 
oriente sunt, ad Occident em respiciunt et, qui sunt in occidente, ad 
orientem et, qui in aquilone, similiter intendunt ad meridiem et, 
qui in meridie, ad aquilouem moutis aspiciunt 


191 

from every side, wheresoever they be,the'y bow down to their 
idols, for these were on Gerizim, in order that the word of 
the Scripture might be fulfilled, which saith : The Samaritans 
stood and awaited the law of the Lord, but bowed themsel-p. 94 
5 ves down to their own idols . But those who are now Sama- 
ritans know not where their idols are hid ; they say : Our 
fathers bowed down to this mountain , and relate that they 
are the offspring of Joseph. 

And all this was that the word of the Divine Scriptures 
. 10 might not be ridiculous, more especially because in accordance 
with their works the divine books speak regarding the 
observance of the law and the bowing down to their idols. 
This whole account was concerning the twelve tribes, 
which were divided on the mount of Gerizim and that of 
15 Ebal, and we shall show that this is <not> Gerizim which 
the Samaritans bow down to, but that they have fallen into er- 
ror, for they know not all the divine books, but are cognizant 
merely of the Pentateuch (lit. Genesis), nor do they read the 
other books. 

20 They think that the mountain which is near to Neapolis 
is it, for the mount of Gerizim is great and high, and there 
is a mountain which is over against it, which they erroneously 
say to be Ebal, for Sichem and the place in which Joseph 


3-5 2 Kings 17.41 6-7 Jo. 4. 20 7-8 cf. Jo. 4-5 

AL 

2 the word of> L 3 the Samaritans > L 4 stood and 
awaited] L manserunt facientes 5 But those ...6 hid] L 

n am licet ipsi, qui adorant, ignorent occulta in abdito mentis idol a 
they say ... 8 Joseph> L 9 And all this ... 10 ridicu- 

lous] L impossibile tamen est, ut diuina scriptura iuxta rei huius 
sententiam mentiatur 13 This whole account was] L oblata 
uero nobis est huius expositionis occasio 14 were divided] L 
ordinatae sunt : thereafter + L sicuti habet ipsa numeri ordinati 
discretio 15 and we shall show ...16 how down to> L 
17 for they know not ... 19 other hooks] L qui Deuteronomium 
non intelligenter aduertunt, ut aliani scripturam sibimet facerent 
after 20 Neapolis + L sicut supra retulimus 21 for> L 

is great and high] L qui nimis altus est is]Llocatus 

est 22 erroneously say] L suspicantur after 23 Ebal + L 
et ipse uehementer excelsus est 23 Sichem] L Sicima and 
the place 181 ! 1 laid> L 


192 

/ 

was laid are between the two mountains in the midst of the 
valley, and from this side and that are the mountains. 
One Slope of the mountain of Gerizim is cut into steps up 
to the very top of the mountain of the Samaritans, who 
dwelt in the city of Neapolis. On the summit of the mountain 5 
they have erected (J#.rnade)a building and bow down to mount 
95 Gerizim, as we have said before, because of their error and 
not because of their wisdom, for they have falsified the Scrip- 
tures and all the accounts which are true. The summit of 
this mountain is lofty and should any one give a shout on 10. 
the top of the mountain, it is not possible for the sound 
(lit. voice) to be heard in the valley down below. When the six 
chiefs called out and spake the blessings to the people, who 
did not hear the sound because of the height of the mountain, 
they could not have said 'amen', which being interpreted is 15 
'so be it'. 

For its height is a mile and more ; there are many steps 
right up to the summit, as they say, fifteen hundred and over, 
and below at the base of the mountain is a place where there 
are no steps, and because of this great elevation it is impossi- 20 
ble tnat those who stood at the base (lit. root )of the mountain 
could hear the voice of those at the top, or that those above 
could hear the voice of those standing below. By all this 


12-16 cf. Deut. 27. 12 ff 
AL 

1 are] L sita est 2 and from ... mountains] L hinc 
inde montium obiectione conclusa 3 one slope ...5 Nea- 
polis] L fecerunt autem Samaritan!, qui in ciuitate ipsa comma- 
nent, gradus in monte 6 buildings] L templum quoddam 

and bow down ...8 wisdom] L quern Garizin ipsi uocant iux- 
ta quondam obliuiqnis incuriam, non iuxta fidei rationisque ueri- 
tatem for they ...9 are true] L nam liber aliter habet histo- 
riae, sed hi falluntur, qui id quod est non diligenter inspiciunt 
The summit of the mountain] L denique montes isti adeo sub- 
limes et altissimi comprobantur 12 When the six ...16 'so be 
it'] L quomodo ergo principes tribuum, qui sursum erant, sex ho- 
mines de tanta sublimitate uocem suampopulis auditam f acere po- 
terant, et qui deorsum stabant responderent a m e n ? 17 height 
is] L eminet altitude mentis 18 right up to the summit 

> L 19 and below ...20nosteps> L 20 great elevation > 
L 23 By all this ...193.1 disproved] L protinus arguuntur 


. . 

the error of the Samaritans is disproved, for these are not 
the mountains on which the sons of Israel spake the blessings 
and the curses. 

Now the books(sic)of Joshua the son of Nun show us, which 
5 are written in order after the books of the Pentateuch (lit.' 
Genesis), that on the eastern side over against Jericho there Dj. p. e 
stand the two mountains, Ebal and Gerizim, near to the 
place which they call Galgala (sic), where they set up the 
twelve stones; where, too, Joshua the son of Nun held the 

lOpassover and they ate the bread when the manna gave out 
on them. In this place the sons of Israel circumcised themsel^P-' ^ 6 
.ves with a knife of obsidian stone. This spot is Galgal, 
which lies to the east of Jericho. Near it are located the moun- 
tains, which are little hills Gerizim and Ebal, on which they 

15 spake the blessings and the curses, for the great mount of 
Gerizim, that is, Sikimay, lies to the south of Jericho, nearer 
to the eastern side (i. e., southeast), and is fifty-two miles 
away from Jericho. These, however, are the mountains, E- 
bal and Gerizim, near to Jericho, at a distance of about two 

20 miles to the east, tending to the southern side. 

Now have we explained about these mountains in allDj. p. 8 
truth : let this be sufficient for the relation and understan- 
ding of all this. 


6-9 Joshua 4. 20 9-11 Joshua 5. 10-12 11-12. Joshua 5, 3 12-13 cf. Joshua 4. 19 
AL (1-18) \ ' . . 

2 on which ...3 the curses] L quos scriptura diuina significat 
5 in order] L cbnsequentia libri lesu Naue manifestat after ... 
Pentateuch> L 6 that] L quando 7 Ebal and Gerizim 
> L 7 near ...8 Galgala] in L joined to 11 This spot is Galgal 
9 where they ...12 obsidian stone> L 12 This spot is Gal- 
gal ...13 Jericho] L oriental's autem plaga Hiericho sita est iuxta 
Galgal, qui est locus Galgalae 13 Near it ...15 the curses> L 
15 for the ...16 that is> L 16 Sikimay ...17 eastern side] L 
Sicima uero ad partem est aquilonis Hiericho, in occidentem tier- 
gens 18 from Jericho] L here breaks off in the ms. 

6 that] Djanashvili's text again begins. 


THE ARMENIAN FRAGMENT^ 

AND EPITOMES OF 

EPIPHANIUS ON THE 

TWELVE STONES 


46 i/na.nju 


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nt-ffrbuiii 15 jp-uitfiui'Uuig] uiuiuuAi lulfiuligli '. 14 HIS. 

lectio ms. arm. hier. 1217 : his. qut.pufi 15 ms. 

yen- ed. kpui'iig. 16 ms. 


. 197 

THE EPITOMES PUBLISHED BY L, ALISHAN. 

A Sermon of St. Epiphanius concerning the Names 
of the precious Stones 


Epitome A. 

The first stone sardion, tpa- 
zion, zmrukht, kayc (carbun- 
cle), shap'iuya, yaspis, ya- 
kund, akat, aiiieyt'iustron, os- 
keyk'ar (chrysolith), biurey, 
eyunkn (onyx) : Rubeyn, 
Shmavon/ .Tewi, Yuda, Nep'- 
t'ayim, Gat', Aser, Isak'ar, 
Zaboypn, Yovseyp, Beniamin, 
Dan. 

The sardion is ruddy, like 
blood. It is found in Babejon 
near to Assyria (Asoris). It 
has the power of healing, 
swellings and wounds. It is 
a transparent stone (1). 


The topaz is scarlet. It is 
found in the city of -Tupazey 
in India. Its power is this, 
that when one cleans it on the 
leeches' whetstone, it gives 
forth .water like to milk and he 
who drinks of this is healed 
in his eyes and of fever. 


Epitome B. 


The first gem is the sardion, 
which is reddish in appearance, 
like to blood, resembling a 
slice of dried fish. It is also 
of avail .against tumors and 
wounds which are cut with the 
sword. 


The second gem is the tpa- 
zion, like to the .gem carbun- 
cle (kaycakan), and it too is 
red. It is found in Tpazey, 
a city of India. Its proof is 
thus : when you grind it on 
the whetstone, it does not 
exude (lit. send down) scarlet 
water or drops in accordance 
with its color, but of the color 
of milk, and it fills as many 
vessels with water as he who 


1 Ms, Yen. the stone pf^the seven 


198 


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IL kpti) n) "UnLutnlruii^ L. n <y 5 
uiuutiuiutruij. % fiutju uitiunui^ 
*liiugni- I; nn ' A "bifii/bfc ^1 **** 
uiiuig uujuutfi* 'A ^ njtij.* 


n P 


o-iuniu\Lhj 


. 4' 


nnp 'A a-nJuiilfii juuinnnnj 10 
ifn ijrtfliffii ^ nufiian tjiiiju uui* 


inini/tig 

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'A 
f/n A.hp-nJ uiutfli nn.no. A* J 


ui 


lfb 


- 20 


A 


'A 


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nuui 'htfuiiini.p-lruiii l 

uih* puna nnn 

Cfltuin 

n/i oMian 

trnltlfuutu : 


95 


ulfii tjujju uiLutulju , I {fulfil 'A 


'9 


2 ii^s. ed. 


199 


The zmrukht (emerald) is 
green and yellow colored. The 
one is found in India; but 
the other in Ethiopia, where is 
the river P'ison. They relate 
a fable that it gives second 
sight. 

The kayc (carbuncle) is lu- 
miniferous : it is found in 
Kargedon in Libya, which is 
called Africa (Ap'rikey). It 
has the power of giving light 
in the dark like a lamp. 


whets desires. It weight, how- 
ever, does not diminish, but 
the gem is the same as it 
was, neither lessened nor di- 
minished. What comes out 
from it, however, is useful for 
afflictions of the eyes and for 
those who suffer from thirst 
and those who go insane from 
the sea grape, although some 
of the doctors give these drops 
to drink to many. 


The third stone is the zmrut', 
which is also green yellow (sic), 
and is fed (sic) with oil, and 
is in the emerald island on a 
mountain which they say is, 
watered with oil. 

The fourth gem is the kayc 
(carbuncle) and it is in Car- 
thage (Kark'edon) in Libya, 
which they call Africa (Ap'ri- 
key), and it is found at night 
after its likeness to a torch 
(lampati). Those, however, 
who possess it are unable to 
conceal it, for. although they 
cqnceal it with many vest- 
ments, the rays appear. And 
the divine scriptures say of 
this gem that it is in the Pison, 
saying : There is the ruby 
(sutak), and the gem dalia- 


200 


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.19 ms. 

; 6(1. 


27 ms. 


201 


The shap'eyay (sapphire) 
is crimson purple like black 
velvet (eyk'samiton). It is 
found, however, in India. It 
has the power to heal tetters 
and herpes. 

"With its milk they anoint, 
passing it over a whetstone, 
and it comes out. 


t 

The yaspis (jasper) is like 
the emerald (zmrkht'oy) of a 
yellow color, is found on the 
banks of the T'orgomentos ri- 
ver in the country of the Cas- 
pians (Kasbiacwoc), and they 
say. that wild beasts are fright- 
ened away by it. 


nak (green, i. e., nQaaivos) (1), 
which are (lit. is) the'kayc 
and the green gem (kanac) . 

The fifth stone is the shap'- 
eyay, which is crimson purple ; 
like to the red sheen of black 
velvet is its appearance. There 
are many kinds of these, how- 
ever. They say that there is 
also a blue one like lapis lazu- 
li, and this they say is found 
in India of the Ethiopians.The 
statement is made that kings 
frequently fasten this gem on 
their tunics (k'lamidsn = %hd- 
fttida?) and in their signets. 
Though they also say that 
when one grinds it and an- 
oints it with milk, it eradicates 
diseases of herpes and tetter. 
It, too, was the vision which 
Moses beheld when he appea- 
red on the sapphire stone, as it 
says that beneath his feet a 
work (lit. construction) of sap- 
phire 9 (2). 


The yaspis which is emerald 
green and is found in. the 
mouth of the T'ermondos river 
and at Amat'und not that 
which is in Cyprus. There is 
another which is grey blue 
and another, too, which is 
found in the mountain of 
Phrygia, like to the blood of 


1 Qen. 2, 12 2 EJxod. 24,. 1Q, 


202 


nn iiunLinUi 
qunnui if. fit-tail m q.huiuitjuijt) 
Lui na-triljoi 'A illrnjih 

"f- n /-< h uut 
5 *uifuau huuiunLuiuih uiununji 


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1 otLUttH IfUJn fc Jutuii 
J 


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orb UIOIL uniiuii It 


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m nLuuihj) a-utui* 

IL tL.hi.ui unnuui m Aw., 
nuiguun hiTutuuii IL 1 
m 'A nuuin-nnn IL nt 
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a-h-gh quuun.ni 'A Jar n fill 

OLUI ihld~\ Juiuu ah uiulru 
i til 111. t 

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uiqiuug *n inuiaiunnu JJjiui h* 20 
luh nun f\uaiq jtruunq-uuiuh 
Jhq-hnnu* qh fa hffii uuuuuunA 
llfuq-hnu un\lrntruiL\ nnnj 
n.njuu "utTufu Irnltu nnji}-nj 
huitf uou trnu^nj i ^>JL OLUIUJ^ 25 
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t huh uitinL quit Ann 
ith Ainn* uuu^uuu * h i/uinn.^ 
liiuul;* i trnuiifa.n Jhiftrnliuojt 3 
ujuuth IL uuhmh ^njiaiuiuiuitruui 


4 PIS. bffn 


7 JUS. ed. pifuiviniuq.^iaf 25 

28 


203 


The ligrion (ligure), which 
is the hyacinth (yakund), 
whose provenience we do .not 
know, but we think that it 
exists in upper Ethiopia, and 
that it is like blue linen or koy- 
enoy, a bit purplish. It has, 
the power that fire does not 
burn the cloth in which it 
stays. It is also useful for 
Women for easing travail. 


the purple mussel, and there 
are ma*y kinds of it and colors. 
There is one which is like snow 

,j 

or the foam of the sea, or 
when they mix blood with 
milk, as the philosophers (sic. 
corruption of Maaaay^rai) 
drink for rousing fear in ^ani- 
mals, as the fabulists say that 
wild beasts fear a man with 
whom this stone is found. 


The jfigiron, as to where it 
is found and the manner of 
its finding, we have not been 
able to learn or to discover, 
neither from the naturalists 
nor from the previous scien- 
tists, but I thought that it 
existed in .the upper Thebaid, 
because they say that there 
are certain stones of such gems 
there in the temple of Askle- 
pios. The ligiron, however, is 
interpreted as the name of a 
certain animal termed lingion, 
whose color is similar to the 
fawn (lit. colt) .of a doe or 
to the red <colored> hie- 
fer. They find such stones 
in the inner Scythian barba- 
rians. There is a deep gorge 
impenetrable for men, sur- 
rounded Jrpm. this side and 
from that by craggy moun- 
tains, so that if one peers 


204 


'/r 


>[, 


nuiuiuil^ &.nnnfiii tuii 5 


tun. 


' ft 


iTui^uuuiutnuin Ifli 10 


'lib 'A JlrnnLuui ' fr 
uiuiLu Annnfb* u. 
fyfti ^fr Jfru 

uina~iLjiitlit nn pJiuilitruii 
'ft a-uijnu JhiTuiaui P^l- 
i fiViuufru * h funuuiti^t 
u uin-huii u it hub, atrnlru ' [i 
uuiinuinu il hiiuiali* u. 9 n AtrnlU 20 


nt-n 
n if hub i 
n 


i ti 
h. uuiuujfiufi 

J9-^ n,f> 25 
nu mi us ' ft 


oi 


fiuiiii 


jns. 


205 


from the summits of the mouri- 
tains above into the depths as 
from a wall, it is impossible to 
see the bottom of the gorge, 
but by reason of its depth it 
is veiled in murk like an 
abyss. Those, however, who 
are sent thither by kings to 
find the gems have pain of 
death laid upon them by 
compulsion. They slay lambs 
and" cast the carcasses from 
above on to the bottom of the 
gorge, and the gems sink into 
the flesh of the lambs. The 
eagles, however, who dwell 
on the summits of the crags, 
descend, following the odor, 
into the depths, and take the 
flesh and carry it to the 
crests of the crags. By such 
means they observe whither 
the eagles bring the flesh, and 
they come and find the gems. 
They (the gems) also have 
the following power : even if 
one sets them upon hot coals 
in a fierce glow, they them- 
selves suffer no harm, but they 
cause the coals to go out ; 
but also if one takes these 
stones and wraps them in a 
cloth, and puts the parcel on 
the coals, he who holds them 
in his hand does not feel the 
fire, while the cloth, in which 
the gem is, is neither harmed 
at all nor charred. The gem 


* fa Lnnffii 


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5 o&hn IL 


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g uijtuiuAuignL. 


Jtuub 


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uinuiuinnLUui jntyuiuiuiui 
'btrinJ uuthuiuiL nuui "uiTui^ 15 
*linL.p-lriMiu tf&nj* h. uui J ft linn., 
iTtMtbu JJliht-p-uunLng iLinuiuht p. 
uiji uiLuiinii uin.fiLO'Ui&u. IL 
uin.fiL&-wutlru[it) 1 n /* ^P'k "ift 
itrutruii 9fmi/ u. ob-truii quilr* 20 
ohuu n/uuypHrtuiu'b *i jo* ' 
It 1 fi l^utn^iuigu^ iftrnJ-fc 
inlrjngii qhJ-hifii IL 


i rf&iu au IL *l ui jl_ n g 


luAiaa t 


25 


pjuui 
2/truia.lrnnLp-lruAu un 


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7 ll&nj] HIS. ed.ll 
8 mS. iphq^nulipp 13 HIS. / 


"unnut 
* L q-tau/bp uui * 

7 HIS. /tfiiffrctaif/i/r 


The akat (agate) is found in 
the land of the Scythians. It 
is like the hyacinth (yakund) 
of a bluish appearance, having 
the color of a lion. It avails 
against snakes and other poi- 
sonous reptiles. It is white in 
color round about like marble 
(ms. scorpion) or like ivory. 


The amt'iustron (amethyst) 
is completely round, deep 
flame in color, but its ray is 
white. It is found on the bank 
of the Libyan sea. It is said 
that it foretells rain and storm 


itself helps in the travail of 
women by giving easy birth, 
and also dispels mischievous 
powers. 


The akat is gray blue in 
appearance, having a white 
belt around it after the like- 
ness of marble. It, too, is 
found in the land of the Scy- 
thians. Another agate has the 
form and the appearance of 
the lion, which if orie whets 
it with water and anoints the 
places bitten by snakes and 
scorpions, it drives out the 
venom from the bites of vipers 
and scorpions and other beasts. 


The amet'iston is flame co- 
lored around its circumference 
with a deep tint, but its fire 
(lit. rays) is white. It is found 
on the banks of the Libyan sea, 
and the fabulists say that it 


-2(58- 


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Junuuia-utt 


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ini-uutiputjf_ tfutiip npu^^u 

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aur^ tp2Utu[p* It utj[_ liutj "" 
'itifitfu 4" uuthutuil^ ifntfnjt It 
utii Luti nn k ^tTui" 
U. n-tnuiuli uiu '/r 


6 ms. ofyMl; 11 ms. ed. 3 ms. *mA* 25-26 ms. ed. 

14> /r ms E suppl. ed. f^ff supplevi 


209. 


(lit. winter). 


The oskeyk'ar (chrysolith) 
is the color of gold. It is found 
in the well on the bank of 
Babelon. It aids those who 
suffer from the stomach and 
bowels, when one grinds it 
and drinks it. 


The biurey (beryl) is gray 
blue, sea-colored, transparent 
(lit. air color). It looks like 
the water - colored hyacinth. 
It is found in Mt. Tauros (ms. 
Tiuros), in the bed of the 
Euphrates. When held against 
the sun there appears in the 
midst of it a gleam of light. 
There are also other beryls. 


foretells the south wind and 
storms and tempests and snow. 


The gem oskeyk'ar is what 
some call the oskeybiurey 
(chrysoberyl). It is the color 
of gold and occurs on the 
banks of the well in Babilon 
by the cliff of Ak'iminiday, 
for the father of Cyrus the 
king was called Ak'iminas, 
as certain people relate. When 
one grinds it and drinks it, 
it causes those who suffer 
from the stomach and the 
bowels to become healed and 
cures them. 

The gem biurey is gray blue 
in color, sea-colored, transpa- 
rent. It occurs at the base of 
Mt. Toros, If one holds it 
against the sun, there appear 
within it little gleams of light, 
like grains of millet. There is, 
however, another beryl like- 
wise, like to the eyeballs of the 
dragon, and there is anothe'r 
which is like to white wax, 
and another which is like ice, 
and this is found in the bed 
of the river Euphrates at 
Mt. Toros. 


ui 


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inutlrui} 
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numJin P~uitLtUL.nnuMn* uti IL 
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10 a ink n Kit m tLiniutt nmui 

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Iff>J>) *Uui IL u-nn 
h*-n i 


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itriunfli J 


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iluiuli all hnnLlitLu iTuinii.uuj'u 
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naiuup. uuinanuioLnili uitru~ J5 

IfEHruii h tuiuuintL. uilrnhu 
ijuniu ifuunnLn 


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p. 50 


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7 ante fa + ms. 

qunuui uij ipuing If n 

10 supra iluiptipfi + ms. 


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8 ifbuwg] ms. ed. ifuiqng ; connexi 

10 ms. IfiaffLui^ng 17 p 

"hiupq. utbiipu > ed. 

21-23 Heading in red. 


-211- 


The eyunk (onyx) is. blond. 
In it the brides of kings freely 
rejoice. There are also other 
onyxes. It helps with ague ( J ) 
It is found in India. It is said 
also to be fair and joyful to 
to behold. There are other 
onyxes also, white with heal- 
ing qualities and similar to 
marble. We do not know the 
place whence it comes, but 
they are fair to behold and 
they are efficacious as well 
according to their potency. 


The eyung has a blond color, 
and the brides of kings and the 
daughters of magnates rejoice 
in it greatly. There are Other 
onyxes as well, like to the wax 
of honey (ms. hair) in their 
color but certain people de- 
clare concerning them that 
they are coagulated from drops 
of water. They call these 
onyxes, giving the true deri- 
vation, because the nail of man 
is shining and, together with 
the blood, of a ruddy appear- 
ance. They also call the marble 
stone falsely onyx, because 
of the pure whiteness of the 
marble. 


How the names of the pa- 
triarchs are written on the 
gems. 

The sons of Leah (Liay) 
begotten by Jacob are as 
follows : Roben, Shmavon, Le- 
vi, Juday, Isak'ar, Zabolon : 
and the sons of Rachel (Hra- 
k'el) : Joseyp', Beniamin. And 
(the) sons of Bilhah (Billay) 
the handmaid of Rachel, Dan 


1 Peeters ' itch ' from arable 


nri // 


'ft tliutiuiu jHMt^uihuuuiuitr* 5 
Kit uiiuuifcu, fftouffii* 'A 


Ililru/i* nifnni./3-uj 
Qnt.n.iu i fi LiMiifrii) ftutituii* )/ 

iiii* 'fjb-ihp-uiihjjt* t/ww.,10 
i fjiUitL iin.nnnitii) fi^ 
t Jiuuinutnuii* 


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nuL^nu/rAt Qoutrthutf 

ntrtflii f^tfhhutJtfiilf /rnrtLbcLhi 15 


uui 


4 Post Mjuhp + ms. fiio 


213 


and Naphtali (Nep't'alim) ; 
and the sons of Zilphah (Zel- 
p'ay) the handmaid of Leah, 
Gad and Asher.(Aser). And it 
was written on the breastplate 
of the high-priest as follows : 
Reuben on the sardion, Simeon 
on the topaz, Levi on the eme- 
rald, Judah on the carbuncle, 
Dan on the sapphire, Naph- 
tali on the jasper, Gad on the 
ligure, Asher on the agate, 
Issachar on the amethyst, 
Zebulon on the chrysolith", 
Joseph on the beryl, Benjamin 
on the onyx. Thus were the 
gems assigned each one to their 
tribes. 


214 

u fjj^uiitifu fitu/-utitfiij 

p.utt/-utii[i t^utl^ututt fault jiun.tu9[ib 
Itutna-jiit uutniLJtnii $ uiutuittftnLi $ nunnLJuui t faulj bnbnnnn. 
LutniLb* uin.ut9fii uilfb Lutio-'ii* jutihlrnunU j uiuuthu : It trrt^ 
nnnn. LuinnLJb* uin-Ui^tfb ualih ihn-hnnii* uiliuiut * uitfuild-hu^ 5 
innu : [iub innnnntL liu/nnfib* uMtLuiTjfli tutfii nuli^puint p.hu v 
nan* bnniJliuli . ' 

UM\ ft ut nij-jinu A.l^ufli uii^/f/rnfi Ifinu/iinL^-ni *bi/u&lrtui* It. 

A unn j P^~)^lk* h u b 

irp.* qfi $[*"'/ 10 

a lin.ut ui uijiniii. tfHri5i ft iTuinnLuflil; It 
p.J-jli^n It fi uui f fni_a.lfu tLo-uin-ttlrui i 
It t; i hliuin-nfli fu n/iLbuiinlru/ii . //. tLuiu/L/i h f\iup.lri tfb tf/rn& 
ijjjinnnu utrjunt-firlrijuli - iiuiuiuiuliu uiunuututruui ^tui tuo~nj 

n ./<. uiUiinSian. luuiniunn 1.13- truth ~ - ^5 


7 ms. liuiuipuibn 8 ms. upn 14 ,mS. uijuiifuilig 


THE VENITI AN EPITOME 
Concerning the twelve Gems. 

For the breastplate is divided into four parts : in the first, 
row, the sardion, the topaz, the emerald : in the second row- 
the first gem is the carbuncle, the sapphire, the jasper.; and 
of the third row the first gem is the ligure, the agate, the 
amethyst ; but of the fourth row the first gem is the chryso- 
lith, the beryl, the onyx. 

1) The sardion .is like a slice of salt fish, and its medicinal 
power heals what has been cut with a sword. Philip,however, 
is typified by its being in the first place, for by the divine 
fire he purged idolatry from mankind, and healed the sick 
by savor. Reuben is also divinely inscribed upon it. It is red, 
of the appearance of blood (at^arcod^) and is found in Ba- 
bylon near to Assyria. It is the healer of tumors and swellings, 
the driver-out of evil and the bringer of peace. . 


216 


Jlhnun* 2Jrn.uiU-.hn 


li liutnifhnuta..ni^ 
* UuuiU hut i uiuutU, uutio' h < 

F"yg tj-tnufuh A S"i""L^ 

5 ^uJi^UJ^Ii^iiiL.liuiij nnn hnp.hifii 

^utputl^nth^n IL.UIJIU ft '/j? 

t putnf*ut It inhuhuti ufutja-utn. 

. li unL.utn'autahutj i/uiauirLtr^, 

tf/^ 1 U.1 l "l tfruul P Ui 3"3'* t t", 

10 *t7l^ Mn lf^ /'"^ ynp-lruut 
fif*t t ' a nnuu uiilki wtL 


n 


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^ nft 

/'"A f linnui ui* 

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^ if^J aiuLututitiU LiuiulTUiijt l n p~ 
tf-tuiP i truni. nn auut fi a.J-}ltui n 
p -jlruuiiifi m l/ianiftin h9n L^ 
nullity nvni_nli niiin jii^nnLnf* 
%Q /LnLJitijLi uiji liuifJ'liui ii-ii fii* 
li. iTinL. autanLU uiuuiuu n n^ 
LtutTfi ihunnU^ IL jlrutnj 
IL uttru ibuMtTa. 
n f linL.uinlruii. It. 


iiuii 


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uut 


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If at ft if fi ft 1; *hifutUni.p-lrutifa. 
IL -inuSiifi fi Qnuiiun 

rj : uttttv. ^lujt^ 5 


IL thnnA. uililtLu 
ah inntf-tuiP ilrunL. nj> auut ji 
a.{f-juu/g* ni Lutnifpn 
nufht; uvnL.au IttuiP 
UL.UJV'U nuuihL.naL.iT 


JtirlrtLuhinn o^niltujp'u 
nil nnn ^uinhuti 'jlruutuutL.* h 
' uutaniLiP utiTufii l!t u ' UJ l A 15 


u. ft A.h'L.nfu m 


hut ill;* h uut Ir 
fflutlft-fcnu 'ithuinuta.aht nn. 
niiLuu-uti nliutja-utlfu uii.fr" 
ututnutupu aiun-iun-UfjKrnu* 
nhiutLuintruti htfiuuutifa tutu 
TtnutUL inL.uutL.nnlrut.n i 


6. Supplevi. 


217 


The Jerusalem Epitome. 

** 

The topaz is scarlet in color 
similar to the gem carbuncle, 
but it is found in the city of 
Tpazey in India,where once the 
stone-cutters found it in the 
midst of the stone, and, ob- 
serving it to be shining and 
being pleased with it, they 
sold it to .the Alabastrians for 
a cheap price, but the Ala- 
bastrians sold it. to the The- 
bans for a higher price. These 
brought it to the queen who 
.was ruling 'at .that time : she 
took it into her crown, fastening 
it into the middle of her fore- 
head. When some one of the 
leeches whets it on a whet- 
stone, it does not exude -(lit. 
send down), water after its own 
color, but of the color of milk, 
and it fills as many vessels, 
as he who whets desires, and 
thereafter it remains as be- 
fore in weight and appearance, 
"neither having diminished ' 
nor grown less. And it typi- 
fies the blessed Matthew, who, 
by exhibiting the spark of the 
sun's (?) rays, illumines by 
it the intellectual eyes of 
those who were in the darkness. 


The Venetian Epitome. 

. The topaz is Symeon and is 
also scarlet, like to the car- 
buncle, and is .found in To- 
paz, a city" of India. There 
they were cutting stone, and 
they found it in the midst of 
the stone. The test of this 
gem is that when one of the 
leeches whets it, it does not 
give forth red water or drops 
in accordance with its color, 
but of the hue of milk. It 
heals thpse who go insane 
from the sea -grape when 
ground on the whetstone, 'and 
fills many vessels and does noj 
lessen in weight and form. It 
typifies the blessed Matthew, 
who, by exhibiting the fire of 
the evangelical rays, illumina- 
ted by it the blinded intellec- 
tual eyes. 


218 


"- riuttLjiu ^ "ill 


anuf* ut liiuli utunLJt ni5tjt* It. fa nn f f j lrnnu put'unu vault It. tin 
finifa-uijtutunu J ilutuu ah . ununt- nnut^u uiutrti uinfLnLgutuIri 
nufitutautu AJip-nJ nitrujnJt niTn[uui* nn p *ulrnnu Jtuttt 
a&-nil'u ItutnJhn ^nLtt^ h ^UfL.pl^it \ fiu/f utjf.^ utulru h ^Irnnu^ 5 
tttino-t; iLinbuii lutUriLJt fn-ft linilniiq I It' n-uiufuh h 
b nlrut* It. uut I; iLut^ufuutltLi IL nonm-fdr hub niAfi fL/iinni.*, . 
ItHrujU IL h Jlrnuii pi /tuft/tug It. ^iu < t> Iri h n.lriFu nnuifcu 
^ui ^ i>lri ti J It uiuiia-iun. n.trnlrglinL.p'jiiLU h*-n tutiut uinSbt; 
auiLlriftiunuibih'b Qntl^ufliunL. nptunnnnt-ff-nL^f nn utL.o~ niflrn\Q 
jbnn ^ui LJ) ^nu-L.nju uiL-buiui nuiliuihuuu fiiun-uttLuji/tt-pj)* It. 

iLutliutuniu jitLunu tiut,nuitrliuiuufb ulfUutn J. 

rt-j \juttyit* Qnt-iLtUt It. Ln^jt unLinutlt* 'utTufltt; Lnutltp It 
nt-uuth IL ft r*n)/rni tj.uiut*bji ipujj I iTuttTpiU IL jt 1jutp t pfrn.nu 
Ippwn.nnn j^JJtnpli^*ann ni^tutLifb j3-^ut^ui nut nit I; tLiunnuP 15 
^ut'i/ii.Irn&fiL m P' tu ^}h* "ill utpututjtu ifiuiji. f- u 'JH 
<J>hunit njrui tLuiufuji nu in a_pnn ! IL 5: uut JJfun.nlrutu 
pnttbrtntl ^nnil ^nn.L.nju It. P""? *finhiiintiuh htutilruti^ 

tr\ fcuiifipL.nuu J ftutb J IL uui ^linuAn-ti.nj'u* "{JL -" 
nnL.tl\unn-liU IL P~'l- utliuflio ni///pin/rpnnj luftuinApi iLi 
ti 3*uiL.hnu Jfp-hnutujnL.nn t fi tFuuutuubfi IL ft t pnutJpp- 

iui~&utnt uutuin* nil nlio'uii nnt; uut u. uiluinn ^uii uia~ itr^ 
utriuj liutfd-utiPp. JzeAAWf^* unuu ' IL uultutu* IL nuut Irutlru 
JJ*ntlulru pint- mnfto JJ^uuinLO-nj jt itrn^tifu^ It. uut onjtuutlt 
lrnuiulrinju Qfutt-nnup* nn ilrnliu uii.tr in ui nutup'u ppnlL nutLn. 25 
ihndtnntutttufu utnutn nliiuiPu [tL.p* I*""- ^nlrutjuu ^nhuti IL nun. 
^ Qt; IL utJIfit* nnnil IL uutJtfulrulrutu jui^krnutL. J 

a) fujHU/pu { fftUitL- : utbiiilrujirp. aiTnnntuinj np/dp/rutu* 
uJttu nlrnlfli* utit IL /f//ni/w/n_ny'i> li. pujnt/uta-pt-in J. a-liu^tL.nfu 
IL luutnuitrui)* litttja- It ltuiutni_uiuili* utL.iL.utiiuuiu IL u 


3 ms. uippngui'iihi . 3-7 ttis. unify 8 ms. ilkpui 10 ms. 

B/fi.4w&fr/?L 15 HIS. Ifpbiugng mS. piU%niT 18 ms. 

C,nr L nj'ii 21 ttlS. bpfinuiiugng 20, 2l^,^? 27 


219 

3) The emerald (zmrukht), Levi ; it is yellowish-green, but 
this stones has many other name; sometimes it is called 
Neronianos and sometimes Dometianos, because these,as they 
say, used to drink it(?) with various oils... the emerald mount 
which is on (lit. , above) the Red Sea on the way to India. 
Others say that it was discovered by the gem-cutter Nero, and 
was called by his name. It is found in the P'ison river, and this 
is the dahanak (green) (2). It has the power of knowledge. It is 
also found among the Blemmyes (Blimac), and it reflects back 
the image like a mirror. Its shining beauty portrays the 
preaching ofthe evangelist John, whose evangelical ray 
anointed us withthe grace of the Holy Spirit, and made us to 
live the life-giving fiope of the evangelical life. 

4) The carbuncle, Judah ; it is also called satak (ruby). It 
is like to a coal of fire, whence also it is found by its radiance 
at night. It is in Carthage of the Libyans in Africa. He who 
has it, even if he conceals it with many a garment, it is not 
hidden but shines forth. It is also found in the river P'ison 
according to the Scriptures (1). And it is Andrew (Andreas), fla- 
ming with the fire of the Spirit, and crucified even as was Christ. 

5) The sapphire, Dan : And it is of a purple color, but there 
are many kinds,and it is the king's stone of the gold-embroi- 
der ed khiton. It is found in India of the Ethiopians. It is 
frequently set in the signet and tunic of kings, for it makes 
joyful and dispels sickness. When ground with milk it heals 
tetters and herpes, and Moses beheld it at the feet of God on 
the mountain (2). And it is the type of the blessed Paul, who in 
the labors of an evangelist made his will like -to the incon- 
stant breezes a Jew to the Jews, a heathen to the heathen 
and all, whereby he brought profit unto all. 

6) The jasper, Gad. In appearance it is like the emerald. It 
is vine-green in color. Its colors are many and its provenience 
varied; it is wine-colored and ash-colored, flame-colored and 
gray-blue, transparent and like ice, or as when one mixes 

1 Of- Qen. 2, 11 . 2 Exod. 24, 10 : 


220 

fffrpuj. b^uitT n put feu ptuin^ib-uir utnbutu [faff- l^ut^ii t 

/ ' ' . 

juinaii ftiTuipJ-nuu It fa fj> npL.n.pui It. tun. bp.nuilrnhu 

jbtibpuu KHrnu.utn.ujunjnu (sic) tj-O-uini* n-utuufttutn bnbliL.n fa 
It. npuiniTuiun Jut nut in fib It pbpfc tttt^uHtutlflt Qfbuipnup* 
nn nJbn.binL.p'hLli *fiphuuinuh hrpuipA. ft iTutntfiift jtL.pnul* : 5 

^j * fiiSi tf.fi n nil* nn /rn/rtr^/u/nujn LL ^ uui \JJ\ulrn t nun nut 
a.nLinu ni ni.ntrp n luuiuiiiuitLnuin IIILUUK^L^> auiin ju~Jf uii lutinn^ 
a.* nnuifcu IL uiiin luibuiun J au/in Ltuna-p a-uitriui ft 
It. jujjui ff~t? tutltniJbi^lt ^ uut . trU IL iitiu* 
(sic) pujnnnFujnn-* puuiu a..uiui*ulfu uiiu uuliuLbjtu fi p.utn* 10 
pLiunnuu JjLjiL.p-uj nn a , hull JJlinL.j3-huj LnnfHt ^jtL.u(jt\unj ^ 
n (Jib nifujii IL fi ^tuiFuttinUu* nn h n $h biuuiuug uij*, 
J hub \ p JJbhL.fi} nuu b. < -^'- > <*n tfjt junn itrnuitTa. 
jblruji tin fi junuui lunnnL.p^b'li^u hjuiLutn J 
uut^utiuutni/rn utnjMianuhf^b-^. 'ja'uuu-UtL.nnujin h 'ruun.hn |5 
unnui nnn n-iun-unu un-nnraritii ' nuutrunLM nit huu h fun nil b 
uihutunh h ytrnifnju ilrn-trujr pbn- ifhuu b. wna^iiLbuin UI!T* 
ubuii nufriuu utn.tr ut i ^ufltlru h a.ui n&nLuu ibnufuny b. uiiu* 
iiflfu iL-intuub J )j ul h- UJr I r f- n "*t ulra-nLMli n^nun jnynL.niinir; 
IL [liijtl* ni ifjiutujt b 13-^ buiuiL. nil uiuitnbu b. ifiihu h buiio-h 20 
binuiLU m uijnfi b. oVlitL.nn uiLiLuuihuiu ^ i flu/ in fS'uinn-^ 
tfuAb nhn-hnnu u/uuiunLU nbn_bnnu hnibubuti b. tj-niliu 
PL n *uiTutu ^ biiffh nnffln b. buiif ubutL. b-nu^ni h uuitt-h an put 
'hnjtphb ri-nLunilt b. ^utt uin. fiii/ina.nu nn "uuiju .pufb 
iiiuJlrulrufu [tliiL. fippumnufi tjiTuinffiinj niflrn.b-1 iiL.p-hLu np.ui* 25 
nultuMiuiL. npuufcu ni. hi in IT mi ( ?) : 

. - ' 

iutupuip* *b Jo/Li jui/fiip-JTi uibuibuiiPp. but*, 
ti*-p9 uufpifiuib iiLub-inil *uil\ifu Aj?/ii h. fa nn uin.lt L.*, 
anp ibubuii //""/ utL.o-ufutru . n^utinnLUio- hJ~h h. 
IL tLiniuiib p 


t 


9 leg. fobpiuj 23 leg. npp-ui. 23-24 corrupte : Peeters 

fututi fi unpui 


blood with milk. It is found in the nation of Amat'on and in 1 
Phrygia and in Cyprus on the banks of the T'ervagandos ri- 
ver. It is the terror of beasts and dispeller of apparitions. It 
bears the token of Peter, who carried in his body the death of 
5 Christ. , 

7) The yiungiron, which is the reed-stone, which is Asher. 
Its provenience is not mentioned by the historians, unless 
under an altered name, as with others of the gems. It 
. is thought -that it is found in the upper Thebaid, and it is 
10 cleat that this is the hyacinth (yakund) : there are also many 
kinds of hyacinth (yakint'ic). These gems are found" among 
the Scythian barbarians. Scythia, however, is a country of 
the north unto the Germans and the Amazons, which is cal- 
led the country of women.In Scythia there is a deep valley, 
15 encircled round about by a mountain, which is dark on ac- 
count of its steep from the grim depth. Men under pain of 
death are sent out by kings to seek it ; these skin lambs, cast 
the flesh into the ravine, and the gems because of the 
warmth sink into the flesh. The eagles, beholding the flesh, 
20 take it and carry it to the summits of the mountains,and thus 
. it is found. A certain kind is reputed to extinguish fire, and 
is itself not harmed ; if you put the rag in which it is wrapped 
on the coals, the rag is not burnt. It helps at childbirth. The 
yigure is interpreted as an animal called yigiron. Its color is 
25 like to the dappled calf or to the black heifer, somewhat 
like the color of the goose. This represents Jacob, who be- 
fore all the rest received with the Christ the cup of bod,ily 
death as he had pledged himself. 


8) The agate (Issachar) is like the hyacinth (yakint'i), gray- 

30 blue in color, having white all around it like marble. And it 

is the color of a lion. This they whet with water and anoint 

the bite of a snake and a scorpion and it heals them directly. 

It is found in the land of the Scythians. It bears the device 

25-26 with Peeters' emendation, or the black heifer's stripes, while it is yet small. 


tjutunftttutlfu /9'utii.lrnufi. nn uuiL.nuiL.nn fianlrL. atun.pL.a- u. 
ifui t pnL.n fiftnh. tjnu/ffi afiutLUtuiu flnfiuuinufi uiL.ufutL.lrij 


P) U^P'b'-"" 1 ""* ^uiu-nijtiu uuu nit in jiL.nni.lfu nLuft 5 
Ln L"F L L "3 ILUa i"J u P~utu&nitLp-lrutu n p.* atujg 'l*l n jf_ i ""it 1 * 
ji iffi^fi'lJ t[./&urlru[if_ Ir filt fi L tun. Ill phut ij frit n.inuib(i* 
r^uui juinLut^uiu.nju nnL.nuAlri n^ntjfflt IL a^JtrnA It 
nu.l nn p-trn^ nbtriuiinL.p-liLU ft frtTnuji ifitut uu/b&utL.nn*b 

filrtutLb nn^uMtju^ nn L nirnl^iuiL.nn^tu ni^ulrn 10 
IL autLnfAuiL J - 

* ur ^. tu i' u O ni i n ^i (^) e uu rt uiuk nu k"J * f-' n ^ rut f_ J^I^F 

p.uta.lrf rfitft* nn 1; ifettti n t nfiifn1tpn..utap uiutrit 
.nnuji p-iua.iUL.nnft lZj>f"f > / iu fy"}/"-/ 1 * "r^l f> UUM 
guiL.jtn L. n nntltuju jig nnJ-utiT itrunL nit u. rnfiuh* IL 15 
onpuutli f\utnl3-nnnillrnu jt uin.ttiplrinn'u nn tftunnn 
ufltA.jtu uuiutgiuL. L. a^iuL-utututntrtui uu h *ftnhuuinu 
n Irian : 

J-iuJ fiftLnlrnu* f^tfuhtuiIKu* uut hiutJ-uta.nfu ^ ut L.n.ututfufu 
uutta /[ibfi uut ft uiuutn.nL.ut a~ ibnjiiiu*. nn linth uiL.nnu ft 20 
jufuuu ffifiniuia a-lruinj { IL f^ f^'"-'/-^'*^ utnlrn.utliutiiu ni.* 
f uffn/i nil IrnLfi fi iffc^'U i nLutuJtutit ,/tu.nu. ^utut /riri ItnnbLnj I 

*f~p) JftinLulfu ^jtrthjS-utnltif t uut ^utiT luuj nuilrut) 
an.niuu^ ntuit-utu utituttip.u utiunnnu njuutlrnn IL ^ui 
jo~uttL.utL.nn tun auut utul/li n uutja'nL.uta'n j/tni uiua-nL.gtTtui % 25 
b u -i it" t ffi ut [' u If^but IrnlrupblTutiu linllru* tlutuu 
u \ IL p-lrnl-; uut nonjfuutlfu J 


11 leg. 8^w^ 14 leg. ./"/""M/jAfl 26 leg. 


of .Thaddaeos, who, a warrior like to a lion and pure like gold, 
transmitted the faith of Christ to king Abgar. 


9) The amethyst-Zebulon. This has within itself something 
thick round about of a bright flame-color. Its ray is white ; 
5 from within it looks like wine. It is found among the Libyans. 
They say it shows in advance wind and storm and rain. It 
bears the likeness of Simon, the zealot of Christ the Lord 
of Grace, which involves a heavenly mystery and example. 


10) The chrysolith-Joseph : this is wholly similar to gold. 
10 It is in the bank of the well of Babylon, which is the rock 

Ok'imonidazi (Achaemenidos). They say that the father of the 
king Cyrus was called Ak'imis. It is a drug for those with 
sicknesses of the stomach and of the bowels, when one whets 
it and drinks it. It is the type of Bartholomew, one of the 
15 Apostles, who obtained purity for himself and made pure 
the believers in Christ. 

1 . - 

11) The beryl-Benjamin. This is grey, of the color of the 
air. It is in the cleft of the mountains which is called Tauros 
in the flow of the river Euphrates. If one should hold it 

20 against the sun, there appears from within a sparkle like a 
grain of millet. 

12) The onyx-Naphtali. This has a deep crimson color. 
The daughters and brides of kings rejoice in this stone. They 
say it is formed from a drop of water. There is another which 

25 they call the marble stone onychite,because of its whiteness, 
and it bears the image of Mat[ta]thias..... . 


224 

U n p-"J fcuffiijtutunt. jj jtutnuttjLnL. Jutult 


f\utjn rftfutruti tLuiuin ifenlrifliuiuU atu j u tuulriuJ* ah 
-utuuiunLU uttT ^nutdhnuiL. J-nnnJ nq,lrufb) jtitLt/* ft 
ti.tr nni_p-trufb \ It quttu fiut utuutunlru nnn.L.nnu Jtunuttfth 5 
jlrnl^njtu fiutp.fr/uinLng I utn.^^ &.hn liuihiujj) h. 
A.lra " ["I- [>,[>' "tbllbnljj* &.ba lujn.fiu h. ^'^'"/'/'^/^ 011^ 
"hnpui : L. jlfut uijunnfiL u/n.a/A nuin-uiliu 1 U 'J" 
L.nn uMulrintI* I*",!" ffi*} tunutuij^ &hn 

u ftbj juiL.lriia^t nniufcu tun tun JJ brj-lrl^jiutj It U^fauy* 10 
ututututltlrutu fB-iun-iULtinli auip.lriutni.na ijutuu nnn j 
iuuu/Lnlfi/ni-ft-ftLi/* It Autiftii /&"- liufuiuju Jiut* 
nu^pu/g fiLn/ruAn It PLUIUU UHL.UIU /uuttufcfi'u '/r t/ffnuii 
utu fttfnj qnn nj ^nutifiujlrij^i *unnut utul; ${> 
It tuju a-trnnn ufbnt-ttfuu -nLunLnjin J*l*n* rtuiuan tfpu 
jtult ifltLuli U tt phtu $ f\wia utunt-uiun m n.trnfi'b ft 

ft/rnf/b u-utnutujt nt-ittrffit* *t nn hnstfu juijuiuni.Ii)-[tLli 
% "4/7 uituiuku uiuuinlruii quttunufiLt jputunh tuun,lru 
tinlfuiin Jlfltu JJnui huu ifftLuu fJjJ-UJ t fiutin fcn/rif[iu/j{/ ./ 
inuiuinutltli utjuujtju utuutq* utuiututunLuu utuutn nuiutu Yiuuu 20 
*unnut I 1 "!/ ' *Ju& '> 7 utiuutfcu utu* jutntrutt. lutltfbutju 
J-nnntfnLniLU ft tltrnuji *unnut tun.' A t puj nlina-tfi uunuut* nntuku 
It a.n/fiui fa iMJULttf^ltuu { uu/tg tLuiiujt luuitnt.tl* 


liuut 


luiiini-tP u/Ln/Si/ui///!, It n.uiLUtuufltu 
UMUO.UMI. jtrnltujig ft tf9 i^lrnnau It fuuMU&.uiutlrujtj 25 

"by <J'u*u tt tuju Iruu/MMibt frith qftiunn. /rn^figfi tuju 
nntahu ah utit ft fiuj it utfcu f/tut jjti.nutjtuiuihi-n 
utLnpttutltu a-nnn I "ill uttfa^uuijuh*it M./ri.n/r'Sr ^ It ni 
/*A &*" IP jutjuiujhufu n^uji nuut ' utjutl* utLnfiu 
uua- l^utif^n um.nuiuu-1 qunnnju f ftufuft^ih qt/ItiujnLff-fiLh 'S^tTut" 30 


MS. 69 4 kpui^iuiunLU 9 uiuh'ii nil 12 

15 jnLUHLuftg 23-24 puipqifiubnLpfrLii 28 juiLppliutfyu 29 


-r- 225 - 

ST. EPIPHANIUS ON THE PROPHET DANIEL 


But on investigating we found in Jeremiah this statement 
that '70 years He commanded thy congregation to be in cap- 
tivity', and this then they shall say to the sons of Israel in the 
5 land of the Babylonians : Take to yourselves wives, and let 
there be sons for you ; plant for yourselves vineyards, and eat 
the fruit of them ;-and after this let them take this parable 
from the land of the Egyptians, saying : Thus shall God do 
unto you, and that shall He add, as He did with Sedekia and 

loAk'ia, whom the king of the Babylonians roasted upon a 
plate, because they had wrought unrighteousness : they com- 
mitted whoredom with the wives of their citizens (lit. cities), 
and spake false words in my name, which I did not command 
them, saith the Lord . Here, however, I shall inform you 

15 of the names of these elders as being Sedekia for the one and 
Ak'ia for the other, but the names are not adduced by Daniel, 
but are reported secretly in another work, which they call the 
Revelation of Daniel, but thus they are mentioned as they 
are written in that place, being termed the one, Aba, but the 

20 other, Ada. In Jeremiah, however, the judgment is re- 
counted thus : he says their torture was being roasted on a 
plate. Daniel, however, says thus : The whole congregation 
rose against them to stone them, as is written in the law ; 
but we found in another translation of Daniel in another copy 

25 that a bolt (lit. rod) of fire also fell down from heaven be- 
tween the elders and set them on fire, but did not slay them 
at once. How, then, is this brought about, seeing that diffe- 
rent statements stand in each copy of the Scriptures? Yet all 
this is easy and not difficult, since they clearly have in mind 

30 the same instance. God desired to show that the testimony 
of the holy Daniel was true on account of which they were 
stoned, and ere yet they had perished, a fiery rod fell down 


3-4 Jer. 29, 10 4-5 Jer. 29. 4, 22 5-7 Jer. 29. 5-6 8-14 Jer. 29. 4, 22 

15-16 Jer. 29. 12-22 19-20 cf. Walton Bibl. Pol. Sus. 5-6, Text. Syr. II 

20-22 Jer. 29-22 22-23 Sus. 62 25-27 Sus. O' 62 32 f Sus. O' 62. 


226 


ffaui t~ n /_ utn - I* ^utnl^n^-trf^ tj^tnuttit It. iff*b) 4/t tftrn.tr ut^ 
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nJtniiui, tL.tr n. ILU l^lrurL-ufuft tffnt J fa u ^ f_nL.lruti^ )jUip.nL^ntLjnun M 
unnutj ijutuu utjun n^utu^lrijruig It. 'uujfuu/u&utinjq Irnjruti 
niTp-n^ulruiH nbnuut IL uiiuuiutulrutg { LL uiiuui^u uitflrLiujii liJlJii 5 
liuiuiui nb niut_ nuut tUL.nifltutglt * jju/nuno~ni.uli puu nuui uiu*, 
lu iuli &.niJi y^uiniiL.a'iii > a.u/LU/auuu ^nlrnt/li ruuih&nutni nn iluuiit^ 
ffmUiUJil^ili ujnnuin iLtuutnnjiLi t 7 ru 4 r f^uiiiuiLnnh *Uutluuih&nL. 
iuiUiunLUli uuiinuinaw I i ft uju \iuuo linnui n uututua nnt.uU . 

ii tLnna-nd* fi AtrnA fffitrtffiuujfi u/Lfifi'bu/g'ii Itnilrnlrtntfii 10 
iflutna.iun^nt.p-hi^lt^ nn uiut; {"'ty ufLtutiU unt-tn fuaut-u/rauA 
n if fr nuii uiljni_uSu h" n j utut^ Sf>[* If* "P I 1 j frnnnt-ani^p n 
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tf-n,j(/-n ntfufuo IrnkuJin oltuAtuju juuip.^ftU UIILUI fi3u ujujinnt-fi^ 

uuikno-iun-uiLbuji uiubi ifbnuui* bfl-1; ni orb aft J5 




iftrn n-.tr nni_fHiLUu autig 


n\ uiii ni_uui^n frbu/ufi "ill b *A^7 fa Jtra-uinu Jiuntu* 
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n*_n/ptw?/4 /ri.n tin nut tuu^jflit u. juuinJJMMiulrui f 1 " 1 }- fa u * n } 
iluiuli jtMUJUTLU/nutuiialtiMMti qufuLnL.JtHrui'u afi ITU a-lrtt trtf\ "flj 20 
ituuuit nnnnJ^t-p-faufii fJ t uuiriL.o-nj U. ifinhnL/fHru/u J-nnniln* 
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nnutfcu lutun-jtiTutii^ alu j" utuiuiutn. unLneA fyuA/r^r uiubintl* 
uijuuulju uitLufcfajt n-uuttrnuirj Jiunuifcijt* L. tin nut IrnlinLrjIruti^ 
fuutn^uutlt^fiu n "bn. A/rtj $ "{11 ff-nt-uuin QnL.rL.uti m ^ uiifp.tr>, 
nbrutn ufuuiL.ntfunL.p- truth A/rnnt $ IL utjuitt^u fa ntriffiutt ft utuuinn* 
L.UI&- trnn-iuLnlfu tflrqi /3-f; tlutuu a fa uirAt;fa e u ufuutL.n^unL.I3-faLu 
'fliutinu nl"J- Ifuiuuiju jnunutnutg u. nnL-nlrutug u. ttuiuu UHL.UIU 

fi i/frnuij U/UULU/U fatTnj 1 nn n $ ^PUJtfuijlrnh tru* 30 


Ms. 1 tffak 4 liuifiiu'biiu/jnjff 10 qnplmijli 13 

16 q.bpnLf3-pLli 18 om. npnj 23 pli^buiiiu 25 q.uuibpuigfi t post quod -j- 

28 om. 


227 

between them and seared them while they were yet alive. 

Nebuchadnezzar then, on hearing about these marvels, in 

eager emulation laid hold of them and roasted them on a plate. 

Thus the whole thing was carried out in accordance with the 

5 law, the stoning, then, through the zeal of the Lord, the fiery 

and consuming bolt which bears out the just judge Daniel, but 

' the zeal and the roasting upon. a plate by the king completed 

their tortures as a consummation which came upon them 

through their work through Jeremiah, the prophecy of the 

10 acknowledged Scriptures : they , says he, who spake 
such words of falsehood in My name, saith the Lord . We are 
not allowed to omit aught of the tale, since these hypocritical 
elders, certain of them had become incontinent and deceived 
the women. By inventing a false commandment they said to 

15 them : An Christ be not begotten, we have no escape from 
captivity, but Christ can be born of none other than us, from 
the great ones of Israel and from the elders. Wherefore. they 
said, each of them : Do thou be complaisant unto us, and 
have intercourse with me, not because of carnal desire, for 

20 I am an old man, but because of the compassion of God and 
the salvation of the people, and then thou shalt receive this 
recompense as reward . These (the women), however, fell 
into the snare, and gave themselves up to sin, wherefore the 
holy Daniel reproves this excuse, saying : Thus did ye to 

25 the daughters of Israel, and they, overawed, had intercourse 
with you, but no daughter of Judah endured your unrigh- 
teousness . And thus the statement of Jeremiah agrees 
(awddst) for us, that because they committed unrighteous- 
ness, they fornicated with the wives of their own citizens, 

30 and spake lying words in my name, which I comman- 
ded them not, saith .the Lord. They said that from 
their race Christ was to arise. And because they told the 

3-4 Jer. 29. 22 11-12. Jer. 29. 23 25-28 Sus. 57 


~- 228 . 


$t;n : uiuuig p tjuiuiulft; "knout jiunnt-gutulri n*finpuuinu t 
uuffcu utu^p*u l^uiuutug'u trpT-^ $/ ^puitTuijlrujg'ungui t 
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^ntrnl/u n-ui LIU nufu fill \ u. t/nfcJ-pSuiLnnL/tf-pLu 'foujp.nLjtniLutiun*, 
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uiii tjujju luuutg </'> /' Sk.tr n^t uiliiultu ununnfali Luinnlri nj . IL 
uin.ui\r)lTi nt.ffu\ iuuuunuii.1 IL p-uia.uiL.nnlrutg tfut^ 
if It'll ^L- gJJ*nJu^u IL ji ilhnuti m JtrnnLubinuii J 
utulf nnuifcu . u-nlruii iiUL.n^LuU fibtunJj UMnn. 
niUL.nl/Uult kuin?u uiulf \ nnuilfu IL jiUL.lrutiunut 10 
uiut; k n * UML -l l ^ t t n . h- *fi tu ["t- ui il; t jf iffSujh. ijQriJ^uiu* 
u : /i o^r uiif^r ^r Jlr nib tun- tip uiuut ^tufup^t iLtuuiuiuutui 
iiuin. Qnn nil nj t; uiuinui atttug uin-ulri* jttuuafi tuunniuu 
*ujb uiLU-Uijt tftra jt ^otiunL-p-tru^ Ju-nuuMO-nuig IP fa ftp* 
l/ M Pf- Jit'utlt 1 nujn&a-uit tjffb pnutLnAn n-Utuiuuuuiut'up jjfiu^ 15 
ritual t;* IL UMtHrutrjttruMU wftifinujL.nL./tHruji/fi Itf-pLn fcjiu aiLUitnui* 
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i ft uiujut&ujn-U UJJI nt-iflrn* nuiii tin* J nnuifcu It jut*, 
uttruuiulri j jtufuup LuiiHrgtruit ffluuinLO-tij utruui*, 
ittiL.ja~pLU f ftUiulilri n ^nLjuiuart (p\ L. ipuin.uiL,np uin-uapi tun.- 
uiJtrulrulriuu* tTufuuiL.uiuiL. ap utnuit ^n ^uiuuiltuiL. L. autai/uin 30 


Ms. 2 om. uibu 15 fcputLiig 19 juiniu^fi 25 

30 iTuniuii.uAiiij) . 


- 229 - 

women thus that God had commanded them, therefore God 
manifested toward them His zeal through the fiery bolt and 
the exaction of vengeance by Nebuchadnezzar and the re- 
buke of the holy prophet Daniel : but <I> have said this by 
5 way of explaining the gem, and the reason thereof was 
stated by the apostle : And death ruled from Adam unto 
Moses over those also who sinned not . But Daniel says : 
As is written in the Law of the Lord ; by the law he means 
Jeremiah, just as the Lord says in the Gospel, the law and 

10 the prophets until John : and the title of Daniel's judgements 
says so here, which it is not convenient to pass over because 
it will greatly help us in our investigation of the inscription. 
Now since the rights of judging had been taken away from 
Israel, and justice perverted with every sort of unrighteous- 

15 ness, so that the admirable Habakkuk, coming to debate with 
God, said : How is it that mankind are like fishes : the greater 
swallow the less ; because judgment was holden before me 
and the judge gave a corrupt judgment, and turned aside 
justice. Nay and those who were in Babylon by yet even 

20 greater injustice rode rough-shod over the rights of all, 
especially in the perversion of justice and in sinful pleasures. 
And it is clear from the elders, from Ak'ia and Sedekia, who 
were mentioned in the Scriptures, that it is also the custom of 
God to let the glory of one person become manifest by means 

25 of another and to manifest certain Ceases through some others. 
Thus it may be seen in the present instance, since God desired 
to choose Daniel, to make him celebrated and glorious for all ; 
particularly because he was a youth in years, many deemed 
incredible the proposal he made in his words. Wherefore 

30 by the righteous judgment of the God of virtues, God by means 
of His wonders made him manifest, and by the righteous 
investigation and the just sentence He made the glory of 
Daniel to appear marvellous and wonderful. Accordingly 
also at the beginning of the tale he puts Johachim in and 


6-7 Rom. 5. 14 8 Dan. 9. 1 9-10 Mt. 11. 13 12-17 cf. H b. 1.13-14 

22-23 Jer. 29. 22 34 f. Sus. 1-2 


230 


"bnnfih 

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^uunL-ja-truiiTpn IL SjiFuinftun hniuLUiiFajt utdlriib uni^L ulun(uiin\ 
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jufbuii ~&uin. fc . IL illrntih Irnlruuitjii a.lrnlrgLnL.j3-lriJutr 
tLL.njli utn.utDJiLnL.p-liL'ii nutnnal;* nnni.if IL yibnnuinii ui niL.ua 
nni.p-fiL*U Jliuij'^ nnnJjj ubnLquubfcfi'ii altuu nuui lUL.njtUiug'ii 
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ILUMI ' IL )*un iLnn&nnli ^nuiUiiuniuliUittniJ- iff^^l* ^ f>uui 
iftinuMaii uituuijiJ- u/iuutnL^iuufi niiiL.nLUlri* fi Junutut IL jlrn* 
li.iL.iJ puinifuig IL ft aii.nL.jnL/iJ-/iLb 'jlfi'i 1 ^hiring : ah utnn.u/np 
iff i LuunfiutiFutlruglrLi* "ill jnt-unJ no-iuuutiuugpb* IL ^iuua.lr^ 
nnLfdlruJifa. ifhjin iuirLUj9ujn-ifj> i hgjfii : nnnJ [fiuutitLiua- 15 
dtuin.uuL.nnti h funn^riL.nnu unpng jiL.nng Jtuin.iuL.nn IT ui iTi jui* 
JlrulrgniSig. nn I; utLn^Ubuii juit-fctnlruiuu* uiJIfti : 


MS. 4 om. zki/iu/r/rw ppiuiLU/ifpf 14 uip$ tfinbughti 


231 

mentions his wife Susannah, and together with the supreme 
beauty of her countenance he proclaims the excellence of her 
soul, wherein he testifies to the righteousness of her pa- 
rents, by whom she was brought up (lit. they brought her up) 
in the law of sinlessness. And as this also was necessary because 
she had to come amidst the lawless elders to be exposed 
and the evil of their deeds was bound to become more evident 
and to receive a fitting punishment for their sins, as a lesson 
to many and as a warning and an object of fear for those 
who came after, in order that the just might not become 
faint of spirit, but become honest through hope, and ever 
patiently forge ahead, whereby the Lord maketh to shine a 
glory in the thoughts of all his saints, which blessing was 
promised in the Gospel. Amen. 


232 

nj'u fyuihJtujunL /[pui rung Lnj* p Jtrinmuulrnnnn^ at* 
an fi (fnilufcih L ft ufuuilruni.j3-pLu QtruinJb t 


Oil n-puitri fi I fan fa utiHruIr ani^b frltf-l; Jutuu utfunnpli p.uiant.iP 
nuinlruin "finpuuinu puut ifuinifiini a-*u/rujf /rnlt J It 
^Inn/L nnp fi ifbniu n riiun^ntiU li_ /faff- uinnjunni ifhiu 
ft' fiu puinn null fill ijutnh uiuniLuiunntiLlirlruili nil in uiunuunj 
nuiiuinlrufltii *finjiuirinuht qjt Irlfb J-nnnJIri a a nni.lrui lult It ft 
inj LnLug yiilruit* ilrnlini,a auiL.uiliuig iTjiuipuiulrinij 
i * n nP Irnptrffii /?/ im-uui^uumlriu . 
hnbini n.inLni uflililrufli ^ ifhui utuu tri nil 

nuiL.uiliph luntLuinui-Id-lrufb fib if- u*ll natt* ap ifn uuutn* 
p-itlitauinL.p-jiLii y/rSjoA^r^- ifnutjb anjulri if Ira UMUIIILU 
Jit "til nnuilfu alt n.jtuint-uglrb L. nnp ijtunui^ilf p 
"finpuinnu ^uiLUJUiuinlrujin Irb* ah fiiifinnpin J^SL a-int-tu 
uflililruflflt niiuthnu Irlfu Jtrn Qbiunjb p iTpujp.ujunL.p-pLU uiun.lr^ 15 
/nif alTnlinLujiu nnu f u*u fi fl*uiDUja.uii* nn fan lutiiuJnn-lTutij* 
h. Juiuu tfilrnujn iiiLiiui^uiinlrini* p fjnnniftfbl; puniutrnuiaLn 
h nlrnll; QnLtLuij* p Jfruiifuipu/j tynjuiuini.ni u. h Qm.a.uujp p 
auiLUjb^ii JJfnpuj^uji/nL tut Ln^itrt nfu It p fi/rnuujnfct; iufu~ - 
JuiibiriLl luujn^uni.ljnLp-lru^'u^ It nn h n.m.[d-uii JJjtTuiuuiui*, 20 
gnj. It p yntLnJiTuija-nLnu pub* p u h f> f*uiL/if-UJf p 
nuji-nputuuju uiiuuinLnj. It luiLn^ua-infu fi 
/,upuj^qujgLnj p npqf; 'hnnp'u O n 

y J 


uinua'a 


9 Lacuna, 9-10 litt. in ros>. ; forte explendum jnuuliuiinui[t. 

uiptj. /r] 11 n <p> Kin * S 


233 

The Blessed Epiphanius the Cyprian on the eleventh 
gem, that is, on Joseph and on the Providence of the Lord. 

Let it be known unto all that because of these many bene- 

. fits was Christ born in the body, and thereafter those who 
5 turned away from sin and clave to righteousness, these fared 
well, because of the love of mankind shown in the coming of 
Christ in the flesh, for He came to gather together those who 
were scattered. He was born from the one virgin, from the two 
tribes together was He born, who had once been driven to 

10 despair now through the stone which became the head of 

the corner, having united together the wall of the lineage of 
justice with the others, lest the circumcision should vaunt 
that from them alone came forth for us the life-giving fruit, 
but rather that those also of Israel who believe in Christ 

15 should know that the true stone, the one chosen head of the 
corner, came to us, making firm in the unity of the Lord the 
two walls : from Rahab (Rak'abay) who was of the stranger 
race, and had been cast out because of her sins : from Solo- 
mon the Israelite of the tribe of ; Judah ; from Tamar the Phi- 

20listine and from Judah of the race of Abraham the blessed; 
from Bersheba and her dishonorable intercourse ; from 
Ruth the Ammonite and eke from the Sodomites ; and then 
from David of royal honor and from Boaz the Israelite, the 
blessed of the Lord, himself also of the tribe of Judah, the 

25blessed .of the Lord : 

11 f. Ephes. 2, 16 f. Mt. 1. 2 f. 19 f. Mt. 20. 42 ; Lc. 20. 17 


THE COPTIC. 


236 


ZOEGA, CataL, p. 608-609. Codex Sahidicus CCLV. 


(2) 
M.N NeYTonoc jgoon (3) 


6TB6 ncxpxiOH ncgopn Nome. 

ncas.pa.ioN neTOYWiOYTe epoq xe HB\.BYX)NION 

s.qTpegp)jg SM. neqeme. ^qreNTCWN GHTBT eroY- 5 
JULOYTG epoq xe c^pxion u. nTpeKtcocgq eqw.oxa, 
6TBC n&.i eY&oYTe epoq xe ca^pxioN. GTBC tcpajt eqxi 
M.IITBT, 


uu&oq 

6YT1TK8S.C s.YtW e^NWLfi.. ekYHXYrH JULM.OOY ^ITN OY- 

nemne. OYGN KG 



epoq xe jui(S)Mfi);e&.c , ewj^q-^otcxeK NSfi.nav.eoc 
*A,OYTG epooY xe CTedwTt)fi&.a,. eqcgoon & neiemeis 
NOY)T,eqcHK NOYKOYI enexoYeTOYtwT, q^opjg (4) 
ON N^OYO ^N Tav.p^H M.nl'OYtM winNavY Ncga^pe 

. OY6N K60Y&. xe w.w.a^Y N^a^YULOYTe epoq xe 
epe OYKXOM. NOYtWBeoj &*SL neqKtWTe 
name N^^^THC. nM N)^pe Npeqxe).xe-2o 

XOOC GTBHHTq, XG J^qNOYtynGBOX Ne*ft.n&,*OC. 

epoq xe nipHNiKoc . 


(1) MS. et Georgi : ^HBCNacgB.- (2) Georgi : 
(3) Georgi : ej900n (4) Georgi : 


237 


(ZOEGA, Catal.,p. 608-609. Codex Sahidicus CCLV.) 
<EPISTOLA EPIPHANII AD DIODORUM.> (*) 


... * vestis humeralis : quorum discrimina (dtcupcoQct _= dia-p. 251 
yoga) alium aliter distinguentia et loca (ronog) eiusmodi sunt. 


I. DE SARDIO (aaQdiov) PRIMO LAPIDE. 

5 Sardius (adgdiov), quern Babylonium (flapvM>viov). vo- 
cant, ex modo quo rutilat ad illius similitudinem, speciem 
refert piscis, qui sardius (aaQdiov) vocatur, quando salitum 
hunc secueris : ideoque sardius (adgdiov) appellatus est, ducto 
nomine a similitudine piscis 2 . Babylone autem gigni solet in 

10 regione Assyriorum ('Aaa^Qiog). Huius lapidis color est limpi- 

diis 3 . Cum <autem> habeat virtutem medicinalem, utuntur 

: (XQCO) eo medici, ad linienda loca prurigine et dolore 'affecta, 

atqueldca in quibus ferro laesio (nXvyrj nfaiyfy facta sit. Est 

ibi alius sardonyx (aaQdcowl- = aaQdovvg) ' quern molochas 

15 (ita)Aa)%as = ^oAo^dg) appellant ; qui morbos (nddog) e- 
mollit qui nodi sebosi (aredTcofta) dicuntur. Huius species 
haec una est, quadamtenus ad viridem inclinata. Pondus ei 
augetur initio (d^) veris, quo tempore morbi (ndOoo) inci- 
pere (aQ%ei=aQx elv ) solent. Alius item ibi est qui sardachates 

20 (aaQdaxdrris) appellatur, circumdatam habens coronam can- 
didam, sicut achates (dxdrrjg) lapis. Aiunt fabulatores ab 
eo morbos (nddog) expelli ; eumque appellant pacificum (tgrj- 
vixoe = 


1 MIGNE P.G., XL III, 324 A ; BLAKE, Epiphanius of Salamis 
on the Twelve Stones, p. 102, 21 seqq. 

* Verbum e verbo : propter nomen similitudinem piscis accepit. 

8 COTC( ; vox ambigua. Legerem : COTIl, electus praestans. 


-238 


E. 6TB6 mame NT(0tt&.XlON. 

cm * tt2Lt)n&&ioN OYttwe ne eqtpetgpttttg 
OYKOYI, N$e M.rctHNe eTOYM-OYTe epoq xe 

NT6 T6NT1&. 
KM NT6- 5 

epoq eqreKei^x CBOX N(I NX^TWJWLOC 


, 

OYKOYI N&.COY . 

pewLnwucpHc ^L OY^OYG I-M.H. NpeM.rcM.aw- 
pnc xe a^YnptwcYNere ( 2 ) M,M.oq NTpptw eTjgoorc M.neY- 10 


M.M.oq <5N TM.HT6 

M.neicfi)Ne ^N OYCM.OT NTGIW.ING. 
M.M.oq SN OYa.K(WNH Nca.eiN neq^e^twc H rceTNHY 
petypcwty a^N Ka.T&. rceqdv.Yas.tt, 5^xx^ 
NOYepODTe. .NNc&,eTpeK uoY^'xe NOY- 
Nicpa^THp H neTe^Ns.K GK^I M.M.oq, wj^Kcyirq 
( 3 ) ON ^M. rceijgi NOYODT eM.eqrft2tB nti 
rctWNe eTM.M,&.Y, awYtw M.eqcBOK &n req^OT. rceTNHY 


ON M.N M,rC&.*OC 6T6 
N6 


(l)Georgi: ^Me$9)T. (2)Georgi: awYtteptWCYNe IC6. 
(3) Georgi: 


239 


I.I. DE LAPIDE TOPAZIO (rconadiov= rond^iov). 

* Topazion (dconadiov = rondiov) lapis est quadamtenus p. 
rutilans, instar lapidis quern appellant carbunculum 
Inventus hie fuit in urbe (jro'Atg) quadam < quam 

svocant> Topaze (Tayndvj) in India (evna= 'Ivdla) ab iis qui 
lapides illic excidunt. Cum autem fulgentem eum eomperis- 
sent latomi (Aarw^og = Aaro^og), illi eo delectati, eum parvo 
pretio vendiderunt mercatoribus Alabastris ('AAdf}aaTQo$).A\a.- 
bastri autem eum vendiderunt maiori pretio (tiprj) incolis 

loAustralibus. Australes vero incolae ilium dono (dcbgov) 
obtulerunt (ngiwavveye = nQoayveyxe) reginae quae turn 
illis erat. Hunc ilia acceptum posuit in media corona sua, in 
fronte sua. Porro lapidem hunc probare (da>KifAas = doxi- 
fid^siv) solent hoc modo : cum teritur in cote (axcovr] 

15 = axovrj) medicinali, sucus (#eA<H == %vAog), sive quod 
ex eo egreditur, non rubrum est sicuti (MCLTO) color illius, sed 
(dAAcO album quasi lac. Postquam autem ex isto compleveris 
multos crateres (ttqarrio) aut quocumque alio id excipere 
malueris, si ilium metiare, eamdem eius mensuram reperies, 

20 lapidemque nihil laesum aut modulo imminutum. Quod au- 
tem ex eo expressum est adhiberi solet ad curationem (0e- 
Qama = Qeqansia) oculorum ; medetur etiam morbis (ndQog), 
qui hydromania (tidQapavla) coniuncti sunt, id est furores. 
Solent * 


1 ZOCGA : Verte : Obstat etiam affectionibus, cuiusmodi sunt hy* 
dromaniae sive furores.* 

Des. PG. XL III, 325 ; BLAKE, p. 105, 16. 


-240 ' 

B 
(Paris. Bibl Nation. Fonds Copte 131 5 , fol. 40). 


<r. erae 


fHpq 


, 40 


GT6 H&.1 TIG 
5 NTOJ9 NNerfO 

oj9. fiqciBK e 


Be it*.? cextww. 

M.OC . 6TB6 

10 we 
xe 

wimepo nU NO 
xeq eNc&. NT M 
BH. H nui^. e 

15 


ntii 


[ ] 


20 N6 


( 2 ) ntw 

NH 


cic. [oY]a.e 


CM.*. 


P&.KTOC 


oc . 


n 


Tq 
pmq 


nej9B[ecw] 


OOYC 
THC. 


[N] 


name 


XOOC 


xe 
nei 


25 


30 


40 


45 


1 Winstedt: <*)epeHXlYOY, et in" nota : Probably? 
[ = J9pR]XOOY * Latin : superius dicti . (2) von Lemm : 
n^epULeNeYC . (3) VON LEMM om. (4) WINSTEDT 
e[ JT6 NHGJ96 [ ] C6YC . 6 VON LEMM : 


- 241 - 

B. 
(Paris. Bibl Nation. Fonds Copte. 131 5 , fol. 40) 

<III. DE LAPIDE SMARAGDO>. 

... (circuiens terrain) * universam * Aethiopum ad occiden- (p.255 a ) 
tern, quae est magna regio Aethiopum, pertingit ad Ocea- l FoI< 40Ra 
num (coyeavoi; = wxeavos). Quapropter dicunt hunc alium 

5 carbunculum (avOQag) lapidem cursu huius fluminis proiici in 
Lybiam \Ai$r\ = Aipy?]), sive locum ubi habitant Aethiopes, 
qui primi eo potiti sunt a . 

Aquilas ('Axittas) interpres (eQftevevrqQ = eQftrjvevr'ijg) lapidem 
prasinum, qui est in Genesi 8 (FevyaiQ = Fsveaig), neque (ovd) 

10 prasinum interpretatus est (eq^sveve = eQjurjve^etv), neque 
(ovd) smaragdum (a^aQatcrog = a/naQaydog), sed (dAAct) 
tantummodo interpretationem (eQ^via = SQ^VSIO) He- 
braeorum ('EpQalos) simpliciter (anhcos) secutus, nomen lapi- 
dis statuit quale (ara...) illud repperit. Quippe vocatus 

15 is fuit bota * lai loco prasini a septuaginta <duobus 4 > (p.255 b ) 
interpretibus (eQ^evevr^g = eQ/iqvevTijs), quemadmodum ^ FoL 40R * 
dixerunt prasinum lapidem, quern Aquilas 
'AMas} appellat ftellium (<prUiov). Hoc bdellium 


1 Cf . MIGNE, P. G., t. XLIII, col. 328A et BLAKE, 107, 13. Hoc 
folium primus edidit E. O. WINSTEDT, Proceedings of the Society of 
Biblical Archaeology, t. XXXII (1910), p. 28-31. 

2 Legimus : [NT&.Y] )pIt2l[Tq] . 
8 Gen. 2, 12. 

4 Obviam hanc coniecturam nos monuit Rob. P. BLAKE, ab An- 
schario de Lemm iam propositam fuisse Bullet. Acad. St. Peters- 
bourg, 1911, p. 327-329 = Koptische Miscellen 1, Leipzig, 1914, 
n<> XGV, pp. 284-285. 


242 


. OYCOtfCN 

ne. ii 

we ne. eYewe 


OYCN 


N&.Y&.N 
K&.T&. ee CTOY 
10 rime SLnoYSs, 
noYl. a^Ycw Teq 


15 


M.6N eCOYBTOY 
(WT. A.Yt 
XtW. H 6C2S.6K 
. TN 


6TB6 WTO 


OY 

20 fcoq 


. H 


25 *[eTO]YM.OYTe epoc 

[Fol.40V] . 


1 WINSTEDT : 

2 WINSTEDT : H&,Jk.OY2UTHC 


NTIN 
. OY6N OY 


[WL]HHjge 


N1NXOC 
ae 6T6* 
WLOC. Ce&) M.GN 


: ere 


N&.BOY2UTHC ( 2 ) 


NX&.1&.NOC 

NC^BHNOC 

N&.1&HNOC 


6B02V.. &.YXO 6Y 
WLHp e^OYN 6N6Y6 


so 


35 


40 


45 


50 


243 ~ 

unguentum est vel thymiama ex India (Evdia *Iv6ta) 
advectum. Octo sunt varietates prasini lapidis quantum 
(xard.i.) singillatim compertae sunt ; eius tamen natura 
(qy6ai<;) aequabiliter viridis est ; modo dura, modo mollis. 
5 Restat (hoinov) ut de colle illo, quern Nero (NrjQcov) vel 
Domitianus (Aofiqnavoc;) oleo rigavit, dicamus in qua regione 
(x<f>e a ) situs sit. Est autem hie in interiore mari (QdXaaaa) * (p. 256 s 
quod vocatur Rubrum (ekvQQa = sQvQQa) in aditu regionis * Fo1 ' 40YJ 
(X&QO) Indiae ('hdia). lam vero plurimae sunt divisiones 

10 (diayo>Qa = diayoQa) Indorum ( 3 Ivdog), sicuti (nata) fertur. 
Primum quidem novem regna erant, nempe : Alabastri (^l- 
"AAdpaarQos) Homeritae ('A^eQirrjg), Axumitae 
Adulitae (AfiovAiTrji; = * Adovfarris ?), Bugaei 
(Bovycuog), Taiani (Aaiavog), Sabeni (Sa^vog), Dibeni (Aifirj- 

15 vos), Sirindibeni (ZiQivdiftqvog). Nunc vero multiplicata sunt. 
Disparata enim (ydg) sunt, et inter se coniungi desierunt. 


244 


pHY. 
NOC W.GN. 

ntwpex eaox 
NNpeqoYess. 

5 TBT . NClplN 

HNoc C) 
pex eBOX NNG 


&.C NNHCOC 


(CMC- b ) 

[Fol - 40VI)J 


KOX. 


NOC. 


eT 

Be MM. iTepi 

eatfi 
. neiTO 

OY &.G KM 6TOY 

M.OYT6 epoq 


20 NON It*. 

ne OYKOYI 


TG efiox fiBepe 

N1KH. HJUL&, UL 

M.OONG Rriee 


neTCHK 

P&.1 CKHJUL6. 60 

OYHY e[Bo]2s. knic 

pO NMAp[ 

M.nec(^Hp NOT 
xo. NOY^OOY. epe 
OYTHY Nctwq e 

. 6T6 

ne 


ON. BepeNiKH 


poq 


e 
e 


WLNTawXM.eC. 


25 


so 


35 


40 


1 WINSTEDT : NClplNXl&lNOC 

2 WINSTEDT : 

3 WINSTEDT : 


Dibeni (Aipevo$) quidem se ab Ichthyophagis seiunxerunt; 

Sirindibeni (HiQivdi^vog) se ab iis seiunxerunt qui in cavernis 

habitant 1 . 

. "Lentibeni (AevTifirjvos) se ab Evilaeis (Evedaiog) seiunxe- (p. 256 b 
5 runt. De his dixi ubi historiam (larwQia = IOTOQIO) attigi. [Fo1 ' 40v ^ 

Mons igitur ille qui vocatur Smaragdinos (aftaQdydivov), 

Romanorum (Teo^ato?) est, parva insula (vfjaoi;) constans sepa- 

ratira adversus Berenicen (Begevwrj), portus navium Indiae 

(Evdia = 'Ivdla) qui ducit in Aegyptum. Distat a litore Aus- 
10 trails <Aegypti> cursu navis unius diei, secundo vento, sive 

triginta quinque stadiis (arddiov). Berenice (BsQevwrj) autem 

contigua est Elephantinae ('Eheyavtlvrj) et Talmis 


1 1. e. Troglodytis. 

" Hie desinit textus a Winstedt editus. 


246 


(Paris. Bibl. Nation. Fonds Copte, 131 2 , fol. 88). 
e x 6 TBe tttMNe 


Fol. 88R] 


Xt0q T6NOY. 

NBe2y.eaw.ooYe . 
tgoptgep xe firfi wi. 

5 M.eT&?v2vON WLft 
TOOY6. 


xe 


10 NT6 
OYl 
N6 

wee. 


15 


ulneicONe xe c 
ne 


20 


HTq 


X6 6TBH 

npeqxe 


xe 
5is.e 


neqeme 


NT6 T 
MBYH. TM 6TOY 

M.OYT6 epoc xe 


x( 


xe 

&.N 

&.XX&. T6YJ9H eq 

NHX eqpH^e xe . 

eBoxaul no Ye ulnec 

M.OT NOYX&.W.IC&.C 
H OYXBB6C 


NOY M.efi ecga-qi 1 


NOYXBB6C N 


25 


30 


40 


45 


- 247 - 


(Pans. Bill Nation. Fonds Copte, 131V fol. 

* cui nunc dominantur Blemmyae. Corruerunt autem metal- p. 257 a 
la (fjL&TaMov) huius mentis. Sunt et alia metalla (aeraAAcov ^ Fo1 ' 88Ra 
in ilia eadem regione barbarica (paQpctQwcov 
) Blemmyarum, qui montes sunt prope 
STalmem (Ta^s?). Ex istis smaragdum (a^aganrog = 
GftdQaydos) effodiunt Aethiopes. Ea virtute pollet lapis 
ille smaragdus (apaQaxroi; = a^dqaydot;), ut in eo faciem 
tuam videns, de hoc dictitant fabulatores : Praescius est 
futurorum. 


10 IV. DE LAPIDE CABBUNCULO (&V$Qa). 


Lapis carbunculus (avOga^) aspectu ruber est. Invenitur 
Carthagine (Kagxydcbv) Libyae (Aiprfr)) quae vocatur * Afri- p. 257 b 
ca ('AffQixtf). Sunt alii qui dicant hunc lapidem inveniri non^ FoL 88Rl 
interdiu, sed (aMdt) noctu dum iacens e longinquo rutilat 
isinstar lampadis (Aa^Trdg) vel prunae. 'Quandoque vero flam- 
mas emittit sicut pruna ardens. Qui autem hunc lapidem in- 


248 


55. 


w. 


ITOYG 
5 OYOI fee*, neitt) 
NG. Brecon 


Sficon 


eq 


10 coYttmq xe 
ne Nceuioocge n 
C&. neqoYoem 

NClBlTq. 


15 W.N ee eTpeq 


r&.p 

W-'me NIUL N 
gorre ty.pe neq 
20 OYoeiN 

CIlH a 

Fol. 88V] 


25^6 nKe<5me GTOY 


ULOYTG epoq. 
Kep&.YNioc. eqei 
fie w.w.oq . "j^pe 
M.OYTG 


NIOC . GTG 

fiHpn HG : 
KGCMNG XG GTOY 
KS.OYTG epoq xe 


oc eqelNe 
^M. nc 

GYBING 


NOYtWT. 


TG. 

TOY^fi^B SS.) 

M.M.OC epoq. xe 


nicpo <|>ictt)N 


GYBING W.M.Oq 

aw. 


4>1CODN r^p ujOYO 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


-249- 

quirunt, cum e longinquo videant eius fulgorem mbdo deficien- 
tem, modo scintillantem, intelligunt eum esse eiusque fulgorem 
persequentes, eo potiuntur. Qui vero hunc in se gerat nullo mo- 
do latere potest. Utcumque enim (ydq) vestibus eum involveris, 

5 lumen eius erumpit "trans vestes : quapropter eum vocant p. 258 1 
carbunculum (avSqag). Itidem (co^eog = o>o/o)?) alius lapis, tFoL 88V< 
quern vocant ceraunium (xegarfnog) similis est huic. Solent 
autem quidam lapidem ceraunium (xeQativios) appellare qui 
colore vinaceo l est. Alius porro lapis, quern vocant chalce- 

10 doniuni (%aA%rjda)vios = %ahxrid6vio<;) his aspectu similis est : 
huncque in eodem loco illo inveniunt. Nee mirum. Dicit de eo 
Scriptura (yea^rj) sancta : Inveniunt eum in flumine Phison a 
(0iao)v = 0siad)v). Quod si in isto r reperitur, bene (aAwg) 
<ita> dictum est : Phison (0tao)v = 0eiad>v) enim influit 


1 Verbum e verbo : color vini (olvoxddfl) ; cf. PLINIUS, Hist, 
nat. 37, 9, 40. 

a Gen. 2, 11-12 iuxta LXX. 


250 


M-Mipoc erfil 


npHC 

HOC 


cfiH b 5 

[88Vb] 


M.M.A.N 

ntwre 


CODN 


epoq 


10 


6YC1T6 


NT 

15 MBYH. xer 
p&.<j>H ra^p eTOY 

. 2CCWW.W.OC 

OY6N oYeie 
po NHY eBO^fi e 
20 xew.. eqncwpx 
eqxo 


M. 


M.OOY ire 


THpq NNGY 
ei2v&.T. eqeiul 

JUL&.Y N^l RNOYi 

RNOYB xe w.ft 


eq 


fitfi 


CTfiG 


Rome Rc^nn'i 

POC neTOYWLOY 

TC epoq &nei 


25 


30 


35 


-251- 


in mare (ddAaaoa) in parte (xa.rd ftfyos) austral! 
= e&xeavo'g),ad occidentem. *0ceanus vero (Q)yeavog=Q)xecn>d<;) p. 25* 
circuit terrain universam ; verum (dUd) Phison (0iacov-- &et- t FoI> 88 ' 
acftv) in eum influit ad occidentem ; et profecto (fftavrcoe) 
5 advehitur hie lapis ex loco illo in Libyam (Aipvrj). Ait enim 
Scriptura (yQcupr)) sancta : Fluvius est egrediens ex Eden 
( 3 Ed6[ji) ; qai dividitur in quattuor principia (d^?) ; nomen 
unius Phison (0iacov = 0eia6v), qui circuit universam ter- 
ram Evila (Eveddr) ubi est aurum. Aurum autem illius terrae 
tobonum est. Et ibi carbunculus (avftqag) et lapis prasinus 1 . 


(V) DE LAPIDE SAPPHIRO (oanniQov = 

Sapphirus (acwmQoe = odjupeiQog) lapis quern < sic? > vo 
cant( a ) . ....... 


*Gen. 2, 10-1 2 (LXX). 

2 Desinit : PG. XL 111,^333 A ; BLAKE, 112, 3. Reliqua desunt. 
Deest etiam tractatus VI, de jaspide lapide. 


252 


D 


(Paris. Bibl Nation. Fonds Copte, 131Vfol. 89). 
<?. 6TB6 tltWNe NMFYplOO 


[&.Yt 6T6 OYNTq] 


c|f a 

Pol. 89 


eqOY6TOY 
)f . 6TB6 TIM 

fc.YW.OYTe epoq 

MFYplOC 6T6 

ne RC&.T 

NOYM'rnplON . 

10 J^NOK a.e tepgj 
nnpe 

4>H 

rfee 
M.W.OC 

15 NNttme 6Y 


m.c GYKOCW.OC 

WIN OYTC^NO 
20 M.N OYCMH 


NTWLNT 
OYHHB. 

U.6N 


wt.ee Ye NM epe 

^v. COOYN WLM.O 
OY. 6T6 

ne. 


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tt.fi 


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ultc 


netwne 
eiHY 
pc. 

epcgftHpe w. 
M.oq . 


TH 


eYe xe epe Ter 

Pw4>H WLOYTG 

epoq 


30 


35 


40 


45 


253 


D 

(Paris. Bill. Nation. Fonds Copte, 131 2 , fol. 89). 
. DE LAPIDE LYNCURIO.> ("). 


..... (et qui) * notam habet viridantem : quapropter vocatur p. 262 
lyncurius (faytQios), id est cauda( 2 ) lyncurii (AvyyiQiov). Equi- Fol> 89] 
dem miror quomodo Scriptura (ygcuptf) sancta id dixerit ; 
5<quae> lap ides pretiosos usurpans (xe&) ( 3 ) quando provi- 
debat ornatui (oV^og), decori, pulchritudinique diadematum 
regalium <et> vestium sacerdotalium, nonnullos quidem e 
notissimislapidibusmemorat, qui sunt carbunculus 
amethystus (a^eGto-ro? = dftdOvoTog), smaragdus 

10 '== afidgaydos), achates (d^dry?), beryllus 
PtfevMos), et chryso*lithus (xQvaoAivOog = ^evo-oAtflog), p. 
quomodo inter omnes lapides hyacinth i (tiatavOcus = vdxi- [Fol. 89R' 
vdog) meutionein non fecit, qui lapis est adeo pretiosus 
et mirabilis? Itaque (&are) adducimur ut credamus Scrip- 

is turam (yoaq>tf) hunc ( 4 ) appellare lyncurium 


1 Cf. P.G., t. XLIII, 337A ; BLAKE, 115, 1. 

8 otiQd, cauda , pro ofigtv urina. Cf. PLINIUS, Hist. Naf., 
37, 13, 52; 37, 2, 34-35. 

8 Intellige : lapidum pretiosorum usus praecipiens. 
* I. e., Hyacinihum. 


254 


10 


cq5. a 20 

Fol.89V] 


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matwc xe eq 
[o M.M.]i 
neq[eiNe] npoc 
[$e r&.p e]T6K 
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Ne eqxH 
rteqeme M.N 


[ON] 


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N&. 

cq 


erne 


H 


eqT 


KOYI . 


xtww.jis.oc 


NT 
JULNTOYHHB 


25 M.N 


.OY6N 

eYWLOYTe epoq 

xe aP^^ 1 ^ - 
ere II&.Y&.N NTOY 
HPT ne. OYN 


TIBtJDC. &.YW) 

OYGN K60Y&. eq 

eiMtM. 6YM.OY 

Te epoq xe 
metwc. &.YU) ON 

OY6N K60Y^ 6Y 

JULOYTC epoq 


&,YOD ON OY6N K6 
OY&, 6YWLOYTe 6 

poq 

KIOC. 


NT6C 


en&epoc 


THpq 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


8&6N GY 


M.OYTG epoq xe 


1 In manuscripto textus huius loci maxima cum difficultate 
discernitur. Uncinis includuntur litterae quas restitui posse puta- 
vimus ex versionibus parallelis, latina et iberica. 


255 


Porro hyacinthus (tictKtvOcDg .= tidxivOos) varius est aspectu. 
Quanto (nqog) enim (ydo) hunc invenies lapidem aspectu et 
colore rutilantior, tanto etiam ille idem lapis est pretiosior 
(avayxafov). Speciem refert lanae hyacinthin.ae(vatv6)i'='yd- 

5xiv6og)vel callainae (Kahhaivwv = xaMdivov). aliquantulum 
purpurascentis. Quapropter Scrip tura (yQaytf) sancta * di- p. 264 
cit; Ornatae sunt (xcooftei xooftelv) vestes sacerdotales ' Fo1 * 89 ^ 
hyacinth o (tidKivQoq) et purpura (). 
Primus quidem vocatur thalassites (OaAaaoiTTjg). Est et 

loalius qui dicitur rhodiaeus (Qcodieajg = Qddialog) qui rosei est 
coloris; et alius qui dicitur anatibos (avartj?coe) ( 2 ) ; et alius 
aquatici coloris ( 3 ) qui dicitur chauniaeus (%avviea)<;) ( 4 ) ; et 
alius qui dicitur opalus (cmnahioQ dn&hhios) ; et alius qui 
vocatur perileucos (neQiAevxios) ( 5 ). Iste quidem reperiri 

is solet in barbaric (fiaQpaQia) interiori Scythiae (Sx^Bia = 
SnvQia). Veteres (aQ^alog) totam partem (/u,^Qog) septen- 
trionalem appellare solebant * Scythiam (ZxvQia), p 264 

[Fol. 89 1 


1 Exod. 28, 5, 33. 

2 Nativus ? Textus graecus legit: vdrt/Sog. MIGNE, I. c., col. 
300, 1. 14. 

3 Goptice 61&.1UU . Glossema perobscurum. Deest apud PKYRON 
et SPIEGELBERG. De eo dicit GRUM (Diction, s. v.): meaning un- 
known. Seems to = like to colour of water , et commemorat 
hunc passum. Legendum putat : eCjei(H)^.Y(W... Sed idem ver- 
bum occurrit in nostro Epiphanio, p. 375 (British Museum Or. 
3581 A(8), 3. CRUM, Cat. No. 180) ... n8JUL6$eCTOC CTClMCfi). 
E versione iberica et e contextu sensus esse videtur : esse colo- 
ris aquatici = vert d'eau. 

* Legerem equidem : hyaenaens. Cf. PLINIUS, Hist. Nat., 37, 10, 
168. In textu graeco legitur : x a wiaTog. MIGNE, 1. c., col. 300, 1. 15. 
8 PLIN., 37, 180. 


256 


10 


tttt.*, lTOYH$ N 

fidi Npea^s. 

. M.N NCTHC 
M.N N^OYNNOC. 

M.N N*.peiec. M.N 


T6K61 6XN NTOJ9 
. M.N 


erwl 


15 


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HGI&. 

ene 

NT6CKY 
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w.epe X&.&.Y fiptw 


ene 

CHT epoq. eqo 
peq e^oYfi end 


OY&. 
C&.T neqgo e&o 
^IXN T^ne NN 

TOYe'l'H. 6TM. 


NOYCOBT. 


p&xq 


6TON 
. N6TOY . . . 


20 


25 


30 


257 

regionem quam incolunt Colchi 

<G>etae (<r>^g), Hunni (Ofiwog), Areies 

Ariani (Agtavi) ( 2 ) et ita porro usque ad fines ( 3 ) Germano- 

rum (FeQ/jiavog) et Amazonum (Aftafavee = 'Afta6vec;). 

5 jllla igitur in regione, in deserto (BQS/MX; = lg^og|interiori, 
vallis sita est quae per maximam partem Scythiae (Zxv6la) 
dehiscit : in quam vallem nemo hominum potest descendere ; 
quippe saxo (nsrQo) utrimque concluditur, ita (&ats) ut qui 
e vertice montium illorum, quasi e muro aspectuin demittat, 

10 vallem hanc cum eius tenebricosa altitudine, oculis.com- 
plecti nonpossit. Qui.. ..(*). 


1 Legendumne Neuri = Ii&.peiec? Cf. PLIN., 4, 12, 88: 
vQol. HEROD., 4, 17. 

2 Legerem equidem Alani = 'Ahavol. 

8 Verbum e verbo : usque dum pervenias supra fines.... 
4 Desinit : P.G., t. XLIII, 339 A ; BLAKE, 117, 12: 


258 - 


E. 


(Pan's. Bill Nation. Fonds Copte, 131 s ). 


Nl 


5 c&.;e&.p. M.N 

MWN. 

TtMOYN NOYtWT 

NIOY 
Ncyopft 0. 


10 


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BC TIM N&.1 H6 N 
NirM.8,. NTW.N 


. en 


BOX 


M.neqeItT 


20 


N^lNTtWOYN N 


BHN. 


M.N CY 25 


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s.. 

NiSL 


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P&.I&S. W.N 
CH. M.M B6N1X 
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THpOY 


W.M.&.Y 


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fi 


fictwq 


so 


35 


40 


45 


259 - 


E 

i 

(Paris. Bibl. Nation. Ponds Copte, 131 3 , fol. 46-50). 
<DE ENUMERATIONIBUS TRIBUUM>., 

... * ex Levi ( 1 ). Illi enim (ydg) constituerunt ludam p. 287 a 
habentem secum Issachar et Zabulon in una metatione ( 2 ). l Fol> 46R( 
Curnam ( 3 ) (yd-e) ludam hie primo loco ad (xa.ro) Orieiitem 
constituimus. Sunt omina (eviy^a = aivvypa) regni, et quia 
5gloriam <adeptus est> loco Ruben, qui patris sui thalamum 
foedaverat, sicut (pcard-) in Scripturis (yQayrf) litteris man- 
datum est ( 4 ). 

In secunda metatione constitutus est Ruben, et cum eo 
Symeon et Gad, ad (xard) litus maris (OdAaaaa) ( 5 ) ; in (xata) 

lopartibus autem Occidentis, constitutus est Ephraim et Ma- 
nasses etBeniamin in metatione una ( 6 ). Hi omnes <filii> 
Ra*chel erant: adiunxerunt autem Manassen, quandoquidem p. 287 h 
(eneidrj) exclusus est Levi ( 7 ). Deinde ad (xara) partes Aqui- f Folt 46Rb 
lonis, in quarta metatione, constitutus est Dan primus : 

15 post eum Aser et [Njephthali ( 8 ). 


1 Cf. P.G., t. XLIII, col. 350 B et seq. ; BLAKE, 181, 20. 

2 Cf. Num. 2, 3-7. 

8 TBG II&.1 hie interrogativo modo sumendum esse putamus. 
4 Gen. 35, 22 ; 49, 4 ; I Par. 5, 1. 
6 Cf. Num. 2, 10-14. 

6 Cf. Num. 2, 18-22. 

7 Cf. Num. 2, 33. 

8 Cf. Num. 2, 25-29. 


260 - 


eaox xe 

rime fixeYei eq 

THJ NM.MAY. 


nei 


Ke&epoc 


n 


10 


X6K&.C 

55.M.&.Y NOYP&.N 

fire NjgH 

. GTBG 
NCtWN 


15 


ON 


pecic. Teitce 

MC 


20 


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ice &M.OC . 


25 CJ>Y2^H ^ITWL ROY 

cilH a *ec&.3Ne Enxoeic. 


POYBHN 


M.fCNCttK| CYM.6 

: e'l'TA, 10Y 
. M.N 

W.N iiKeceene 


mtvcH<t> 


cfhre 


2s.eYe'i ON winei 


ee 


XH NOY(WT XN 

P&.N cfi^Y: 
exfi 


pecic 


N 


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Ne M.M.OC 
xoeic . 


n 
ON 


30 


35 


enopxoY e 
BOX exH cfiTe. 40 


nptt)c 45 

NCYP&.N. e&ox xe 


50 


55 


-261 - 

Quoniam vero cum illis constitutum Levi non repperimus, 
cognovimus in hac etiam parte (ft(>o<;) accommodari non 
posse lapidum seriem, nisi forte sublato nomine aliquo fi- 
liorum Israel. Itaque hanc etiam praetermisimus. 
5 Cum au tern etseptimamdivisionem(<5Mzfge(ng = dtaiQeaio) in- 
spexissemus hanc quoque reliquimus, <ut> quae cum lapidi- 
bus non congruat (av/MpcDveiv). Haecenim ex praecep to Domini 
numerata est secundum (xard) princip es (aQ%(ov) tribuum (<pvAtf). 
* Nempe in ea Ruben constitutus est primus, post eum Sy- p. 288 a 

lomeon, deinde (eha) ludas et Issachar cum reliquis ( 1 ), annu- [ po1 - 46Vb ] 
merando ad Joseph tribus (<pvhifj) duas, quoniam Ephraim et 
Manasses constituti sunt separatim in prin'cipatibus (aQxtf) 
duobus ( 2 ), ita ut (eftore) hoc etiam loco omitteretur Levi. 
Neque modum repperimus componendi lapides cum (JCQCD? 

is = ngdg) illorum nbminibus, cum <aliquot> praetermissa f ue- 
rint et tribus ((pvAtf) una in duo nomina divisa sit. 

Pervenimus ad octavam divisionem (dieQe- 
ote = diaiQeai?) quae perscripta est in li- 
bro Numerorum (agiO/tos) sicut praecep it Dominus 


1 Cf. Num. 1, 5-10. 

2 Cf. Num. 1, 10. 


- 262 - 


J^qxooc fidi WUMY 

CfiH b *CHC 

FoI.46V?] 


M.ne 
pnf. TeiKeoYei 
w.neN<teNf c ec 
cgonq W.N Neitw 
Ne : eBOx xe N 


10 


BHN Nwjopn. M.N 

CYWietMN 
IOYX8S.C : RJLN 

eic&je&p. W.N NKO 


15 


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e'i Eitem^ 

C&.&.T T61K6 OYl 

. . &.NGI exfi 


20 


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pl^WLOC : 

25 noYec^ Sin 


NN 


pONOM.lw NN6T 


30 


NOY 


tT . 

tfefifc 


35 


W.N mm 


[Fol.47R] 


40 


B6 


CH. 


45 


. W.N 


xe ON 

N2V.6Y 
El. &.YCD Itt)CH4> 6Y 

x'iHne w.w.oq N 
cen cN8cY 

pMW. . WLN 

CH . 

KeoYei. a^Nei e 
fw.eaw.HTe fi 


50 


55 


-263 - 

edixitque Moy*ses principibus (agxcov) tribuum (9^77) ut p. 288 b 
explorarent Terrain Promissionis C). Neque hanc repperimus [ Fo1 - 46V "] 
congruentem cum lapidibus, quoniam Ruben numeratus est 
primus, post eum Symeon et ludas cum Issachar et reli- 

5quis( 2 ). Levi autem rursus non memoratur hoc loco. 

Hac etiam omissa, transivimus ad nonam divisionem (diai- 
QeaiQ=diaiQeaig) eamque investigavimus, quae est in libro Nu- 
merorum (agiO/too), ex praecepto Domini. Constituti suntprin- 
cipes (&QX<W) tribuum (yvhtf), quibus terra haereditaria (K 

wvopia) daretur quam quisque sortitus esset (xArjQovofieiv 
p ariter (ararct-) cum lapidibus non comperientes in con*sequen- p. 289 a 
tia (ctKovhovQia = axoAovOia) compositum iri - inyenimus enim l Fo1 ' 47R *1 
ludam primum constitutum, post hunc Symeon et Beniamin 
cumEphraim et Manasseatque Zabulon, post hunc Issachar, 

isdeinde (eha) Aser cum [NJephthali, et rursus tribum (yvAtf) 
Levi non comperimus ( 3 ), atque loseph iterate numera- 
tus est propter Ephraim et Manasse hanc etiam 
praetergressi (naQdyeiv), incidimus in decimam divisio- 
nem (di&tQeaiQ diaiQsaig) quam itidem comperimus 


1 Cf. Num. 13, 2 et seq. ; 32, 8 ; Deut. 1, 22. 

2 Cf. Num. 13, 5-16. 
8 Cf. Num. 34, 19-28. 


264 - 


M.M.OC . 

&.N. 6T6 TM T6. NT6 

peqcwiOY efiwjHpe 

W.E1HX ntfl J&tWY 

5 /!!/ /? l^l'PffltfAt 

wtiw vv^vl 1 mmj 

NBemajiuN erpeq 
ep w.eqTOOY. M.N 
NC&. xevei. W.NN 

CW)q I(WCH<J> W.N 
10 28J&OYMMN. WLN 

Nctwq e'ic^^iLp . 

TT & ^ I?T 
ll(V.l b 1 

T 


15 


eqo 


[FoL47Rb] 


eqo N^e COYON HIM. 
ere n$jHpe ne NT 


20 


piew.cc. 


m*. 

xe 


25 ((OJUL ne ef peccsjtwne 
ecjgoNq firfi Te'i 


ovei. 


OYOI exrc fM.es 
wieNTOYe 

peCLC : 

ne. 

Ml M.ODYCHC 6T 

peY^^e P&.TOY 

TM.NT CNOOYCe 

CO M. 
UTOOY 


K6CO. 


ef 


etc uieN eccgoon 


nex^q 


OY 

xw. necuiOY 

CYM.etWN M.N 

ei . W.N 


M.N Be 

oi 
NGN 


N 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


cq a 

[Fol. 47 


55 


-265- 

non .congruentem, quae <facta> est cum filiis Israel bene- 
diceret Moyses, quando Beniamin constituit quartum post 
Levi O, post eum Joseph cum Zabuldn, post eum Issachar et 
Gad, qui ortus est e secunda ancilla ( 2 , praepostere ultimum: 
5 *deinde (ehd) Dan cum [NJephthali et Aser postremum om- p. 289 b 
nium, qui alterius fuit ancillae filius ( 3 ). Deficiente autem [ F i- 47Rb l 
numero (aQidpog), nam Symeon mm commemoratur, fieri 
non potest ut haec divisio (dtdigeaiQ = diaiQsaig) congruerit. 
Itaque hac etiam omissa, gressum fecimus ad undecimam 

10 divisionem (dieQeais = diaiQeais) quam invenimus ubi Moyses 
decrevit ut duodecim tribus ((pvAtf) consisterent, sex tribus 
((pvArj) inmonteGarizim(/!Laget> = FaQi^eiv) et sex reliquae in 
monte Hebal (Pa ipdX), sicut scrip turn est in Deuteronomio ( Tev- 
TeQ(Qvo[ii(ov = AevreQov6[tiov)(*). Quae divisio (didiQeoi? = diai- 

15 geais) hoc ordine (xard-) f acta est. Dixit : Stant in monte Gari- 
zim (ragei^etv =ra.Qielv) ad benedictionem, Symeon cum Levi, 
ludas * cum Issachar, et loseph cum Beniamin. ( 5 ). Primos p. 290 a 
enim (yd(j) constituit filios uxorum liberarum, praeter Ruben I FoL 47V *J 


1 Lineae 2-6, cf. Deut. 33, 6-25. 

2 Cf. Gen. 30, 9-11. 

3 Cf. Gen. 30, ,13. 

* Cf. Deut. 27, 12-13. 
6 Deut. 27, 12. 


10 


15 


20 


25 


BHN 


TOY Nrfl 3POYBHN 
M.N r&.& . M.H &.C 
CHp. M.N 2&.BOY 
MWN. M.N e<J>^s. 
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fi^i TCI 
eTeq 
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riON. SLnen^e n 
c&x GT^CCG W.W.OG 


epoc 

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pecic re. 
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epe COOY NP&.N 

NGNTOYeiH 

mcecooY 


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eCTOO 

CH&.Y 


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^N TCNTG 
NNOYB : 


266 
*oit 


N 


NOYB. 


$6 


T 


6TB6 

(WT 

TOC. 6TB6 

coo Y^ W.W-OC . fiq 
N8.)cwn epoq 

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OYM -&e 4>Yc 
c^aui eoY^. NOY 

(S)f NNGlp^N. 

tye epoq ne 

TtWC. 

CBOX 


NOY 


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ne 
rmepoc NOY 


so gq b 

[Fol.47V] 


35 


40 


45 


50 


55 


- 267 - 

solum. Delude stant Ruben cum Gad, Aser, Zabulon et 
[NJephthali ("). Non convenit haec altera selectio (alqeaiQ) ( 2 ) 
cum quadruplici ordine ( 3 ) rationalis (hoysiov). Animum non in- 
venimus earn in ordinem disponendi (rdaaeiv) (*). Deinde, hanc 
5 divisionem (didiQeaig diaiQeoi?) considerantes, quae unde- 
cima est, in duas partes ([tdgog) descriptam, dum sex nomina 
sunt in uno monte et sex reliqua in altero, earn profecto con- 
gruentem repperimus cum numero ( B ) nominum quae inscripta 
erant in duobus smaragdis (o/tagaKro? = afidgaydog) insertis 

10 in duobus... ( 6 ) aureis, quae erant * ex utraque parte colli p. 290 b 
summi sacerdotis (dg^ege^g) connexa vitta aurea et hyacin- l Fo1 - 47Vv l 
thina (vaxivQiyog) quo modo (ttard-) edixerat <Deus> ut dis- 
ponerentur nomina filiorum Israel incisa in duobus illis lapi- 
dibus smaragdis (0 a/j,a.Qa%Tos=ff/j,dQa'ydis), quoniam una sma- 

I5ragdus (a/tctQaxros = a^aQaydo^), uti erat circumclusa, non 
poterat duodecim nomina cap ere. Etiamsi (x&>) ex <rei>na- 
tura (yvai =(p'6ffei) haec nomina in uno eodemque <lapide> ins- 
cribipotuissent, profecto (ndv-cox;) conveniens non fuisset, ut 
<aliqua> significatio interesset inter ea <nomina> quae ad 

20 dexteram essent et quae ad sinistram. Itaque in parte 


1 Deut. 27, 13. 

a Profecto legendum : divisio 

8 reTQaarixta vel rerQdon^ovl Exod. 28, 17. 

* Interpretatio incerta. Legimus )Uin6Ii^6[6]nC&,K cum elisione 
rov e. Totus hie locus videtur insanabilis. 

6 Textus^lhabet : fum*\lapide (tWNe) ; sed profecto cum antiqua 
versione latina legendum 'est ODH, numerus. Ceterum ordo verbo- 
rum pessime perturbatus est. 

6 Coptice &.p&.. Glossema perobscurum, sed quod vix aliud 
significari potest quam duo illi uncini, graece aajtidlanai, de qui- 
bus Exod. 28, 13 ; 39, 16-17. Alii sensus apud GRUM, Diction., sub 
verbo. 

7 Cf. Exod. 28, 9 ; 39, 6-7, 


-268 - 


6Tpe NTOY61H 

wjoon 55.M.OC. ere 
tee M.N 
OY 


BOYp 


6BOX 


cqa\. a 

[FOU8RB1 
10 


ni 


MLdc epoq xe fiTk.Y 
CWLOY fcHT ert 


is 


20 


NT*. 

TOY 6^ UTOOY N 
. xooc 
ne 

WLff 2^Yei. M.N IOY 
M.N NKOOY6 
N 


25 ne eTecwiH. 
nzs.dv.oc eTav.se 


OYBHY ef pSYXO 


oc xe eqejstwne 


30 


rei^e ON win 

ffNH 


: M.N 

. M.6N N 
KOOY6 eT 
TOY & nTOOY N 


qc^OYop 
ptww.e NIKS. eTfiq 


CH3 THpOY 


W.OG : 
utfi 
xe 


ft 


nexa^q 
THpq 
eqe 


55. 


ftTOOY NNGH 
T&.YCOTOY 6T6 

ne 
55.neYM.as, 


35 


45 


cqEJ 

[Fol.48 


50 


55 


- 269 - 


dextera erant <aut sinistra> eo modo (xarti-) quo montes 
Garizim (FaQsi^Biv = FaQi^elv) et Hebal (Fai^AX) stant ad 
dexteram et ad sinistram ex adverse * Jericho, ad (xard) P- 291 a 
orientem prope Galgala ( A ), ubi dicitur benedictus fuisse IFoL 48R ^ 
5populus (Aao'g) Israel ( 2 ). Sicut enim qui in monte Garizim 
(FaQst^eiv = FaQi^siv) consistebant, Symeon, Levi, ludas et 
reliqui ( 8 ) dicebant; Benedictus' qui facit voluntatem Domi- 
ni , exaudiebaturque vox populi (Aao'g) stantis in campo, cui 
innuebant ut diceret : Fiat, fiat ; ita (Hard-) etiam ex 

io adverse, qui ad Ruben pertinebant et Gad et Zabulon et 
[NJephthali et reliqui, stantes in monte Hebal (FaipdX) ( 4 ) 
dicebant; Maledictus homo qui non steterit iis quotquot 
scrip ta sunt in * libro Legis (voftog) , et dicebat omnis popu- p.- 291 b 
lus (Aa 6$) : Fiat, fiat ( 6 ), quod interpretari solent (eQpeveve I Fo1 - 48V "1 

15 =eQ/j,rjve'6eiv) : Amen . Etenim (yd(j) duorum montium inter- 

.pretatio (egpevevs = eQ/tyvstieiv) est : Garizim: mons libe- 

ratorum, . nempe ereptio[ne] a loco peregrinationis suae. 


1 Cf. Jos. 4, 19. 

2 Cf. Jos. 8, 33, 34. 
8 Cf. Deut. 27, 12. 

4 Cf. Deut. 27, 13. 

6 Cf. Deut. 27, 15-26. 


- 270 - 


RTOOY 

ecg&.YBO*.q. xe n 

TOOY NN6T<90Y 

GIT. &.YCW NeYN&, 

5 KG. &.-'OlN6 

WLeeve 31* NGT 

frrerp*. 
<t>H. Nceopx 
&.N. 

10 

C'lC NN 

xe w.ej9^.K UTO 
OY er^iTOYtwc N 

C1K6MA. M.N CY 
15 GJ. T&.1 6T 

epOC N^l CY 


nxoeic 
20 egOYfi epoq. <,Yt 

nU.^. NT&.C61 6 

BOX 


CTlE *plTHC 

IFol.48V] 25 


XN 
gYM-OYTG 

jutSc TenoY xe 
noxic. oYnox'ic ec 


ON. 3N 
6Y 

JULOYTG epoc 


30 


. NT&.Y'fr 

pine xe 

p'ii.. ene'ixH CJ>Y 

cei . eYJULOYTe en 

TOOY NCWW.HP 

xe CCWW.HP 

M.acY N 

encq 
ne 


en 


TOOY 


T3JCOYXOY 

ne e 


NOY 


BYMN. 6B02S. 


ccwp . NTepeccgu? 
ntii 


neYOYoi NI wen 
pec&YTepoc 


35 


40 


45 


50 


55 


- 271 

Mons autemHebal vertitur : mons inaniumet dolores earum ( J ). 

Existimabant autem quidam ex iis qui Scripturam (yQayfy. 

explicant non adhibita diligentia, ii praesertim qui pertinent 

ad haeresim (egeais = algeaig) Samaritanorum (Za^aQirriq), 

5<Garizim> ( 2 ) fortasse montem esse adiacentem Sicemae et 
Sichem, cui^vicina est Sichar, ( 3 ) urbs (nohi$) Samaritanorum 
in quam confugit Dominus et unde egressamulierSama*rita- p. 292 a 
na, invenit Dominum sedentem supra puteum ( 4 ). Sicima nunc ^ FoL 48V *1 
vocatur Neapolis (NednoAig), urbs (noAig) opulentissima ex iis 

loquae sunt in Palaestina, quae tune dicebatur ludaea et Sama- 
ria ( 5 ). Nomen vero Samaria datum est ei, quia (eneidrj) natu- 
raliter (ytiaei) mons ille, dicebatur Somer (2a)^Q). Scilicet 
Somer ille filium habuit cui nomen erat Somoron ( 6 ). Exinde 
igitur mons Som^r dictus est ad (xard) huius nominis congruen- 

istiam (aovAou0ta=d^oAov0t), quae praesertim ((ji&Xiatd) con- 
firmationem accepitper eos quiBabylonem a Nabuchodono- 
sor ducti sunt. Qiiando enim accidit captivitas (exftaAtoaia 

convenerunt seniores jtgeoSih'eog Israel 


1 Forsan legendum : NeY l f'N&,acKe = parturientium. 

2 Supplendum videtur e latina versione. 

3 Cf. lud. 9, 7. 

4 Cf. Joh. 4, 1 et seq. 

5 Gt.Epiph. Haer., 1, 9,1 : ttyyfiv... rrjv vvv'lovdalav 


( 6 ) Ibid. : exahetTo ds xal r6 OQOS ev&a Ixa&doOriaav Sm^Qaov^ &(jia 
b teat Zw^riQ, dnd aq^alov nvdg HcopdQcw, vlov SCO^Q } oflTco rov dvd@6g 
. r .Hv d ofaoe 6 EW^QCW vios evfa dvdgdg r&v and 


-272 - 


. 6TG 

cftE b *Ne. WIN ntceceene 
FoU8Vb] ec&pa, IIOYHHB 

W.N 
5 BYTepoc . 


: ef peq 

TNNOOY 

w,e ficewiooc 
10 xlOY^aJlak.: xe 

K6.C NNC 


15 


20 


25 


epoq 
s.qxooY 
n we 

T6 HOYq N6. NTO 
OY N^e^NOC . NT6 
POYU.OOC ^UL ft 

S5.H1HX. ere 

NG NKOYXIM 

cue . 

OC . 

. 6YNT&.Y 


neTepe 
NOG. 


neqTOjg : 


(|TepOYl X6 N 

ce<5.ooc 


30 


xe C&.U.&.PG 
ej98s.YM.OYTe e 
poq xe nefpoeic. 
HGYpoeic r&.p tie 


*M.OY1 M.N 


extw 


OY : 


rfi nw.HHtge ri 
TOOTOY enTH 
pq w.M.HNe. 

XOOY Ntfl NpODM.e 
eTM.M.cY. NOYH 

pecBYTepoc e 

B02V.S1TOOTOY 


. xe 
eqet^e 

n 


er 


&e RTXKO ne e 


35 


40 cqr a 

[Fo].49R 


45 


50 


55 


- 273 - 

qui cumEsdra* erant aliique. Esdras sacerdos et quidam alii p. 292 b 
seniores (nQeaftvrsQog) suaserunt (yca^aaAfi')Nabuchodonosor I Foh 48V "1 
ut homines mitteret qui ludaeam incolerent, ne terrain solitu- 
dinemconversa,interiret.Illeigitur eorum consilium suscipiens, 

5 homines misit e gentibus (eOvosgdvog) sibi subditis, qui ter- 
ram Israel incolerent; hi sunt Cudaei (/ow<5ta/o)e)<et>Cuthaei 
(KovOeog) ( x ). Qui ascenderunt secum habentes idola (eidcoAcov 
= sWcoAov) sua quae in suis quaeque finibus gens (&QVOQ = 
80vo$) coluerat.( 2 ) Postquam igitur advenerunt ut terrain ha- 

10 bitarent, voeati sunt Samaritani ; Samari<tanus> enim solet 
vocari custos : terrain quippe (yd.Q) custodiebant. Deinde 
vero cum * leones et pardi (ndgdafas) et ursi (age| = aQKtog) P- 293 a 
in eos irrupissent( 3 ), ita ut (&are)~ex. iisplurimi prorsus inter- 
irent cotidie, miserunt isti homines seniorem (siQsapfaBQos) 

isaliquem ex suis ad Nabuchodonosor, ut copiam eis daret 
recedendi ex ilia terra, quod a feris (Oygtov) perimerentur : 


1 Gf . IV Reg. 17/24. 

2 Gt IV Reg. 17, 29. 

8 Gf. IV Reg. 17, 25, 26. 


-274 - 


ne 


6TM.M.&.Y ritfi ni 

5 H . N&.BO Y 


NenpecBYTepoc 

kqXNOYOY X6 6Y 
10 N^eoj^SL^OWL N 


: NTO 

OY 
ne 

15 xe eqcoYTtwc 

xe 

6T 

pe 
cqf b *oc 


25 


SUMO 

JIS.OC WLfCNOYTG . 

N&.q MOY 
xtwtwwie NTB n 

HOW.OC . 


&.qnooNeq 


fi 


30 


NGN 

M.N NKOY^MOC 


nOYHHB.: 


35 


&.N eecxp^. ne 
TOYW.OYT6 epoq 


40 


eTe nw ne 


noY 
HHB. NTepeqei 45 


H6 NS.Y WLM.vTe 


50 


nrvnoc 

XOGIC 
WLtWYCHC 

*TOOY mini, 


n 


55 


[Fol.49\! 


fi 


275 - 

nempe (ydg) mirabantur Israelem hoc loco habitare potuisse. 
Nabuchodonosor autem arcessitos seniores (ngeap^rego^) in- 
terrogavit quomodo futurum esset ut illi in terra habitare 
possent. Isti autem prudens ei consilium dederunt dicentes : 
5 Fieri nonpotesfrut gentes (edvog = edvog) hunc locum inco- 
lant * nisi (eie/j,^rsi=el ptf ri) custodiant Legem (VO^OQ) Do- p. 293 b 
mini ( L ). Dederunt autem ei librum Legis (vopos). Ille autem l Fol> 49Rb ] 
librum sibi servavit, atque in alio describi<curavit>, quern 
Samaritanis dedit misitque Cudaeis (KovdiaicDs) et Cuthaeis 

wKovOaioe) per Esdram sacerdotem : non loquor de Esdra qui 
vocatur Salathiel, qui proximus est Zorobabel, filius lecho- 
niae. Iste autem Esdras sacerdos, cum illuc ascendisset, at- 
tulit eis Pentateuchum (yievrarevxaos = yievrdrev^o?) solum, 
scrip turn litteris antiquis (aq^aioyv = a.Q%aZov), ea (nard) 

15 forma (rvnos) quam dedit Dominus Moysi in * monte p. 294 a 
Sinai. Earn vero formam (r^o?) filii Hebraeorum ('E^Qalog) f FoL 49Va l 


1 Cf. IV Reg. 17, 26. 


-276 


oc. WLOYTG epoq 

Xe &.CCHN6 6T6 

naa ne 


TCNOY 
ere oYefi &.Y 

COY M.M.^Y fUfl N 


10 M.6. 


IITY 


noc 


15 


nen 

HTY * 

noc a.e NNGY 

T6NOY e 

e 
POOY xe COD &. 

ElpHNOC . 


20 


KTY 
nOC NHHCCH 
NOC. IWJ 
25 OH 


NTcpe 
xe ei 

TB^BYXODN. 


fiTepcq 
entwpx 
xe 


K&.C 


THC nti nre 

NOC 

6TB6 XG NTO 

OY 


ntwtwne NNec 


THC 


wlnTYnoc. 

M.OC 


N 


K&.C 

eqnopx 
necnep 


Enei 


BOX NT^lCTtt) 
6TB6 


30 

cq5L b 

[Fol.49V] 


35 


40 


45 


50 


55 


-277 - - 

vocare solent Assene (Aaayvs) (*), id est incisam. Scriptu- 
rae enim (ydg) quas mine habent Hebraei ('EpQaios) et reli- 
qui eorum libri non script! sunt ad (%ard) formam (-nkog) prio- 
rem quae incisa est in tabulis (nMg) ; formam (rvnog) autem 
5 scripturarum suarum nunc vocare solent Somaeirenos (Zco- 
ftaeiQrjvos) ( 2 ). Samaritani autem formam (r^nos) habent Nes- 
senos ( 3 ) (Nyj0ar]vog) quae in tabulis (nM) erat tempore illo. 

Cum autem ascendisset Esdras Babylona velletque * p. 294 b 
secludere Israelem ne forte permisceretur genus (yvos) I FoL 49V 6 ] 

10 Abraham cum Samaritanis, quippe qui custodirent et ipsi 
Legem (v6fjiog), immutavit scripturam Legis (vo/jioq), non 
autem Prophetarum (nQoytfTrjg). <His suam> formam (r^ko?) 
reliquit, solius autem Legis (vfyog) scripturam mutavit, ut 
seclusum permaneret semen (an^d) Abraham. 

15 Veruni (dAAa) nos cum in hunc locum oratio perduxis- 
set, historiam (larcoQia = laroqia) explicavimus propter 


1 Latina versio antiqua: deession. Iberica: diesinon. 
a Latina versio : Somahirenus. Iberica : Somoronos. 
8 Latina versio : deessinon. Iberica : desinon. 


-278 


&YC1C. 


ne 


THC. e&.Yxi mi 

BOXN Ctt) 
. OY&. 6BO*. 

NjsjHpe NNG 


M.N Ne<j>aupec 
10 CMOC. 


n 


15 OY WIN UTOIIOC 

xe cuuj&Hp . NTS 
POYCI xe ON 


NOC NTficNXO 

20 OY eTpeYpoeic 


re epooY 

. ere 
ne NeTpo 

25 GIG . GB02s. XG NGY 

poeic enK^a. 
na.1 
w. 


GTfie xe 
ne 

eNeCBOOY. JULft 

NOM.OC. 

plNOY 

ne YP&.N : 


30 


ne 


6TBHH 


TOY 


6Y 


eipe SLnno 

M.OC 55.nNOYT6 


epe 

XtWK 6BOX 

^ en^e. 

6YN 

wlnei 

CM.OT. NTepOY 

wie r&.p N^I ne 
OYHHB &nei 
CJTOOY N^e-&NOC 

N 


NNl 
K&.T&, 
TeCBtO WLttNOY 

Te . &.Y) ne 


35 


40 


cqe b 

[Fol.50R*] 


45. _ 


50 


55 


07Q 

ii U 


argumentum (fytoOvoig = 

Samaritan! autem inceperunt hoc nomen ducere a S6m6r (*), 
<qui fuit>unus e * filiis Chananaeorum (XavaveoQ=Xavavaiog) p. 295 a 
et Pheresaeorum (0aigeaaaiog ^sQE^alog) antequam I FoL 50Ra J 

5 Abraham habitavit in terra, montemque et locum (ronos) 
appellarunt S6mer. Postquam vero ascenderunt et aliae gen- 
tes (sQvoQ = edvoo) quas diximus, ut terram custodirent, voca- 
ti sunt Samaritani (Ta^a^tT^g), id est custodes, quippe custo- 
diebant terram. 

10 Quae res quidem habet et aliam considerationem (dewQia) : 
qiiandoquidem Legis (vdftoe) praecepta observarunt,congruen- 
ter suo nomine vocati sunt. De iis dicit Scriptura (yecuprj) : 
Manserunt facientes Legem (VO^OQ) Dei, et adorantes * ido- p. 295 b 
la (idoAcw = eWwhov) sua. (2). Id quomodo fieri poterit? I Fol - 50Rb J 

15 Argumentum (vnoQvais = ^yioBeaig) hanc habet formam. 
Quando enim (yd(j) cognoverunt sacerdotes quattuor gen- 
tium (e6voQ = eOvog) illarum, ascendisse Esdram sacerdotem 
qui abominabatur idola (id&hov = eidcoAov) secundum 
(xard) praeceptum Domini, atque si deprehensus quis fuisset 


i Cf. Ill Reg. 16, 24. 
a IV Reg. 17, 41. 


-280 - 


eqtgcge 

2v.tt)N . KNOJULOC 
T 

cpoq 
. &.Yqei 


10 


NHl NM. 

.&, eTxoce : &.Ytfi) 

M.M.OOY 
OYMA Ntfi)n 
ftTOOY NF&. 

. neq 

TOOY 


15 


M.GN NT 


[Fol.50V>] 


fiNipe 


rex. 


25 


NN 


T 

en 

TOOY : cY(M 
HM.^ 6TOYJ90 

on N^HTq 

ON 

YB6 TOOY N 


30 


eniHBf 
new. 


epHC : &.YO) 
npnc 


eYeiopew. 
NC&. HTOOY : 
gpe Terp&.<|>H 


XCWK efiox ec 
xtfim.ui.oc. xe 
&,Y(Jt&) eYe'ipe 

NOftlOC UlnNOY 
T6. ^.Ytt) 6YOY 


N 

TOOY C60 N&.T 
COOYN, X6 N6Yel 


35 


40 


45 


50 


[F01.50V*] 


idolis (eido)^DV= e'tdcoAov) serviens, Legem (v6po<;) iubere eum 
lapidari (*), celeriter abstulerunt idola (sidwXwv =? el- 
dayAov) e domibus locorum excelsorum et absconderunt ea 
in latebris in monte Garizim. <Erant autem> quattuor 

5 idola (eidwAow = e'tda)Aov) sicut (tcard-) audivimus : Babyloriii 
autem homines occultaverunt S6ch6th * Banith ; homines p. 296 a 
vero Chuth occultaverunt Niregel ; homines Emath occul- .[Foi. 50V b ] 
taverunt Asima, et Eudii (Evdifoe = Etidux;) occultaverunt Ne- 
bastharthach et Sephpharouen ( 2 ). Atque persuaserunt (niOe 

10 = rieiOeiv) Samaritanis (ZafiaQhys) ut in monte orarent. Et in 
quocumque loco sunt, versus montem se convertere solent ad 
orandum. Solent enim qui sunt ad Occidentem orare ad Orien- 
tem, qui sunt ad Septentrionem orare ad Austrum, qui suiit 
ad Austrum orare ad Septentrionem, montem respicientes ; 

i5<adeoque> Scriptura (ygcuptf) completa est quae dixit; Man- 
serunt facientes Legem (vofjtog) Dei, et * adorantes idola (eidco- p. 296 b 
Ao>v=eida)Aov) sua ( 3 ). Etenim (xat ydg) etiamsi nesciantilli (Foi..50Rj y 


1 Cf. Deut. 13, 6-10. 

2 Cf. IV Reg. 17, 30, 31. 
8 IV Reg. 17, 41. 


- 282 - 


n 


OY 
ne GT 


Terpc<j>H: 

TGl^YUO 
TM N 


10 ne N&.N eTpeN 

C9&.X6 epoq 6T 
BG TW.NTCNO 

oYce wL4>YXH 
ex^S. RTOOY 
15 fir&.pei2eiN . 
WIN RTOOY firaul 


erects) M.MOC 


cic. slnei^pie 
M.OC. 


N 


TeiWLlNG . 6N6 
TeNCeWLOY$9f 


NeTNCeCOOYN 


M.N nxeYTepo 
NCWWIION : 


20 


25 


30 


- 283 - 

idola (eidcoAcov = e'tdcoAov) sua ibi latere in terra, fieri tamen 
((UA<f)nonpotestutmentiatur Scriptura (yQcuptf). Et haec sunt 
quae, congruenter (%ard) huic argumento (finoOvais = vno- 
), res nos adduxit ut diceremus de duodecim tribubus 
in monte Garizim et in monte Hebal, quod attinet ad 
(vard) modum quo huius numeri (aQtO^dg) divisio (didiQeais = 
diaiQeaig) fa eta est. Itaque decipiuntur (anavra= anarav) hi 
qui non accurate Scripturas (yQayfj) scrutantur, neque reli- 
quam Scripturam (ygcuptf) norunt cum Deuteronomio (Aev- 
10 rsQovapiov = Aevregovoftiov), dum ( x ) 


1 Desinit : P.O., t. XLIII, 364 A ; BLAKE, 191, 18-19. 


284 - 


(British Museum Or. 3581A (8). CRUM, Catal 180 1 , p. 70B.) 

cqS *fc.omoN<te a^Ntctw ricum NTULG^JULNTOYG NXi&.ipecic ewi- 
M.M.OC 


pecic TM eTcgoon M.HN&.Y NT^WLCWYCHC I*KXHPONOJIS.I^ 5 

N^pOYBHN JULNr^a^. JULNTH^Mje WL^Y^-H W-W-^N^CCH ^l- 

netcpo u.mopx&.NHc TeiKeorei xe ON uLneN^me W.M.OC 

eCTOOM.6 


f *NNeqcNHY eiwLHTei JULHOXIC NJULJUL^, NOYoa ^Yt Nctwjge 10 


nl neon CN^Y eTpeq^tw ^rmYWiHTe es.NKt NCCWN 

NGN 
M.OYJ9T 


-285 - 

F 
(British Museum Or. 3581 A (8). CRUM, Catal 180 1 , p.70B). 

<DE ENUMERATIONIBUS TRffiuuM> ( 1 ). 


* Proinde (homov) reliquimus undecimam divisionem (dmi- p. 299 
Qeais=diatQeaig) quae non potest connect! cum rational! (Act>- 
yiov = Aoyiov) quadruplici ordine composite in duobus lapi- 

5dibus smaragdinis (a^agateroQ = a/taQaydoi;) qui sunt in super- 
humerali (enoDfiils). 

Convertimus autem nos ad scrutandum duodecimam divi- 
sionem (dtdiQeaiQ = diatQeais), ilia quae locum habuit quando 
Moyses dedit haereditatem (xArjQovojuid) Ruben cum Gad, et 

10 dimidiae tribui (yvAij) Manasses ad ripam lordanis ( 2 ). Illam 
alteram vero non invenimus convenientem 


* fratribus suis, nisi (el fitfri) urbes (n6Aig) ad p. 300 

habitandum, et agros propter iumenta eomm ( 3 ). Quin immo 
15 (dAAd) nee Symeonem invenimus accepisse haereditatem 
Qovopia), sed (dAAct) dederunt eiultimum in media 
ludae et Beniamin, quandoquidem (c&g) ei permiserant (avv- 
Xa)Qsiv=avy%Q)Qeiv) fratres ambo ut maneret in medio eorum. 
Derelinquentes ea quae diximus de duodecima divisione 
20(didiQeais = diaigeai?) processimus ad decimam tertiam 
divisionem (di&iQsau; = dialgeaig) ; forsan . . .... 


1 Quae sequuntur desunt in versionibus latina et ib erica. 

2 Cf. Jos. 13, 15-32. 
8 Jos. 14, 4. 


-286'- 


(Institut fran^ais d'Archeologie Orientate du Gaire) 


nume 


TN? 1 


fiNe4>opoc : 

2s!i eoYN eYdow. 55. 


fc 


10 


NTIKON JCW 

ne N&.C 

HOCT02S.OC. 


N 


15 


w.nppo ne 

. WIN T6KK 


20 CTe 

epe 


T6 


flpE 
neq 


25 


N 
rix&xe. 


fi 


[N6Te]NOYC TH 

[poY] 


[M.OC] xe e'ic 
[ne] Mt NHTCN 


THpc 

NT6 

XI THY 
TN <N>^ONC : 

cgnHpe xe ne 
xe eveme exfi 


uneitsme n&i exe 
n^^^THc ne. 

IUJ NT^YXl NOY 


Tq : 


. cee'ine 


30 


35 


40 


45 


- 287 - 


(Institut Frangais d'Archeologie Orientate du Caire) 
. DE LAPIDE ACHATE>. 


... * et primitias (arca^) tributorum (yoqog) quae condu- p. 357 a 
cunt ad potentiam regni, et ad evertendum imiltitudinem 
castrorum (naQe^o^rf) hostilium. Haec tribus (yvhtf) suc- 

Scessionem (diadco%?] = diadoxtf) spiritualem (nve 
ab apostolis (anoaroXog) habuit. Illi qui ministrant 
= diaxovelv) mensis (rgdneZa) viduarum Cc^e), regi Christo 
ministrant (diaxcovei = diaxovelv) et ecclesiae (enxAriaia) 
sanctae, quae filia est Aser divitis, ut fert (%ard) huius no- 

lOmen ( a ), cupientes morsum hostium retundere, secundum (Kara) 
potestatem (egovata) quam <Christus> suae sponsae dedit 
et omnibus qui ad earn pertinent, dicens : Ecce dedi vobis 
potestatem (el-ovoia) procalcandi serpentes et scorpiones * p. 357 b 
omnemque potestatem hostilem ut nihil vobis nocere possit ( 3 ). 

15 Minim est ad Aser referri considerationem (OECOQIO) huius 
lapidis, qui est achates (d^dr^?) ; quae in illo secundum (xard) 
historiam (laro)Qia=laroQid) in <Lege> veteri (nahaia) com- 


1 Cf. BLAKE, p. 151, 13. In versione latina hie passus non legitur. 

2 Tityy = dives. 
8 Luc. 10, 19. 


- 288 - 


J&JUI.OOY 


T1KON. 
6BOX N T6KK 
5 2iHCfo.: 


. 6TB6 


Ntsme. 
10 GTG NToq ne 


CTO 


eqfiHY GSSLH 


NT 


pe. qxtw 

SS&&.OC GTBHHTq N 

20 tfi I^KCWB : ^fi ne 

CWLOY . 26 eiC^^p 

' en 


TNH 


216 

25 . eqes 

TON WLJULOq 6" T 
ULHT6 NN6K&.H 

poc . \.qii^Y enul 

TON 


so 


NOYO 


e'ie. 


WLNT 35 

oYoeie. naa NT&.q 
epoq N 


^YCTOC . 


Ne . 
pq 


ne'iw 
neqtw 


NOYKtwgf epe 

neqoYoeiN OYO 
Yd) eqt 
e&ox fi^e M. 

nHpn : 

<S'i ULOOY : 

epe neqeme 


GYBING 
3N NTOOY NT 
MBYH. OY^. W.N 
*eqeme 


pON 


40 


45 


50 


55 


289 

pleta sunt, ad theoriam (OscoQla) spiritualem (nvevfiarixov) re- 
feruntur quae in ecclesia (exxtyaia) completa sunt. 


IX. DE AMETHYSTO (a^edearo? = a 


Norius lapis, qui est amethystus (af^edearog = 
5 postremus in tertia serie, incidit in Issachar, secundum (xard) 
consequential*! (anovhovQia = cMoAovOla) procreationum. De 
isto dicit lacob in benedictionibus : Issachar concupivit 
(eneiOvpei = enidvjueiv) * bonum et terrain, quia opima est. p. 358 a 
Accubabit inter terminos (K^QO^. Requiem vidit esse bonam, 
lohumerum siium supposuit, factus est vir agricola* ( 1 ). 

Issachar agriculturae praefectus fuit. Obtigit (^rjQovv) 
ei lapis amethystus (djueOvarog) ex (Kara) eadem destinatione. 
Hie quidem lapis ex abditis suis multum splendorem emit- 
tit, instar flammae, lumine candentis. Colorem prae se fert 
15 instar vini aqua temperati, infatuati. Aspectuseius variusest. 
Invenitur autem iste in montibus Libyae (Ai^^). Alius 
quidem* similis est hyacintho (vdxivdog) purae (xaOaeov),a\ius p. 358 b 


1 Gen. 49, 14-15. 


eqeiNe iOLnec ^toiie 

noq J5.RKOK3 TOWS. *,Yt5> eq 

2s.cc. ecg&.pe nei 2&,xou. epe n 

K60Y&. ^.e jytw 5(&)& npene'i N 

ne ^^.Tfi N6Kp) Neiwiiif peq 20 

OY N^&.X&.CC&. N COY6N HGOYO 

NOY ei^ slne^i 

W.WN NC&. ne 

Q[c] xe eTBHHTq cpoqT e[TW.NT] 

10 Nrfi ne4>ec'ioxo OYoete [OYCMH?] ^ 25 

roc. xe cg&.q 2k e ne nefiuwte] 


ne . 

RTOYpHC, . NT&.q2 NOY 

neqeiNe xe MINT &.$op&> 30 


291 

similis est cochli (o c Aog = 9e6%Aog) sanguini, qui alter inve- 
niri solet in litore maris (6dAaooa) unius Libyae 
Aiptirj). De isto dicit Physiologus (yeaioAoyoi; = 
Praemonstrare solet tempestatem (y i i^v= ^ei^v) ex- 
sAustro. Solet O autem <tunc> aspectus eius turbidus et 
scaber esse, qoud congruit (ngdaei) tempestatis, (xipwv = 
%Eifi(f>v) not is secundum eos qui vacant agriculturae. (Pul- 
cher) autem est ille lapis et mirabilis. Nomen eius meta- 
phora (ftevTCKpoQa = [tercupoQd) accipitur ( 2 ) 


1 Exinde interpretatio incertissima. 
8 Desinit : BLAKE, p. 152, 14. 


H 


(Musee du Caire, n 9273). 


<T . GTBG 


[ 


2 ) wl 

[3C*HO]C (3) fiTOlKOY 

WLHNH . ere me 

M.M.OOY <SfteacX&.C 

' cau&OY 


.> 

OY&.N WlnNOYB 

ficexi 

[N]<toNC 


20 


fi 


10 


r&.p 3. 
eT0..&.Y sine 


]NT[ 


25 


lie 6TB6 TOlKtW 


HHI wl(noeiK) 


30 


is co2s.meoc xe NG ( 6 ) 

6TB6 Tw'i JULNT 


1 Litterarum notae in manuscripto valde lacero deficientes, un- 
cinis quadratis [ ] quae a D. Munier, rotundis ( ) quae a nobis 
expletae sunt designantur. 

2 MUNIER in Catalogo : [LN]Keceen6 

3 MUNIER legit [CNO]C . Sed legendum puto [WLGpOjC, si- 
cuti in versione ib erica : the maritime districts . . 

4 MUNIER in Catalogo legit : GYG1N6 ; in epistula privata emen- 
dandum esse in GYUPNG mihi amabiliter scripsit. 

6 Lectio incerta quae sensum non praebet. 

6 MUNIER : itG 

'MUNIER: [GTJM.M.&.Y 

MUNIER : N[T]rA,2U[&&,l&,]. Desunt circiter 13 lineae. 

9 vei eac^p7ee(c^e ^.G). cfr. P . soe. 1. 11. 


293 

H 

(Musee du Caire, no. 9273). 
<X. DE LAPIDE CHRYSOLITHO> 


....... * Romania et reliquae (gentes, regiones ?), R 

orbis terrarum (oixov^vrj = ofaovftsvr]'). Advehunt illos 
per mare (BdAaaaa) quod alluit Zabulon (SafiovAcov Za- 
5 povA6v). Hue enim (ydo) advehunt chrysolithum (%QV- 
= %Qva6A.i6o<;), quae gemma est pretiosa propter 
= ol%odo/u,ri (?)). Chrysolithi (%Qvao- 
autem sunt<vocati>propterhunc ful- 
gorem (-AaftnQos) et colorem aureum quern non afficit vis 
10 ignis. Ibi enim (ydo) exstat pagus Nazareth Galilaeae . . . 


[Bethlehem quod] * interpretando intelligitur 

domus panis, ubi incepit (a.Q%eiv) poni ut funda- 


1 Cf. BLAKE, p. 153, 23. In versione latina non legitur. 


15 


ci(m 
T w.nec'foc [ 
TG r&.p Te 
xe necf oc [ 
5 ne NT[ (WL)] 

M.oq e[ 
TM NN [ 

M.M.OOY[ 

mcTic[ 


M.M.(Oq 

xe[nec]-foc[ 
K[ ]q etg[ 

n[ 


NM xe (&.Y) 

T(tWl)C WLWLOq 


C[ 

20 p[ 


294 
K[ 


H 8 ) 


[ ]N 


( 4 )nec-foc 


(NOBG.) neqc 
(Noq a.e e)TBe f dm 


[GBOX] enTHpq 
[TN] neTKWT 

NOY&. 


25 


(NOYl)OOY ( 6 ) M-N OYC 30 

(tioq) O eTpeqjgtw 

[ne 

[cN]Te 

(nLO)OY JULN 6TB6 

(neitw) eB02s. ULN n 35 


40 


1 MUNIER legit N Cl[$9e ]. Legendum existimo 
sicuti invenitur in versione ib erica. 

2 MUNIER : WIM.&.Y 

3 Desunt circiter 10 lineae. 


Cl(tt)W ) 


6 MUNIER : [eY]<90YO 

6 MUNIER : [WIJUI]OOY 

7 MUNIER: M.N OYC[6l?] 

8 MUNIER, in Gatalogo : cgtUJne T]d.Iie : in epistula : O)(fi)[ne 


9 MUNIER : 

10 MUNIER : T<flN[OY(0]tg 

11 MUNIER : 


295 

mentum in Sion ... crucis (aravgde) . . . nam crux ( 

eum eos ........ 

fides (ntanq) . et posuerunt eum 

. . . . quia crux (aravgoc:) ....... in 

saltitudine. . angulorum. Post haec autem sepelierunt 

eum in sepulcro 


. ,' . . . * quando immolatus est in crucey a 

effudit aquam et sanguinem, ut caput fieret 
utriusque muri aedificii : aquam vero ad ablutionem et pur- 
10 gationem (teaOaQia/jLo?) peccatorum; sanguinem suum autem 
ut aspergeretur super inquinatos ("). Postquam autem 
prorsus reprobatus fuit ab aedificantibus factus est caput 


1 Cf. Hebr. 9, 13, 19, 21. 


296 


ne NK003 : . . 
e 


NT XO CNT6 JOLft 
5 KtWT. 6T6 fiCB 

Be ne. M.N TM.NT 
vrcEBe. e^oYN e 

f M.NTOY*. NOT 
[tt)T] 0) 

10 [KON] (M.)N 

T6T 


15 


(. . . . 

*^H ffNO(YB eq) 
erne. eq(o 


20 ne 
neTpx 
Te. 
TOY 


necno 


ne N 

6TO N 

eTpeY 

GB02S. NT 


25 


Tepe nevpa^N jgo 
Be . w.npw.e 


xe CYKH 


NN6 OYfik. (M.6) 

eve ( 5 ) epON . 3[<wc] 
efixe 3ik,x[e (NT&,)] 
npo 3wL(nT) 
peN(xooc xe T) 


xe ) ( 6 ) 


1 MUNIER, in Catalogo : NOY[ ] ; in epistula NOYftWT] 
9 Desunt circiter 5 lineae. 


so 


35 


40 


45 


MUNIER : 

4 MUNIER, in Catalogo : ^NC^BHYe : in epistula : 

6 MUNIER, in Catalogo : NN6 OY&.[pM.]eYe ; in epistula : NN6 

oY*.[pM.e]eYe epON af^c] 

6 Desunt circiter 5 lineae. 


OQ7 

^"^ <St7 / 

anguli (i). Cum ascendisset ad coelos, coniunxit muros 
ambos aedificii, id est circumcisionis et non circumci- 
sionis, in unitatem spiritualem (Tivev/iaTixov) et firmita- 
tem(?)( 2 ) . . . et . . 

5 


colorem * ami puri (xaOctQov) proferens : . . . vero apud pe-V b 
tram (yt^rga) putei ad litusBabylonis (BafivA&v) Achaemenidis 

w(A%e[j,evi$ = 'AxaLftdvyg). Mos est rerum quae geminum nomen 
gerunt diversitatem (dicupoQo) distinguere, <aliquo additivo> 
quo nomen diversum fiat ( 3 ). Neque existimes res utiles (%Qrj- 
0i[A(ov = xQijatfAov) otiose esse appositas, ut nemo putet nos 
dicere verbum (vanum?) ( 4 ) dicendo : Babylon Achaemenidis. 

15 Invenimus enim scriptum in Scriptura sancta ( B ) 


1 Act. 4, 11. 

2 Cf. Eph. 2, 14. 

3 Contortula sententia quae sic intelligenda videtur : mos est 
rerum quae idem nomen gerunt distinguere diversitatem, apponendo 
distinctivum. Sic dicitur Babylon Achaemenidis et Babylon Aegypti. 

4 WJ&Xe NT&,npO : ad litteram, verbum oris, id est verbum quod 
solum est flatus vocis, verbum vanum ( ?) nisi forte melius legendum : 
<9&.2[ NC]npO , considerando CIjCpO = 6Itp&. E versione ib erica 
sensum huius passus depromere licet : Nemo putet nos dicere 
verbum superfluum et vanum si nomini Babylonis addimus nomen 
Achaemenidis. 

6 Desinit: BLAKE, p. 154, 28. 


298 


(British Museum Or. 3581 A (8). No. 2 CRUM, Catal No. 180, 

pp. 70 b -71). 


. CTBS 


*NeTN&.2tpO NT&.YM.OY F&.p THpOY S1TNOYCSIM.6 K&.T&, 

M.M.OC ridi njgnpe 


NaJUlOY eTBGT^l ^YtW eYN^tMN^ THpOY ^ITNOYC^IM.6 

OYON NIM. NTficYmcTeYe ene;cc eTBenoYoeiNrte 

62CNTOIKOYM.HNH THpC 


.neY&.r(WN ^.Ytw ON &.&&.$ xpo 

KXOM. GTBGT^l T^ltfeTe ^6 NT^N^me MJieicgOWtNT 

10 


NTM.NTOYHHB JULNTWLNTppO JULNTW.NTJ9ptlM.lCe 

xea^qxi HOY^WXB eTBeoYc^uuie IWCHCJ) xe s^qxi 

NWLJULNTCgpnJULlCe NTGYNOY ^qXpO eTeC^lWie NpM,NKHJl8.e 

M.N epoq &.qcopu.oY neNT^qxpo xe ^twtwq 15 

2^.e Yei ^.e stwtwq ^.qxno Nak.q NTJULNTOY- 
HHB eBO*. ^iTNOYKtw^ e^qxiKB^. JunreNoc NNepwiciKi- 
M.&. eTBexeSwYTjgme NTeqctwNe Kas.Tw Tei^e ON 
BHN NT^qtoce xeacqtjme NTecgiwie wineqeitwT 

ON TKeSSLNTppO T8U NT^qX*HOC,N^.q N(^l lOYa.8^C NTGpeq- 20 

to ^twne ^NOYJUieT^NOi^ NqKpme 


299 


(British Museum Or. 3581 A(8). No.2. CRUM, Catal.No. 180, 

pp. 70b-71). 

<XI. DE LAPIDE BERYLLO> ("). 

^ . 

..... * qui vincent. Mortui enim (ydg) sunt omnes per p. 369 
mulierem, secundum (xard) quod dixit filius Sirach : Nos 
omnes moriemur causa illius , ( 2 ) et per mulierem vivent om- 

5 nes quicumque crediderint (mar stew) in Christum, quia 
lumen est ex Sancta Maria quod illuminavit mundum (ot- 
KovfjLYivri = oiKovpivvi) universum. 

Et multi confusi. sunt propter mulieres. Amiserunt fidu- 
ciam (naQQrjaia) suam simul cum corona agonis (ay&v) sui. Sed 

10 multi quoque victoriam adepti sunt et acceperunt coronam ( 3 ) 

propter illam. Hie ergo modus est quo invenimus illos tres 

viros sub argumento (tinodeaig) mulierum : unus quidem dam- 

num cepit, alii autem utilitatem perceperunt. 

Ruben quidem prolapsus est e dignitate (at-ico/ta) sacerdotii 

15 et regni et primogeniturae, quia se abiecerat mulieris causa (*). 

Joseph autem accepit primogenituram quando vicerat mu- 

lierem viri Aegyptii ( 5 ). Is contra quern invaluerant,eas ever- 

tit, qui et ipse vicerat illas sibi submisit. 

Levi etiam sibi comparavit sacerdotium per zelum quo 

2oultionem sumpsit de gente (yevog) Sichimorum, quia stupro 
violaverant sororem eius ( 6 ). Eodem quoque modo (%ard-) 
Ruben damnum cepit quia constupraverat uxorem patris 
sui ( 7 ), et ludas etiam illud aliud regnum sibi com- 
paravit ( 8 ) * quando paenitentiam (jisrdvoia) egit, iudica- p. 370 

25 vit <que> (KQLVSLV) id quod iustum (dlxatov) est, neque 


1 Cf. BLAKE, p. 156, 31. In versions latina deest. 

2 Sirach, 25, 33/ 

8 Cf. I Cor. 9, 25 ; II Tim. 2, 5. 

4 Gen. 35, 22 ; 49, 4. I Paral. 5, 1. 

5 Cf. Gen. 39, 1-24. 
Cf. Gen. 34, 1-31. 

7 Gen. 35, 22. 

8 Cf. Gen. 49, 8-12. Usque hue copticus cum iberico textu 
concordat ; quae sequuntur in iberico non leguntur. Cf. BLAKE, 
p. 157, 26. 


300 


GBOX M.neqn*.paoiTtt)M.&. ncgopn ULGN 
(leg. KCWXYC) Ne*.M.&.p eTM-Tpeccgts 
XGK&.C eqecgumq J&JULOC WLNCHXCMM. neq)Hpe 


W.M.OC 

RNOWLOC eTM.THtM.e cgttm M.NTeClWL6 GTeN^ 6T61 


ojtwrte 3NOYK*.pnoc eqr^xpHY Ncas.c(>a<.^i?e NTOM. THpc 
NTxs.NTTe2s.ioc NT*.c&.p;cei xe NXI^CWBG ^ITWLUNOJULOC &.c- 

10 


NC&.tlOYOTOYT NNUDBC OYXC 
&. OY^Y^lCeC XOOp NN6- 
TfiOYNT^Y M.M.&.Y NNCY^lC^HTHplON eYKYM.N^?e Iiei- 

naa NTCIULING npoc neoYoeicg M.neqBd,Btwn)^xe 15 

NTCYNPNCWWIH w.nNOYTe 


efubuit patefacere delictum (naQdnrco/ta) suum. Antea 
vero prohibuerat (xcoMeiv) Thamar quominus cum alio 
esset viro, ut traderet earn filio suo Selom ( J ). Quan- 
do autem ilia facta est < ?> ( 2 ), sub fallacia aspectus 
5(6ecoQia) ( 3 ) seipsam prostituit, secundum (%ard) dispen- 
sationem (oi^wvo^ia otxovoftia), etsi (xaiToiye) Lex (vd/uoc;) 
nondum prohibebat quin homo se coniungeret cum mu- 
liere quae sibi placeret. Nam (yag) etiam turn (stei = BTI) 
cultus I^ei flores produxerat, priusquam fuisset in fructu 

io(dg^o?) maturo, ut f irmaret (&cr<paAeiv) potestatem univer- 
sam perfectionis (-reAto? = re^eiog). Incepit (aQ%eiv) vero 
frondescere per Legem (voftos), flores produxit iucundos per 
prophetas (nqocpritri^), et postea fructus (xagnoQ) dedit per 
Evangelium (evayy&iov). Post maturitatem vero fructus (xdg- 

15 noo), non quaerenda est viriditas f oliorum, neque (ovde) opus 
(XQia =XQBia) est f loribus,sed augmentuin(v<re? =a 
dum eorum qui sensum (alffdrjTrJQiov) habent exercitatum 
vae = yv(tvdeiv). Quandoquidem (ensidrj) ille in hunc modum 
parumper (nQo<;-\ baud vana locutus est : nam (eneidrj) 

20illos nunc praeteriit opus misericordiae (ovvyvcofAq = avy- 
Dei per 


1 Gen. 38, 6-11. 

2 Textus mancus. Probabiliter supplendum N?CHp&. = vidua, 
ex Gen. 38, 11. 

8 Versio incerta. Forsan legendum est MQUJTQOV loco Qecogta ex 
Gen. 38, 14. 


302 


(British Museum Or. 3581 A (8), n 3. CRUM, Catalan 180* 1 ) 

foe [TCC] *f HY eBOx eTBeNecNOBe . C&.XM.(N xe *oYeeBO*.- 
ne swuiiHX seNTe4>Y2af NIOYA.*, a&.M.*.p a^ 
Te NNe<|>YMCT&.ioc lOYfcAC xe OYeeBOMte 

R&.1 eTCXS.^W.^d.T ^pOY^ ON 
RS.NNCO^(WW.1THC B06C XG OYeeBO^ne ^UL- 5 

OYOOT ioYa.acC Bepc^Bee a.e ON oYee- 

BOXT6 ^NNCYN&.X2s.dwKH 6^00 Y &.&.Yei&. X6 6BOX 
NTUNTppO WLNT^INCCWTW. WLIlXOeiC 2k,XXd 

ON a^neiw.^ a^NOYtwtyc CBOX M-nja^xe GT- 

.]qKXHpOY ULHODNe NBepHXXlON KdwT&, 10 
NT^CTC^BON Ni T^KOY^OY^l^. >Ytt) K&.T&. THR6 
NNUDNC ULNT6-&ett)pl&. NT^lNXnO NNC^HpC Nl^KtWB CYOYH^ 

NC&.NeYepHY neitWNe^e NBepYxxioN OYKX^YKONtie eqo 
Ln&.Y&.N N^^X^CCS. eqctwK eneme JULH&.HP eYeNT&q 

5DDUL&.Y NOYJULepOC NTG ndwULeeeCTOC CTeiMtt) JULNRODNe 15 

epoq xenerepoyc &.x^&, RCTO 


dme xe rniaa ^NU.UL&, NX&.U NTG nT&Ypoc UTOOY 


303 


(Brit. Museum Or. 3581 A (8), No. 3. CRUM, CataL, N 180 11 ). 
<XI. SEQUITUR DE LAPIDE BERYLLO> ( L ). 

.... * (Rahab) ( 2 ) reprobata fuit propter peecata sua. P 375 
Salomon quidem unus erat ex Israel, e tribu (9^97) luda ; 
Thamar una erat e Philistaeis (QvAiaraios) ; ludas unus erat 
5e semine (on&Qfjia) Abraham illius benedicti ; Ruth 
quoque una erat e Moabitis (Mcoapwrjs = Mcoajfremg) ( 3 ) et 
Sodomitis (ZodoDfiirrjs) : Boes autem unus erat ex Israel et ex 
eadem tribu (<pv^) luda ( 4 ) ; Bersabee ( 5 ) etiam una erat e com- 
mercio (avvvaAaxrj = avvaMaytf) malo ( 6 ) ; David vero erat e 

lodignitate (dltto/m) regia et oboedientia Domino. 

Sed cum in hoc loco moramur, dilatavimus sermonem de 
loseph qui haereditate accepit (K^QOV = nhriQovv) lapidem 
beryllum (peQV)Miov= pygMliiov) sicut (ttatd-) docuit nos se- 
quentia (axovAovOia = anohovBia) et secundum (xa.rd) nume- 

15 rum lapidum et considerationem (OewQia) generationum fi- 
liorum lacob qui alius alium sequuntur. 

Hie ergo lapis beryllus (fieQvMiov = fiqQtiMiov) gluacus (xhav- 
xov = yAavxov) est, coloris marini (Qdhaaaa), vertens ad si- 
militudinem aeris (atfe), naturam participans (/ASQOS) amethysti 

20 (afieOearog = d^edvarog) aquaticae (?) ( 7 ) unaque lapidis qui 
vocatur peteros (jiereQax;) ( 8 ), sed (<UAa) mollis (xavvwv = 
%avvov) est in genere (yevog) huius lapidis et hyacinthi (vaxiv- 
6og) non tincti. Invenitur in desertis locis mentis Tauri (Tav- 
QOC;). Si quis voluerit hunc soli supponere videtur veluti 


1 Cf. BLAKE, p. 159, 34. 

a Ita supplendum e versione iberica. BLAKE, p. 159, 33. 

3 Ruth, 1, 4. 

4 I Paral. 2, 3-11. 

6 Hie in textu iberico lacuna habetur quae partim a coptico 
feliciter suppletur. 

6 II Reg. 11, 3 et seq. 

7 Gallice vert d'eau . Cf. nota 3, p. 255. 

8 Gum infra legitur hie lapis inveniri in monte Tauro, hoc voca- 
bulum jieTGQog a nomine' 6 TO.VQOS corruptum esse videtur. 


oe- q &&&.Y NgeNx&Ktt. *N&.Bei<teiNe 

SI^OYN WLWLoq evepoYoem 
ecxieine kYtt) GCTOOTC N*G 
8cY( ecnpitwoY LW.&.Te eco 

RUNG Xe ON NBGpYX^lON eCGlNe NN61M.OY&.3 NM- 5 

oYNKewime xe ON eceme w.nKOYx^piON ene- 
H neqcNoq H rccopr NKOKKOC GY^INC xe NTeiBepvx- 

6BOX W.neY4>P^THC HUpO CJDN6 XG N1M. 
C6JUL6 W.W.OOY Ntfl NpULUL^.0 8.YCW ^NtynHpeNG 
Ce<ta.2B JULN ^s,TNN6T^HN epOOY CCTacClHY 10 


po YM.ee YG &.e epoq 

eqcgoon 

NTepeqpcgu.tt.0 xe ^qwjtwne 15 
eqo Nppo 


epoq w,epeoYON <$e epoq emHTei NpptwoY 

N&.Y 

- 20 


305 

fragmenta * vitri intrinsecus habere lucida. 376 

Habetur et alius beryllus (fisQvMiov = firiQijAAiov) huic 
similis et spJendens tamquam pupilli draconum 
perlucidus est variique coloris. 
5 Habetur et alia species berylli 
qui similis est illis ceris liberticis ( 

Alia rursus est species quae magis similis est corallo (xov- 
Aagiov ==. xogdAAiov), vel eius sanguini, vel lauae coccineae 
(HOMO?). Hie beryllus (JleQvMiov = prjQvMiov) reperitur circa 

loexitum fluminis Euphratis (EvyQdrrjg). Omnes lapides be : 
rylli (peQvMos = ftrJQvMos) appetuntur a divitibus, atque in 
ornatu (feoa^o?) mirabiles sunt, sed ab iis qui ipsis sunt vicini 
despiciuntur. Pretio habentur a regibus longinquis quemad- 
modum (wed-) etiam. in Joseph contigit. Hie enim (ydo) odio 

15 a f ratribus . suis habebatur. Quando autem habebatur ut 
alienus, amore eum complexus est Pharao rex. Quando vero 
domi degebat cum patre suo a f ratribus despiciebatur. Sed 
alienus factus, rex est constitutes <et> eo delectabantur 
viri et mulieres. Eum invenire non festinabant ut eumpone- 

20 rent in ornatum (tto'cytoc) suum, quern concupiscebant 
Qvpei = eniOvfteiv). Nemo eum invenire potuit nisi 
el fjiiri TI) soli reges. Potentes simul ac ingenio praediti Joseph 
laudabant. Mulier vero aegyptiaca, quamquam (xaineQ) con- 
cup ivisset (eneidvjuei = entdv/tstv) beatum (^atidqio^ <Io~ 

25seph> C). 


1 Desinit BLAKE, p. 160, 3. 


-366 


K 
(ZOEGA, CataL, p. 610-611 Codex Sahidicus CCLV.) 


fqr 

eqT&.eiHY ^M. ncgw.M.0 . n&.2itt>ftJi&. . cedme 

S.N tfettH <5N NKOCM.OC NNe^lOM-C. CGUL6 M.N M.W.Oq, M.GYG- 

N6YKOCWLOC K^TSw^e NTMXOOC GIW.H- 

.H&.I N^I Np(ww.e 7590011 ^N 5 
ra^p tg^Ytctw wmtwrte HBY- 

-^peC^O) CpOC ^&. RClftA.*, N^l 

M.neitNe, K^T^ee NTkcdwxtoM. Ndi TWLNT- 
W.NHGNNOYC eoettjpei ON WLtia^i . +NHY a.e exw. 

( 2 ) Ntwne H&.1 GTKH e^p^i^M. n^oriON M.N 10 

eqtyoon N^e gn NtNe THPOY 
epoq. 

IS. 6TB6 


name NONY^KMN eTe nJULe^juiNTCNOYc ( s )ne 
ene^OYene^oYo ( 4 ) . cexw xe M.W.OC 


NK^.OWL eNeaN^^Y Ncg^YCtt) N^HTOY. 

OYN ^NKeoNe^ioN ^e GYJULOYTC epooY Kas.T&. neip^N NOY- 

tT .NM eTOY^.B3( 5 ) M.6N eYC(MK(e)rWs.OY^.N WLn^Blrfe (2L>e . 

erne ( 6 ) a.e S..N NKC^^PON &.xx&. nexoYW-OYTe epoq 20 


1 MS. TNW.NT rftOB. ~ a MS. nM.e^M.NTCNOOYC. * MS. 

nM.e^w.fcfCNOOYc 4 MS. eite^ooYene^oYO. ~ 

6 MS. eYOY^BOJ. 

6 Sic legit Zoega. Legendum est M.n^.Bl[deeiNe]. n&.BltfeeiNe 
[A.] &.N. . . Cfr. Peyron, Lexicon sub verbo et Crum, Diet., p. 3, 
Supra p. 304, 1. 1 legitur 


307 

K 
(ZOEGA, Catal., p. 610-611. Codex Sahidicus, CCLV.) 

<XI. SEQUITUR DE LAPIDE BERYLLO> (). 

... * accepit anulum a Pharaone, ( 2 ) et dignitate (&gia>fta.y p. 383 
fuit honoratus in <terra> aliena. 

Non invenitur facile in ornatibus (xoaftoQ) mulierum, quae 
squidem amant ilium, sed non possunt eum ornatibus (xoa- 
lios) suis aptare, sicut (ard-) dixi, nisi (ei^rei= el ^ rt) 
cum labore. Ilium vero amant viri quimagna sunt in dignita- 
te (a^ioifia). Plerique enim (ydg) ex istis lapidem beryllum 
(fivQsM.iov' '= prjQtiMiov) anulis suis aptant. 
10 Et sufficiat hactenus consideratio (OetoQia) huius lapidis 
secundum (teard-) quod infirmitas mentis (vovg) nostrae ilium 
contemplare (deoDQslv) potest. 

Venio autem ad duodecimum lapidem rationali (Aoyetov), 
et humerali impositum et qui ultimus omnium est lapidum. 
15 De quo incipiam (aQ%iadai = aQ%&aQai) dicere. 


XII. DE LAPIDE ONYCHIO (6v6%iov) ( 8 ). 

Lapidis onychii (dw%i(ov = 6vv%iov), qui est duodecimus, 
color multo magis rubicundus esi. Dicunt eo delectari 
uxores regum virorumque divitum. De eo coronam (= 
2olabrum) conficiunt vasis e quibus bibere solent. Exis- 
tunt et alii onychii (dvs%iov = 6v$%wv) qui eodem nomine 
(xara-) vocantur. Qui albi sunt, vergunt ad colorem 
vitri : non vitri puri (xaBaqov), sed (dA/lrf) quod vocant 


1 Cf. BLAKE, p. 164, 3-4. 

2 Gen. 41, 42. 

3 Cf. BLAKE, p. 164, 15. 


fnSL xe iun&.c eqTptgptwcg na^pVOYKOYi. *nae wmwrne tte 

6BOX <5NA.ttneiM.10N . 

NNeeiB Nptt>M.e N&.CTIOC , OY(N) ^NtceKOYi (l) 
H Nu.&.eiN NKpoKoc. OYjynHpe xe ne tceuuNe ^Y(W OY- 
ne &.YCV cetfme w.Loq &.H NNO^, gtwcxe Nced&ndouL 

BOXN^HTq N^N^N^^Y NCtfi) N^HTOY . (2) H&.H 

xe neiKer cYtfme w.w.oq ^N w.w.epoc 

WIN 


(5) 


eqo 


ib 

(7) , &.YOD CTpeNxooc ate n$(BB THpq M.nxo- 
rioii. n&.i r^p BGNI^WLIN neqcyoon N^e ^Ytw riToq 

ne NT*.YTOcyq nppo GXRJL nmx .c.o Y?S. ra^p 
OY6B02S. (8) ne &n Te4>YXH N fteiii&.u.itf 

xe nejcc H neNTa^YxiTq eneYjgaoi 15 


pptWOY s.Y) 

Te ee NT&jiNTppo NC^OYX 

Te<J>Y2s.H 


. TW 

Npppo N^I 

T^Cac- 20 
ULICOY- 


1 MS. 

2 MS. addit: M.neNdme 


sinTonoc eTOY^me 


3 MS. KSwTfl^ OYtf)nH[pe] aje &JYTO)cg 

. 4 MS. B;e]Nl8v.M.lN (5) MS. NT8.YtT]Oa)q (6) MS. 
N)[H]pe (7) MS. eOYONNlM. (8) MS. OYe6B02s. 


309 

violaceum (uwag = toetg), aliquantulum (7t%Q&) rubens * ad p. 384 
modum lapidis docimitis (da)xipiov = doxt/teiov). Naturaliter 
(<peaei = ytiffei) enim (ydg) splendet sicuti ungues virorum 
elegant ium (aanog = dareTog). Insunt ei etiam parvae ma- 

Sculae vel signa croci (%QO%O<;). Mirabilis vero et pulcher est 
ille lapis : attamen non invenitur satis magnus ut (Sare) 
ex eo effici que~.nt vasa ad bibendum ( 1 ). Olim ($#?) vero 
audivimus hunc alterum invenire in regionibus (IA&QOS) 
Indiae ('Ivdta) et Thebai'dis (B^aei? = O^aig), et aliis 

10 etiam in locis (ronog). 

Secundum (xard) mysterium ille idem lapis refertur ad 

Beniamin qui ultimus omnium est constitutus secundum 

'(xard) sequentiam (aKovhovQia = axoAovOici) generationum fi- 

liorum, et, ut ita dicamus, ultimus totius operis rationalis 

i5(Aoyetoi>). Iste enim (ydo) Beniamin erat ultimus, idem- 
que primus fuit constitutus rex super Israel. Etenim 
(ydg) Saul, -films Cis, ex tribu (yvhrj) erat Beniamin, qui 
Saul interpretando intelligitur (eg^eveve = 
Christus aut eius vicarius. Saepe (jroAAd^tg) enim 

20duces exercitus (aTQarvAarrji; = aTQarrjMrrjg) vices ge- 
runt regum et alii ducum (rjye/j.&v) gerunt vices. Tale 
fuit regnum Saul, antequam regnare coepit (aQ%eiv) tri- 
bus (yvhri) luda per David : hoc modo etiam Saul assump- 
sit regnum vice aliena. Sed (dAAd) haec etiam alia finis C 2 ) 


1 Ex MS. addendum hie : Non invenimus locum ubi ille reperitur. 

2 Cf. BLAKE, 165, 6. 


310 


(GuiDi, Frammenti Copti, pp. 67-72. Rendiconti III, 2, 
pp. 37-42. ZOEGA, No. CXXXI). 


file *XM M.HIHX M.NNC&. Te;eM.&.M0ci&. NT&Y^e epoc 

&6m&,u.iN . gic^Hp r&.p Tjgeepe Te N^WLIN^X^B . HCON 


ficeM.eei. 


rte 


M.M.OC. H T &- HNOJULOC 

erpeYt NOYtwNe^ e^p^i NCSJOY^HNG ere OYGIB 10 
ne EUN^Y NT^YT^WLIO rme^ RnTOJ^c. W.N 

OYK^J9. OYCT8JCTH. OY^&.2^B^.Ne . OY61B. 

OH eKeTtwcg. jjciB xe ON OYcotffi ne 

^.Ytw neqK&.c nroq neT^oac eB02s. exw. HTBT GTOY- 

W.OYTE epoq xe KO^^OC. gpaa ^SL n&.i j98wYT^.M.io 15 

. 6YNOYXG W.W.OOY 6XM. IieiB GBO^ ^SL H61TBT 

Js^xk xeK^c NNeicowK wLnj^xe. 
4>ecic N^u)B NIUL . SS.YW eixo CBO 

HIGIB. 

*XN BGNI^WLIN 6TB6 20 

ids. tit?) TCOC j ) p OCYNH> jjexpo ra^p a^q^pe^ (l) epoq JSLneqcoN itwcHcJ) . (tic) 

S.M.epic eso^ ^ITM. neqcorc HWCH^). NTSvYojcwne (sic) 


MS. 


311 


(GuiDi, Frammenti Copti, pp. 67-72. Rendiconti III, 2, 
p. 37-42. ZOEGA, No. CXXXI) 

<SEQUITUR DE LAPIDE ONYCHIO> 


* salutis Israel post captivitatem (sxpakwaia alxfiiho*- p. 385 
aid) inventa est in <tribu> Beniamin. Esther (EiadrjQ = 
'Eadtfo) enim (y&q) filia erat Aminadab fratris patris Mar- 
5 dochei (Maqro^aioi; = Ma<5o#atog) ( 2 ). Mardocheus vero 
filius erat lari, filii Semei, filii Chisel (KiaaloQ), e , tribu 
(yvAtf) Beniamin ( 3 ). Et primo Israel salvatus erat ab hostibus 
suis a Saul, e tribu (yvhrj) Beniamra ( 4 ) et novissime, post cap- 
tivitatem (e^aAcoorta = at^cdaxn'a) <Babylonis>, salvavit 

lonos Esther, e tribu (yvhrf) Beniamin ( 5 ). Quae consideratio 

(6eo)QLa) admiratione digna fuit. 

A Lex (vdjLiog) enim (yd(j) praeceperat (xeAeijeiv) imponi ony- 
chem (ct>veg=owg) quod est onycha ( 6 ) super aromata, quando 
praepararent oleum unctionis et aroma, casiam, stactem 

15 (atajtrrj), galbanum (%aA.pdvrj), onycha ( 7 ). Alias aliter 
<adhibetur>. Onyx etiam unguentum est quod <ex eo> 
conficitur, cuius adeps est <ex> integumento piscis qui 
yocatur cochlea (^o^Aog). Ex hoc conficere solent varia 
genera unguentorum admiscentes una cum onyche, <quae 

20 detrahunt> ex illo eodem pisce. 

Sed (d/Ua) ne protraham sermonem, naturam(9?eo i t?= q>vffi?) 
cuiusque operis ostendendo tempusque conterendo, modum 
quo parantur unguenta de onyche, silentio praeteribo. 
Bene Oca/lwg) igitur tribuitur onychius (dvv^iov) * Beniamino, p. 386 

25propter sapientiam (aoyQoavvrj = aaKpQoarivrj). Super salu- (Ms. 387) 
tern enim (yd(j) loseph fratris sui vigilavit. Quinque accepit 
partes (^SQI?) a fratre suo loseph ( 8 ). Ex eo enim (ydg) exorti 


1 Cf. BLAKE, p. 165, 5. 

2 Esther 2, 7. 

3 Esther, 2, 5. k 

4 I Reg. 9, 1-2. 
6 Esther 2, 5. 

6 Onycha scribimus ut in Vulgata -.'owl- graece et GIB coptice 
idem significare videntur. 

7 Exod. 30, 34. 
^ Gen. 43, 34. 


312 

r&p GBOX SM. naa Fitfi ^NXO^OTHC . M.N ^Npeqwiitge . 
xe a^qxi EnTonoc M^IMIM. ^paa SM. neqKXHpoc 
ereq eN^HTq fidi neaYCikCTHpion SLnnoYTe . ejgjge 
eTpe rtaa tgcwne N^P^H ficyopn erjuiNTppo 

nfil&. N10YX8^C GTBG II&.1 (*>&&. NTW.NTppO 

mw. eqpNOBpe uLtiTorcoc . Jy,qxi rs.p N^I 
nocToxoc II&.YA.OC. neje eBO^ ^fi re<|>Y^H 

N-t-OY NOYODN JSLn^p^. NGqCNHY . eY9&.NtW9 T<.p 

ceene NNMIOCTOXOC n^ficon &nn OYoeijg 

HIM. Nrfl It\.TtOCTOXOC 6TOYccB nLYXOC . tt)C 10 


eqxiwioeiT e^oYN eYWLiTTYxioc js.eq^e 

NT6 TM.G. K&.2OUC ^G jg^pe NpptMOY 
T^.M.10 N&.Y NOYXtW GBOX ^M. UGltMNG 

OYM.e rk.p nemeTOY^acB N^nocToxoc a^qeme NTjge- is 
^eeT GTOY^^B M.nejec wlnxtw NT\.YT^.^q ri&.q ^ITM. 
fn? nnoYTe. *fiToq ra^) BemsjuiiN neNT&.qxi SJLnSwiidT mtw- 
&IIN&.Y fiTa\.YNoxq e^p^ 

N600Y 

epooY NNIM. Hca<.B^2^^.K WIN TtHi 5JLneKei?T . 20 
epoeic NjgoYjgoY 5s.niH2v. NNIJUL. eTe .MW 

T8s.ll^.p^H . R1LN (sic) 

NNOYB ei (1) N^T He*. neNT&.qxooc 

ne ajir ^tw. eiTfis. nex^q xfi^eBpMoc GBOX 

. Te<}>YMt fiBcm^.u.m 25 
. GIO 

HN^GIOTG. W.H HKGCGGn 

CYM.&.;COC 


1 MS. H. 


313 

sunt sagittarii (dogorvji; = rot-tiris) et viri bellatores. Ille 
vero accepit in sprtem (xAfJQog) suam locum (rorcog) 
Jerusalem ubi erat altare (OvoiaartfQiov) Dei 0- Oportebat 
enim (ydo) ilium primum esse initium (dQ%r}) quoad regnum ; 
5 sed (dMd) dederunt locum ludae propter dignitatem (dt-tct)- 
fjta) regiam et aliquam considerationem (6ea>Qia) loco (ro^ro?) 
utilem. Accepit enim sanctus Apostolus (dyios dnoaToAog) 
Paulus qui e tribu (yvArj) erat Beniamin ( 2 ), quinque partes 
prae (finaQct naqd) fratribus suis ( 3 ). Si enim (yap) leguntur 

loreliqui <libri> apostolorum (drcoo-roAo?) <videmus illos 
praedicasse> saepe <et> de tempore. (*). Apostolus (dno- 
(TToAo?) sanctus Paulus vero piaedicavit ubique, quia 
(&Q) dignus factus erat gratia fydQig) plurima ( 5 ). Et ilia 
interpretatio historiae (larogid) viam ducit ad perfectionem 

i5(-TwAtof = reAeios). Non perit aliquid veritatis. 

Bene (xaAa><;) enim reges et magnates solent sibi scyphum 
facere ex illo lapide onychio (ove%iov = dvv%iov). Vere enim 
(ydg) ille sanctus apostohis (dnoaroAoQ) obtulit sponsae sanctae 
Christi vas quod ei a Deo est datum. * Ipse enim (ydo) p. 387 

20 Beniamin accepit scyphum Joseph quando immiserunt ilium (Ms. 388) 
in saccum eius ( 6 ). Dixit enim (ydq) Samuel Saul : Gloriae 
et decora Israel cuinam custodiae tradita sunt nisi tibi et 
domui patris fait ( 7 ). Quern oportebat enim (ydo) custodire 
decora Israel, quae sunt mysteria (/j,var^Qiov) sancta, armus 

25 (tttoAed) ( 8 ) et primitiae (dndQ%rj) et vas aureum et argenteum, 
nisi ilium qui dixit : Israelitae (EiaQa^ir^g = 'laQarjMrrjs 
suni,et ego ( 9 ) ? D^inde dicit : zHebraem ('EpQalog) ex Hebraeis 
semen (an^pa) Abraham, tribu (yvAij) Beniamin,Pharisaeus, 
(0ctQictaaios = 0aQLaalo<-) secundum (xara) Legem (v6/j,og) ( 10 ) 

so abundantius aemulator existens traditionum (naqadoaig) pa- 
trum meorum.* (i 1 ) et reliquum sermonis. Propterea in 
115 psalmo (yahfj,6g), quern Symmachus superscribit 


1 Jos. 18, 28. a Rom. 11, 1 ; Philipp. 3, 5. 8 Gen. 43, 34. 

4 Textus mancus : Interpretatio incertissima. 

5 Rom. 1, 5 ; 12, 3 etc. Gen. 44, 2. 7 I Reg. 9, 20. 

8 Loco ttcoAea, legerem xoMa. Probabiliter textus graecus lege- 
bat : dnciQxij rtfe KotUaq. 

9 II Cor. 11, 22. Philipp. 3, 5. " Gal. 1, 14. 


314 

extwq xe itMeaj9eMNTfc.ee ne. nexfc.q xe 

eTBe tifc.i fc.ijgfc.xe. qxtw rfc.p M.neijgfc.xe ftoYtsrr MN 

5.15. N TeqemcToxH. xe fc.NON ^OXUN TfnncTeYe 

6TB6 ITfc.1 TNJ9fc.Xe. 8yJ)fc. (fe NeNTfc.YJ9tt)ne 55.IW.&. 6T- 


T1KOC . 

RT^qtticTeYe TtwN.eiw.HTei 

KOC. ^.Ytw ceN8s.TcW.OK ate OY tteTejgjge epoK 

*NTOq a.6 8cqTtWOYN NqN^Y 6BOX s.N A.YXIM.061 

^YxiTq e^OYN 6THOMC. 6 TB WM qxtw wLw.cc ^fi 10 

OY&.KOYXOY&1&.. X6 &.NOK A.6 M^BBIO W.M.&.T6. R6T- 
Tfc.^HY rcp 6XN OYafc.pW.fc. 6fc- ^H M.1IOOY . WNNCfc. OYKOYl 
C6CCDK WLM.Oq ^N T^ IX NKeOYfc. NqNfc,Y fc.N 6BOX. X6- 

Kfc.c eqNfcTtwoYN wqTtwtwBe. &I-TISL nM.fc.em NTM.WT- 
. xe eqTTtN MN nnoYTe ^fc Tfc.p^H. pfc.i ^fi 15 

NTM.NTfc.TCOO YN . fa& Tfc.p H H^tWB 6T- 

Enfc.pfc. nfc.1. xe neTTfc.xHY exfi OY^fc.pM.fc. 

HOYKOYl ^M. neOOY M.N Ilfc.51tWMfc. eTJSOYeiT . 
OYJ9CN6. 6 TBe n ^ ^^^ M.MOC ^N OYtWNg 6B02S. M.H (sic) 

o Yfc.ro Y2s.oYeifc.. xe fc.NOK xe fc.i'&BBio MMfcre. ^lOYcon 20 

NOYtWT eqjgOptgp NTM,NTNfc.C9T3HT . ^ITM ntftW2^H 6B02S. 

M.neNTfc.qo)fc.xe NM.M,oq fc.Y(w ON Kfc.Tfc. nctOM.fc. eqo N-(-C> 

cgOYNfc. Nfc.q. <31TN TM.NT6B1HN. M.N ^6 6TOYX1M.061T 

gtrrq M.M.OC. efc.qBt)K C^OYN exfc.Mfc.cKoc SM neicMOT. 

gTB6 Hfc.1 qXOD MMOC Xe fc.NOK fc.lXOOC ^N Tfc.6KCTfc.ClC 25 
N1M 3NCfc.MMNTNOYX N6. ^N OYM6 Tfc.p fc.q- 

OYntwjgc ntii cfc,OYX . neiOYoei$9 M.N cfc.oY2s. . 
T6NOY xe nflsY^oc, ncTOY^epMeNeYe M.M.OCJ Kfc.Tfc. 


~-~~ OlO ' 

11 , dicit : Credidi (niatetieiv) propter quod locutus sumo ( 1 ). 
Hoc enim (y&o) idem verbum dicit cum David in epistola 
(enioroAtf) sua : Nos quoque credimus (niaretietv) propter quod 
loquimur ( 2 ). Num quae illic acciderunt corporaliter (oro>- 
5 patixoi; = aatftaTM&c;), hie peracta sunt spiritualiter (nvsv- 
[AatMoi; = zivevfiaTixatc;)'? Sic loquitur : Credidi (niarstieiv) 
propter quod locutus sum ( 3 ). Ubi credidit (niaretisiv) nisi 
(el ftrj rt) quando ivit Damascum et doceberis quid te opor- 
teat facere ( 4 ) ? * Ille autem surrexit non videns, et ducentes p. 388 

loillum introduxerunt in civitatem (n6Ai<;) ( 5 ). Propterea dicit (Ms. 389) 
congruenter (axovhovQia=axohovQla): Ego autem humilia- 
tus sum nimis ( 6 ) Qui enim (ydg) die ante currum (agpa) 
ascenderat, paulo post manu aliena trahitur non videns ( 7 ), 
ut surgens obsignet signo caecitatis se prius (aQxtf) pugnavisse 

15 contra Deum ex amentia ignorantiae ( 8 ). Quid enim (ydig) 
magis humilians quam (fjinaQa=naQa) hoc ut qui paulo ante cur- 
rum (&Q/UO) ascenderat in gloria et dignitate (al-ico/to), yanus 
f actu s sit repente ? Quapropter ap erte et congruenter (ayovAov- 
6ia= axoAovdia) dicit : Ego autem humiliatus sum nimis ( 9 ), 

20eodem tempore cordis duritiem conterensper manifestationem 
illius qui cum eo locutus fuerat, et praeterea secundum (a- 
ra) corpus (0<b/u,a) quoque commiseratione dignus factus prop- 
ter miseram suam conditionem et modum quo duxerant eum 
quando ingressus est Damascum in tali statu. Propterea 

25 dicit : Ego dixi in mentis excessu (exaraai?) meo : omnis homo 
mendax est ( 10 ) Et re quidem (ydg) vera fuit in admira- 
tione Saulus, qui tune erat Saulus, nunc autem Paulus ( n ), 
quod vertitur (eQ/u,evsvs = eQ^ve^siv) secundum (xard) in- 


1 Ps. 115, 10. 

2 II Cor. 4, 13. 

3 Ps. 115, 10 ; II Cor. 4, 13. 

4 Act. 9, 7 ; 22, 10. 

5 Act 9, 8; 22, 11. 

6 Ps. 115, 10 ; 141, 7 ; II Cor. 4, 13. 

7 Act 9, 8 ; 22, 11. 

8 I Tim. 1, 13. 

9 Ps. 115, 10 ; 141, 7 ; II Cor. 4, 13. 

10 Ps. 115, 11 ; Rom. 3, 4. 

11 Act. 13, 9. 


316 

xe nex&.;eic*TOc . a^Ytw qcoBK W.N 
fiToq ne n*.e NNaowcTOMJc .' kYts) 
fiToq neTOYWioYTe epoq firei^e M.M.IN wLwioq eqxtw 
M.M.OC xe nexa.^icToc HN&.TCOCTOXOC . GTBC RM CYULOYTC 
epoq xe n&.Yxoc S&.TN Nc^pouuiMoc . 6TC neqoY(W20.(l) 5 


oYno)C9c xe pcuuie HIM. ^NC^W.M.NTNOYX NG. 
r&.p ^N -frixHwl a^q^NTOY e^wdox Ne. 


5S.W.OC. xfiT^Yqi nxoeic NXIOYG a^YW) xe OYptww.e neio 

xe qnx^na^ mmHHcge. 
JULN Nptsme THPOY NT&.YW.OY 

BITq NX10YG. ^YtW XEneqTCMOYN GBOX 

NeTWLOOYT. fifiRNCtwc a.e NTepeqT^e TXtwpex fiTe 
tinoYTe. ^.Ytw e^q9&.xe NM.wi.oq CEO*. &n Tne eTBe is ( S * C ) 

HIM. ^NC^W.W.NTNOYX we. 
&.YTOM.cq eYM.OYTe epoq 

THYTN. N^cy 

Tne. fls/rtw etgtwne U.N 

NdwB^.^ N&.C9 N^e. ^YtM M.NNCtWC NTepeqN*.Y 20 

f q eB02s. a^- n^tMB . nex^q xe ^.micTeYe CTBC 

cTeYe enxoeic 
frrepeqcoYeN TM.C SLrtT^jgeoeicg . M.NNC>C 

8s.Ytw enjutx fiM.ne^ooY NT^qc\.Y Rqxi 
fiTe nxoeic. nexa^q xe eina^TeeBe OY25 
SLnxoeic enw-a. miTawq&.a,Y NU.ULM THPOY. N 610 wxitw- 
KTHC &.qTpaj>&ncg&. NTULNT^nocTOxoc . eio NpeqxioY&. 
NN^Y enNOYTe CBO^ ^fi Tne. eitgoon ^N OY- 


i MS, neqoYtw^w. ne. 


-317 

terpretationem (egju,evia eQfirjvetd) romanam 
Minimus (ehd%t,aro<;) . * Fuit autem statura (a&pa) pu- p. 389 
sillus ( 1 ), qui et novissimus fuit apostolorum (ajtoaroAog). Et (Ms. 390) 
quern sic vocabant, ipse dixit : Minimus (ehd%iato<;) aposto- 

5 lorum (anoa-tohoi;} ( 2 ). Propterea a Romanis (Qcofiaios) 
vocatur : Paulus , cuius interpretatio est : Minimus 
(ehaftujToQ). Idem ipse dixit et fuit in mentis excessu : Omnis 
homo mendax est ( 3 ). Quae enim (yao) audiverat Hierosoly- 
mis, invenit ea esse mendacia ; qui nempe (yag) ei dederant 

loepistolas (emarohrj) ut vindictam sumeret ( 4 ), nonne dixerant : 
Abstulerunt Dominum /r/i/n( 5 ) et Mere (cbtAtos) est ho- 
mo ( 6 ). et Decepit (nhavav) multos ( 7 ) et Similis est omni- 
bus hominibus qui mortui sunt et Discipuli (fiad^o) eius 
eum f urtim abstulerunt ( 8 ) et Non resurrexit a mortuis ( 9 ) ? 

isPostquam vero acceperat donum (dcoged) Dei et cum eo 
<Deus> locutus fuerat de coelo ( 10 ), propterea dixit : ((Omnis 
homo mendax est ( n ). Qui enim (ya.Q) f urtim ablatus, 
sepultus et a vobis homo vocatus, quomodo hie locutus est 
mecum de coelo? Et si phantasia ((pavraaia) est, quomodo 

2oclausit oculos meos? Et postquam reapse viderat : Credidi 

(niare^eiv) , inquit, propter quod locutus sum ( 12 ) * p. 390 
Etenim quandoquidem (eytsidrj ydg) credidit (niareveiv) (Ms. 391) 
Domino, locutus est ; et quando cognovit veritatem praedi- 
cationis, postea accepit bona (dyqOov), et pro malis quae pa- 

25traverat, accepit bona (dyadov) Domini : ((Quid , inquit, re- 
tribuam Domino pro omnibus quae fecit /m/u? (^) Eram 
persecutor ( 14 ) (did^er^), fecit" me dignum apostolatus (0^0- 
arohos) ( 15 ) ; eram blasphemus ( 16 ), dignus factus sum qui 
viderem Deum de coelo (^ ; eram in insipientia C 8 ), revelavit 

somihi mysteria (/j,saryjQiov = juvarrfQiov') ( 19 ). Deinde nihil 


1 II Cor. 10, 10. 2 I Cor. 15, 9 ; Eph. 3, 8. 

8 Ps. 115, 11 ; Rom. 3, 4. * Act. 9, 2 ; 22, 5 ; 26, 12. 

6 Matt. 28, 13. 6 loh. 19, 5. (?) Matt. 27, 63 ; loh. 7, 12. 

8 Matt. 28, 13. 9 I Cor. 15, 12- 13 (?) 

10 Act. 9, 4 et seq. u Ps. 115, 11 ; Rom. 3, 4. 

12 Ps. 115, 10 ; II Cor. 4, 13. " Ps. 115, 12. 

" I Cor. 15, 9 ; I Tim. 1, 13. 1B Rom. 1, 5. 

18 I Tim. 1, 13. 17 I Cor. 15, 8. 18 Tit. 3, 3. 

II Cor. 12, 4 ; I Cor. 2, 10. 


318 

e&eqtffi X&.&.Y 6T&.&.q NcgE&ic 

NTepeqxi xe ftnuioT. naa ero j5.M.&,eiN &IUIOY NIC . 
n&MN-ON nMioTi5.nM.oY. NeqpooYT exiTq &&. . icpajf 
NIC. &YCW nex^q xe im.xi NOYXW NOYXM T^ertei- 
K&.2s>ei J5.np&.N Slnxoeic. eqxtw U.ULOC xe K&.N eicg&.N- 
enwioY NN&.&.PN&, &.N Enxoeic. 

xe NM cgoon NTei^e . COYCWNS uLn^u)5 GBOX 
T^KOYXOY^I^. . nex^q r&.p xe HULOY NNGTOY&.&.B &n- 
xoeic T&.GIHY EneqETO e&ox. K&XWC de cya^YT^WLio 
N^Nxtw. H N&.noT e&ox ^ul neicDNe NONY^ION. &.YUD 10 

KJw^tWC 8^ BGNI^WLIN 61N6 W.ns.ttOT eTT&.eiHY K^Td. ^ 

eTeqxtw UL&&.OC xe n^i ne. a^qxi r&.p NTequiepic ec- 
NCOII. ^.Y^ioYe rcp epoq NN 
neit)B a.e ^N WL^xe. ^xx^ erae xe 
epooY THpoY . KcT&. oe exeqxow WLM.OC . xe is 


ON NpeqTtuprt ne BeNi^w.m . ttex&.q xe xe 

fiqt^pe W.RN^Y fipoY^e. erei 
eqo fijgHpecsjHM. ^N Teq^YJona*. T&.I eTOYtwn M.M.OC 
epoq xe KN&.Y fi)twpn fidi ne^Y^oc ne e&o&. &n BGMI^- 20 
W.IN ere nsa ne nKOYi NBGNI^WLIN. (f^qxiouicei ne R^ecsic) 

NeqTtupn ne &.YU) NeqoTcwM.. N T P et I- 

6T6 TM T6 

TW.NTpeq1"CBtw eTO Y&.&.B . JJeTO YODM. Eneio Yoeiaj NNCT- 

enejec. TGNOY qxo w.w.oq CBOX ^pooY. &.YOD 25 
K&.T&. ^e NToq eTeqxtw SS.M.OC xe txo 



CGN&.X01 CBOX <5^ptWTfi. &.^2^&. ^W. TIM. A. 
CXU) W.RS.OC Ndl TGrp^H X6quLUL&.Y N^l 

ulneqxooc 


iiivenit quod daret in retributionem gratiae (#ajotg) Dei. Cum 
autem accepisset calicem qui est signum mortis lesu, iterum 
(ndAiv) calicem mortis alacriter sumpsit in nomine lesu 
et dixit : Calicem salutarem accipiam <et> nomen Domini 
sinvocabo (n,eixaXet,=enMaXeZv) ( 1 ). Etiamsi (K&V) introiveio, 
inquit, in mortem, non negabo Dominum ( 2 ). Haec vero 
ita esse reapse, ostendi.t consequentia (axovhovdia = dxo- 
Aovdta).. Dicit enim (yd(j) : Mors sanctorum Domini pre- 
tiosa in conspectu eius ( 3 ). 

10 Bene (KoAafc) ergo fiunt calices vel (77) pocula ex hoc lapide 
onychio (6v6%iov), et .bene (ttcdwg) Beniamin tulit calicem 
illustrem eo modo (xard) qui dictus est : Hie est (*). 
Accepit enim (ydq) partem (pegis) suam quae erat quintu- 
pla ( 5 ) : * saepius enim (y&Q) virgis caesus est ( 6 ). Neque p. 391 

ispropter hoc tantum, sed (aAM) quia illis omnibus sollicitus (Ms. 392) 
fuit (*), secundum (%ara) quod dicit : Non ego, sed.(dMd) 
gratia (xo-e 1 ^) Dei quae est mecui. ( 8 ). 

Lupus etiam rap ax est Beniamin ( 9 ). Dicit vero : Mandu- 
cabit tempore matutino, dabit cibum tempore vespertino ( 10 ). 

2oDum (erei = en) enim (ydo) etiam turn infans esset aetate 
(tiJiyxia rifaxia) sua, quae computatur tempore matutino , 
Paulus e <tribu> Beniamin, qui est parvus de Beniamin, 
persecutus est (ditixew) sicut lupus, et rapuit et devoravit. 
Quando vero senex factus est, dedit cibum {tgoyrj) spiritua- 

25lem (nvEv/taTixij), id est doctrina sancta. Qui olim devora-r 
verat sperantes (eAjue = e^n^siv) in Christo, nunc seipsum 
illis tradit, eisque dat cibum secundum (xard) quod ipse 
dixit : Impendo et impendar pro vobis ( u ). 

Sed (<U/la) in hoc loco dicit Scriptura (yQCKptf) : Ibi est Benia- 
min parvulus in mentis excessu (exaTaaig) ( 12 ). Et non dicit 


1 Ps. 115, 13. 

2 Matt. 26, 35 ; Marc, 14, 31 ; Luc. 22, 33 ; Rom. 8, 35-39. . 

3 Ps. 115, 15. 4 Ps. 67, 28 (?). 5 Gen. 43, 34. 
6 II Cor. 11, 25. 7 II Cor. 7, 12 ; 11, 28 ; Col. 2, 1. 
8 I Cor. 15, 10. 9 Gen. 49, 27. 

10 Gen. 49, 27. 

11 II Cor. 12, 15. 

12 Ps. 67,28. 


320 


stss.8s.Te xe BeNiajtaiN . ^xx^ eqEw.^Y ovxe 
3&.nxtwc . &,2s.2s>&. nKOYi . eaox &.N xfcroq RG-.RKOYI Sweq- 
CNHY . ^xx^^EnTpeqxoocxe RKOYI .Neqj^.xe ^.N enjgH- 
pe Ni8Jcts)B sUneioYoei^ . &.&>&.&, eqjgkxe enKOYi ne e&ox 

3N ftetfUJULlff. n&vl TGNOY NT^YCOttTq N^G eii^HOCTO- 5 

f qB xoc . &.YCM rtW8<. erEwt^Y eqcg&.*2ce ^.N eYTonoc eq^i- 

Ms. fqf) TOY(8)C fte!XH*l. H WLWL^eiN NT&,Y9)!ie 6TB6 TM.NT- 

NOYTS. R.N necTawYpoc. M.N T&.N&.CT&.CIC . 8vYo 

C fca.cM.xcKoc . J|ea:&.q ra^p xe 
fidi &em&.)ULm n 

oYetccTdwCic e^qxooc XNTOK NIUL nxoeic. 
xe &.NOK ne ic neTeknHT NTOK Rctwq. 
ON 


nenfiS. GTOY^^B . R^e ereqxtw EW.OC . xe is 
noYss.ds.K5 ec t fiae NOYHYproc fieKe^NTmoH . rcov- 
cnoTOY eYts) fiee ffOY^owc NKOKKOC . NOYdEjsk evo fiee 
slnnYproc M.nxiB^NOC eqtfwcgT C^OYN e^p^c 
SS.&.CKOC. xeic&.c eqw^xooc. xe T&,ne ne ne;epc. 

CnOTOY N N8^nOCT02vOC. NB^X N6 T2Ll&,*HKe CNT6 . N- 20 

rf Sega,, ertgtwxss. Ne NMIOCTOXOC GTOY^^B slnNOYTe . rua. 

OYCT01NOYB6 NJSnHpe. 8wYtS) eTtS)cg 6BOX 

THpq xe &.NON OYCTOINOYBC slne;cc ^M. si*, NISS.. 

SS.N N6TN&.T&.1CO . &01N6 SS.6N 6BO^ ^W. 

nss.oY enw.oY. ^ome xe e&ox ^sl ncoN^ encDN. SIN 25 

N6TNHY SS.NNC8w N&d. fi^c^e F6.p SS,NNCdw Ndwl. N^E)^ 6TO 

NNeinproc eTpeYtpwi epooY 
BV.NOC r&,p slnslTO 
gTeTNSs.eeYe xe enw XNT\,Y xo 


321 

tantum : Beniamin , sed (dAAd) : Ibi es/; nee (ov66) : 
Beniamin simpliciter (dodo)?), sed (d/Ud) : Parvulus . 
Non quod minor esset fratribus suis, sed (dMd) dicen- 
do : Parvulus , non loquitur de filio Jacob illius tem- 
5poris, sed (dAAd) loquitur de Parvulo e <tribu> Beniamin , 
ille qui nunc electus est novissimus apostolorum (auioa-coXoo). 

\ Et hie passus ( x ) loquitur * neque de loco (ronog) prope P- 
Jerusalem, baud de signis quae facta sunt propter divi-(^ s - 
nitatem, nee de cruce (aravQog) et resurrectione (avaoraaio) 

10 et super ludaeam prope Damascum. Dicit enim (ydg) : Ibi 
est Beniamin parvulus in mentis excessu (ettaraaig) ( 2 ). 
Quando erat in mentis excessu (eWraprt?) dixit : Quis es tu, 
Domine ? . Et respondit : Ego sum lesus quern tu perseque- 
ris ( 3 ). 

15 Sed (<UAd) hoc alterum etiam in eo adimplevit eo modo qui 
expositus est, cum ecclesiam (%%Ar)aia) prae oculis habentes, 
earn beatam praedicabant ((jLaxaqiZeiv) per Spiritum (nvev- 
Sanctum, his verbis : Collum tuum est sicut turris 
eburnea (eAeydvrivov) (*), labia tua sunt sicut 

zofilum coccineum (xoxxog) ( 5 ), nares tuae sicut turris (ntiQ- 
yo?) Libani quae conspicit contra Damascum ( 6 ), ut signi- 
ficet : Caput est Christus ( 7 ), labia sunt apostoli (djroo-roAo?), 
oculi sunt Testamenta (diaQriKri) ambo, nares quae odoran- 
tur sunt apostoli (wioato^oq) sancti Dei qui odorantur 

25 in odorem mirabilem et qui clamant ad terram universam : 
Nos sumus bonus odor Christi ubique, illis qui salvabuntur 
et illis qui peribunt, aliis quidem de morte ad mortem, aliis au- 
tem de vita ad vitam ( 8 ), et ilia quae sequuntur. 
Aequum est enim (ydg) post haec ut nares quae sunt pulchrae 

W sicut turres (ytsQyog = yi^QyoQ) illae ( 9 ) nomen acceperint a Li- 
bano. Libanus enim (yd(j) in conspectu Damasci est. Memores 
estote huius, quandoquidem ( 10 ). 


1 Scilicet, Ibi est Beniamin... (Ps. 67, 28). Contortula sententia, 
quae in ultima parte vix sensum praebet. Forsan supplendum est : 
<nec de signis quae facta sunt> super ludaeam <et> prope Da- 
mascum. 

2 Ps. 67, 28. 3 Act 9, 5. 4 Canticus, 7, 4 ; 4, 4. 
6 Canticus., 4. 3. 6 Ganticus., 7. 4. ' Eph. 4, 15. 

8 II Cor. 2, 15-16. 9 Canticus, 7, 4. 10 Cf, BLAKE, p. 170, 30. 


LIST OF THE BIBLICAL QUOTATIONS 
AND ALLUSIONS 

(THE LITERAL QUOTATIONS ARE PRECEDED BY ANASTERISK *) 


VETUS 

TESTAMENTUM 

1,10 

260, 34 



2, 3-7 

258,2 

. 

Genesis 

2, 10-14 

258,, 22 

*2, 10, 12 

250, 18 

2, 18-22 

258,27 

2,12 

240, 19 

2, 25-29 

258, 41 

. 2, 12, 13 

248, 7 

2, 33 

258, 38 

30,1-6 

264, 12 

13, 2 seq 

262, 1 

34, 1-31 

298, 17 ' 

13,5-6 

262, 9 

35,22 

255, 16; 205, 

32,8 

262, 1 


13, 19 

34, 19-28 

262, 38 

38,6-11 

300, 1 


Deuterpn. 

38,11 

300, 3 

1,22 

262, 1 

39, 1-24 

298,13 

13, 6-10 

250,2 

41, 42 

306, 1 

*27, 12 

264, 47 ; 265, 

43,34 

310, 22; 312, 


15 


6 ; 318, 12 

27, 12-13 

264, 34 

44,2 

317, 17 

27, 12 seq. 264, 16 

49,4 

258, 16; 298 

27,13 

264, 31 ; 266, 


13 


2 

49, 8-12 

20$, 20 

27, 15-26 

265, 21-49 

*49, 14-15 

288, 21 

33,6-25 

264,2 

*49, 27 

315,. 16, 17 






Josue 


Exodus 

4,19 

265,6 

28,5 

254, 21 

8,33-34 

265, 9 

28,9 

266, 36 

13, 15-32 

254,5 

28,33 

254, 21 

14,4 

254, 10 

30, 34 

310, 9 

18,28 

312, 2 


Numeri 


Judices 

1,5-10 

260, 27 9, 7 

270, 14 


S54 



kuth 


Canticutri 

1,4 

302, 4 

*4,3 

320, 16 


I Regum 

*4, 4 

320, 1'6 

9, 1-2 

370,6 

*7,4 

320, 16, 17, 

*9, 20 

372, 19 




II Regum 


Sirach 

11,3 seq. 

302,6 

*25, 33 

298, 2 


III Regum 

NOVUM 

TESTAMENTUM 

16,24 

275,4 


, * 


IV Regum 


Matthaeus 

17,24 
17, 25-26 
17,26 

272, 15 
272,38 
274,17 

26,35 
27,63 
*28, 13 

365, 5 
376, 11 ,; 
376, 10, 12 

17,29 

272,23 


Marcus 

17, 30-31 

250,16 

14,31 

375,5 ; 

*17, 41 

275, 38 ; 250, 


Lucas 


5 

*10, 19 

256,31 


I Paralip. 

22,33 

375, 5 

2, 3-11 

302, 5 : . 


lohannes 

5,1 

238, 16; 298, 

4, 1 seq. 

270, 17 


13 

7,12 

376, 11 


Esther 

19,5 

376, 10 

2,5 

370,3,7 


Actus 

2,7 

370, 2 

*4, 11 

294, 44 


Psalmi 

9,2 

376,8 

*67, 28 

375, 28 ; 320, 
9 

9, 4 seq. 
*9, 5 

376, 15 
320, 11 

67,28? 

375, 12 

*9, 7 

374, 8 

*115, 10 

374, 1, 6, 11, 

9,8 

374,9,12 


20; 376, 21, 

13, 9 

374,27 

*115, 11 

374, 25 ; 376 

22,5 

376,8 ; 


7, 16 

*22, 10 

374, 8 

*115, 12 

376, 25 

22,11 

374, 9, 12 

*115, 13 

375, 4 ' 

26,12 

376, 8 

*115, 15 

375, 8 


Ad Romanes 

*141, 7 

374, 11; 20 

1,5 

372, 11;376, 


325 


*3,4 

314,25; 316, 


Ad Galatas 


7,16 

1,14 

372,26 

8, 35-39 
11,1 

318,5 
312, 7 


Ad Ephesios 

12,3 

312, 11 

2,14 

.296, 3 


27 

*3, 8 

316, 4 

I 

Ad Corinthios 

4,15 

320, 19 

2,10 

375,29 


Ad Philippenses 

9, 25 

298, 8 . 

*3, 5 

312, 24 

15,8 

316, 98 

3,5 

3/2, 7 

*15, 9 

316, 4 


Ad Colossenses 

15,9 
15,10 

316, 26 
318, 16 

2,1 

375, 14 

15,12,13? 

316,13 


I Ad Timotheum 

II 

Ad Corinthios 

1,13 

324, 15 ; 316, 




26, 27 

*2, 15-16 

320,23 



*4, 13 

314,3,6, 11, 


II Ad Timotheum 


20; 316, 21 

2,5 

298,8 

7,12 

318, 14 


Ad Titum 

10, 10 

316,1 

3,3 

316, 28 

11,22 

312, 29 



11,25 

318, 13 


Ad Hebraeos 

12,4 

316, 29 

9, 13, 

19, 21 294, 27 

12,15 

318, ^ 




LIST OF PROPER NAMES, 


242, 38 
kBOYMTHC 'AdovMrys 242, 

41 
*.Bp*.SajUl 276, 36, 51 ; 

302, 4 ; 312, 25 


240, 18 
&.KYX2S.&.C 240, 42 

, 8 
, 9 

&.M.eplTHC 242, 39 
310, 2 
242,40 

Nevgoit 256, 5 
\.plA.JNOC 'Atotvoi? 256, 6 

&.CIMA. 25<?, 24 

&.CCHNH 276, 2 

255, 47 ; 262, 46 ; 
, 17; 266,4; 256,21, 
42 

&.CCYplOC 226, 9 
246, 34 

vys 296, 
24, 41 


(T-) 236 ,' 8; 
270, 51 ; 276, 29; 280, 
17 


296, 23, 41 
BkBYMWNlON 236, 5 
Be2s.e3M.OOY6 Blemmyae 246, 

3, 10 
BemaJUUN 255, 33 ; 262, 

41 ; 264, 6, 54; 254, 13, 

3^?5, 9,11, 14; 310,2, 5 

6, 8, 20; 372, 7, 17, 25; 

375, 11, 17, 20, 21, 29; 

32^?, 1, 5, 10 
BepeNlKH 244, 24 > 38 
BepCXBGG 362, 6 

Boec 302, 5 

BOYFMOC 242, 42 


255, 26; 264, 12; 
266,4; 265,35; 254,6 
raaB&.?v264,41 ; 265, 5, 40; 
270, 1 ; 282, 16 

265, 10 
2P2, 24 
r&.pei?eiN 264, 49; 265, 
4, 17, 54; 252, 15 

256, 11 
256, 8 


242,43 

374, 7, 24; 
320, 9, 18, 28 


327 


258, 46 ; 264, 16 
302, 7 ; 308, 20 ; 

, 3 

&.1B6NOC 244, 1 
5UBHNOC 242, 45 
a.OM.HTl&.NOC 242, 20 


250, 19 

laad^aQ 260, 32 ; 
, 13,45; 254,11,53; 
255,15,21, 34 

eicenp 310, 2,7 


312, 23 

e*.e<J>*.NTlNH 244, 40 
GXY-e-p^., (Qdhaaaa) 
242, 26 

, 23 

242, 5 
235, 4 

272, i ; 274, 35 ; 

276, 27; 275, 53 
6CXP&.C 274, 44 
6THC Wry? 256, 3 

'660? 250, 25 

244, 12 

250, 26 

<pOaAsi/i 258, 
48; 2(52, 47; 264, 16; 
266, 6; 265, 36 
ev4>p^THC 304, 7 
ecj>pMM. ^5, 31 ; 260, 37; 
262, 42, 52 

246, 16 


, 5; 


44; 2.64, 10; 266, 5; 
265, 35. 

, 41 


, 2; 302,2 
305, 8 


1 

3io, 4 

255, 20; 302, 12 ; 
320, 4 

IXHM. 'IsQovaa^ 312, 2 ; 
316, 8 

ie;etftmi&.c 274, 43 

1C 'fyaovs 318, 2 

Ul^.1*. (T-) 242, 28; 305, 7 

1NXOC 242, 38 

254, 7 
258 ,4 
IH2S. '/a e a^ 260, 11 ; 264, 4 ; 

266, 38; 265, 14; 270, 

58; 272, 20; 274, 5; 

276, 32; 302, 2, 6; 305, 

13; 310, 5; 312, 19, 21 
10YA.&. 254, 13; 302, 2 ; 

305, 20 
lOYX^-C 255,3,8; 260,31 ; 

262, 12, 49; 264, 52; 

265, 19; 259, 20; 302, 

3, 6 ; 312, 5 

270, 

272, 


33; 320, 9 


10 

l(WCH<|> 260, 35; 262, 50; 
264, 9, 54; 295, 13; 
302, 10; 304, 11 ; 310, 21, 
22; 372, 17 


328 


K&.pei?eiN raqi&iv 264, 39 
Ks.p;CHXtHN NTG T2UBYH 

246, 30 
KHW.6 244, 29 
KICMOC 310, 4 
KOYAJMtWC 272, 21 ; 
274, 32 

274, 33 
, 22 


2S.6BYH " Aifori 290, 7 
2S.6NT1BHNOC 244, 10 
X6Y61 255, 1, 40; 260, 

42; 262, 15, 49; 264, 
' 8V 51 ; 265, 19; 298, 

16; 320, 18, 28 
2UBH A/fofy, 240 13 
MBYH 246, 31 ; 250, 15; 
- 288, 55 

tit 

WiaJikCCH 255, 32, 38; 

260, 38; 262, 1, 43. 53; 

284, 6 

M.&.PHC (peM-K-) 238, 9 
, 6 

310, 3 

310, 3 
WUM8J&ITHC 302, 5 
JUUMYCHC 264, 34; 274, 54; 
254, 5 


N 


272, 


270,, 53. 
274, 5 

272, 


52 


292, 23 
'Ivdta 244, 27 
270, 28 

250, 26 
242, 19 
NHCCHNOC 276, 23 

250, 21 

n 


, 31 

312, 7, 10; 314, 
28; 376, 5; 375, 20 


202, 2 


C^BHNOC 242, 44 


v 292, 


8 


274, 39 
302, 1 
C&.M.&.P1&. 270, 34, 36 
CcWL^plTHC 270, 11, 17, 

23; 272, 33; 274, 30; 

276, 19, ,21, 34; 275, 3, 

22; 250, 30 
C8JUIOYHX 372, 19 
C^OYX 305,13, 15, 19 ;370, 

6; 372, 19; 374, 27 
C&.4>4>^pOY6N 250, 2.8 

cew.ee! 370, 4 

$00,3 


329 


270, -14 
C1K1M-*. 270, 27 
C1K1M.&. (pM.-) 29 8, 17 
C1N&. 2-74, 55 

cip*.;e 298, 3 

ClplNXlBHNOC 242, 46 ; 
244, 5 , 

CltWN 294, I 
CKHei*. 254, 49, 54 
CKY6-1*. 256, 15 

GM.\.p\.raLiNON (TOOY rt-) 

244, 19 

COa.tMWtlTHC 302, 5 
CTJUL^^OC 312, 28 
CYftieom ^55, 25 ; 26,2, 11, 

41 ; 204,24,51 ; 268,18; 

284, 11 
GYytw'2',70,> 16 

cYpeew. 2^, 14 

CCM.&.eipHNOC 276, 19 
CtWWLHp 27<?, 40, 45 
270, 43 

280, 18 


, 42; 246, 12 

(HTOOY) 5<?2, 18 

238, 4: 


304, 13; 
312, 26 


4>ecioxoroc (ne-) 290, 10 

(Qetacov) 248, 45, 
50; 25<?, 8, 23; 


<1>YMCTMOC 302,- 3 

X 


KM%o? 256, 2 
, 20 

XQi<rt6s 286, 18; 29 8 , 
5; 30$, 15; 312, 16; 
, 25; 320, 19 

GO 


tre^NOC 240,7 ; 250,3,5 

n 


240, 29 ; 

, 58, 

2/6 8; 312, 24, 


25 


268, 8 
^OYNNOC Ofivvos 256, 4 
5P\.71HX 258, 36 
SpOYBHN 258, 16 24; 
260, 28; .262, 9; 264, 
58; 266/3; 265, 34; 
254, 6; 2J95, 11, 18 
302. 4 

244, 20; 376, 
5 

376, 1 


die 305, 14 

<tooj9 240, 2, 16 


LIST OF GREEK AND FOREIGN WORDS. 


316, 24, 25 


314, 20 

*.rtsm 298, 8 

302, 14 

300, 14 
*.KOYJM)Y$l*.252, 37 ; 270, 
46 ; 288, 15; 302, 11 ; 
308, 10; 374, 11 ; 318,8 
235, 14 

238, 15 ; 240, 26 
et passim 

ajia.eeecToc255, 7, 10 ; 302, 

15 

&.M.e*lCTOC 252, 30 
aJULG^YCTOC 288, 38. 
*.N&.rK&.lON 254, 11 
&m.CT&.ClC 320, 8 
&.N&.T1BOUC varefioQ nativus 

254, 35 

8cNp&.2 238, 3; 240, 10 ; 
245, 25, 27; 24, 23; 
250, 32; 252, 28 
^mVL^298,U;302,7 ;306, 
2, 6 ; 372, 5; 374, 17, 18 
anarsiv 252,21 
286,2', 312, 22 
&.HOCTOXOC 286, 12; 372, 
6, 10, 15; 376, 2, 4, 27; 
320, 5, 21 

ttd/Ufo? 254, 42 
272, 4\ 


250, 55; 252, 23; 

254, 21 ; 252, 20 

254, 51 

dQxatov 274, 51 ; 
235,18 -,292, 31 ;300, 
9; 305, 19 

&Q%eaBai 292, 31 
235, 17; 250, 21 ; 
250, 40; 372, 4; 374, 15 

A.p;aepeYc 255, 32 

%eaBai 306, 11 
250, 24; 252, 2, 
27 
&.CTIOC daretog 308, 3 

300, 8 
235, 20; 252, 33; 

255, 44 


254, 48 

240, 45 

304, 9 

BepH2v.2UON firiQvXfaov 302,10 
BepY2v.MON 302, 13; 304, 

5, 7 
BpYXMON 304, 2 

305,: 16 

240, 35 


TGNOC 275, 35; 205, 17; 
302, 17 


331 


rp&.<|>H 248, 41 ; 250, 15 ; 
252, 11, 47; 254, 19', 
258, 21 ; 270, 7; 275, 
37; 280, 48; 252, 6, 25, 
29; 296, 44; 315, 28 


282, 30 

286, 10 
, 14, 16 
296, 29 
&.l&.<>C8>p&. diayoQd 236, 1 ; 

242, 30 

X1K&.10N 298, 21 
XltWKei 3.? 5, 21 
XltWKTHC 316, 26 
^l^MpeciC 262, 19, 57; 
264, 27, 44; 282, 19; 
254, 1, 4, 15, 16 
Xl^epeciC d.iaiQeais 264, 31 
XO^OTHC rogorrjs 312, I 
,, 3 

fjid^siv 238, 
13 

Aoxtpiov 308,2 
316, U 
, 11 


, 42; 
1, 6, 13, 54, 58 

v 272, 25 
rt 274, 20 
61M.HT1 66 fjur) rt 284, 10 ; 
304, 18; 306, 4; 374, 7 
GIT*. 200, 31 ; 202,46; 264, 

16 ; 312, 24 

GKKMiCl^ 256, 19; 255,4 
320, 14 


6KCTA.CIC 314, 25 ; 315, 29; 
320, 10, 11 

, 1, 4, 6 
320, 16 

aiviy^a 258, 12 
250, 26, 33 
255, 39; 270, 37; 
300, 16 ; 316, 22 
6Hei-YM.ei Inidv/ieiv 288, 
22; 304, 17, 20 

enixalslv 318, 4 
314, 3 ; 316, 9 

encwwuc 254, 3 

epeWLOC eerjftog 256, 11 
6T61 en 300, 6; 315, 18 


310, 1,7 


300, 11 


H 


H n 318, 10 
305, 6 


242, 24 ; 250, 1 ; 
255, 27 ; 250, 6 ; 202, 6 ; 
302, 14 

.^&.CClTHC 254, 28 
$ep&.rtl&. deQansia 238, 20 . 

272,^53 

^YCias.CTHplON 312, 2 

306, 9 

275,29; 250, 42; 
255, 2; 300, 4; 302, 12 ; 
300, 8,, 9; 310, 5; 312, 5 


1 


27$, 54 


332 


IpHNlKOC elgrprnfa 236, 22 
loeig 308, I 


K&.S&.plC8LOC 294, 36 
Kd*e&.pON 288, 57 ; 296, 18 ; 

306, 20 

KM r&.p 280, 56 
KMItep 304, 20 
KMTOire 300, 5 
K8JN.2sA.mttm HcdActiVov 

254, 15 
K*.2s.tt)C 245, 48; 370, 20; 

372, 13; 318, 9, 11 
K&.N 266, 48 

K*.pnoc 300, 8, 11, 12 

K&.T&. 235, 15 ; 240, 31 ; 
242, 9, 12; 250, 1 ; 254, 
9; 258, 20, 27, 41 ; 260, 
23; 262, 33; 264, 46; 
266, 35; 265, 8, 31 ; 
270, 46 ; 274, 51 ; 
276, 11 ; 275, 34, 55; 
280, 14; 282,1,11 ; 256, 
23, 26, 47; 255, 15, 39, 
42; 2P5, 2, 18; 300, 5; 
302, 10, 11 ; 304, 11 
300,4,8, 18; 305,8, 10; 
312, 26 ; 374, 22, 28; 
375, 11, 15 

Kexeve 370, 9 

Kep&.YN10C 245, 27, 30 
K2s.^.YKON yhavxov 302, 13 
K2s.HpONOM.ei 262, 32 
K2V.HPONOM.I&. 262,29 ;254. 

5, 12 
K2s.HpOC 254, 13; 255, 27; 

372, 2 

K2s,HpOY xAtjQovv 288, 37 ; 
, 10 


KOKKOC 304, 7 ; 320, 17 
KOK^XOC x6%Aos 290, 2 
KOCJULOC 252, 18; 304, 10, 

17; 306, 3,4 
KO^XOC 370, 15 
KOY2vv.plON xogdMiov 304, 

6 

KP&.THP 235, 17 

KpOKOC305,5 

KY8.Nw2e yvpva&iv 300, 

14 

Ktt)2s,e KQ>Meiv 300, 1 
Ktt)2s.e&. 372, 22 
Ktt)CULGl xoaftsiv 254, 21 


246, 42 

2v.aJM.npOC (W.NT-) 2P2, 17 
265, 14, 26, 47 

aro>og 235, 6 
2s.lBepTlKON 304, 5 
2s.implON 252, 9 
XlPYplON 252, 49 
2UrYplOC 252, 7 
2s.oriON hoyeiov 266, 10; 

3061, 10; 305, 11 
2s,OinON 242, 17; 254, 1 
2s,triON AoyBlov 284,2 


M 

376, 13 
320, 14 
L8JC84>IOC 304, 21 
M.&.MCT*. 270, 48 
JUieplC 370, 22; 375, 12 
M.epoc 250, 2; 254, 52; 
200, 5; 206, 17, 58 j 
,302, 15; 305, 7 


333 


ileCTHplON 

29 

M.eT&.2s.2vON 246, 5 
M.eT&.2v2s.tN 246, 7 
M.6T&.N01&. 298, 21 


316, 



30 


17 


290, 


naQd 312, 8 ; 314, 


WlYCTHplON 312, 22 


14 


N 


NHCOC 244, 22 
NOIOC274,21,25; 
41, 45; 278, 33, 39; 

, 2, 52; 300, 6, 9; 

, 9; 312, 26 
NOYC 306, 9 


01KOYM.HNH 

4; 298, 6 


15 


292, 


ofaodopjl 292, 


olxovopfa 300, 5 
ONG^ION ovfyiov 306, 18; 

3JT2, 14 

ONY^ION 306, 14; 310, 20 
315, 10 

240, 23, 25 

n 


236,14,17,21 ;235,21 

256, 49 
315, 3 


IMJrrtWC 250, 11 ; 266, 52 
H&.pc 235, 2; 305, 1 
n&.p&.re nagdyeiv 262, 54 

n&.p&.a.ocic 312, 26 

272, 5 

300, 1 

272, 40 

aQeppohri 286,7 
295, 7 


274, 48 

254, 45 

256, 22; 296, 21 
7refc0etv 250, 29 
IUCT6Y6 298, 5; 314, 1,3, 
6, 7; 316, 21, 22 

nXavav 316, 11 
276, 14, 25 

tf 236, 12 
nv&vpa 320, 15 
315, 23 

256, 10; 255, 
2; 296, 10 
HN&.T1KOC nv&v par wax; 314, 

5 
noMC 235, 4; 270, 17, 29 

254, 10; 314, 10 
no^X^KlC 305, 16 
ItprOC ntieyos 320, 27 

npenei 290, 19 
npecBYTepoc 270, 57 ; 

272, 4, 49; 274, 8 
npoc 254, 4 
HpO<|>HTHC 276, 42 ; 300, 

10 

nptWC nQoQ 260, 45 
UptWCYNere nQoatjvey^e 238, 

10 

HYprOC 320, 16, 18 
HYpH2s.2s.OC priQvUoQ 252 34 


334 


250, 


34 


CMHUpOC adnyeiQoi; 250, 36 

236, 19 
236, 3, 5 

acLQdovvg 236, 13 
apdeaydos 240, 
25; 246, 15, 17; 252, 
32; 266, 25, 41, 43 ; 
284, 3 
CO$pOCYNH ocDyQootivrj 310, 

21 
cnepMA. 276, 51 ; 302, 3; 

312,25 

CT&.A.10N 244, 37 
CTMCTH 310, 12 
CT&.YPOC 254, 2, 4, 12, 28; 

320, 8 
CTe&.Ttt)M.&. 236, 15 


308, 16 


20 

avvaUayj) 


302, 7 
CYNPNCWJULH 

16 


13 


300, 

284, 


; 3J6; 2 ' 
(bs 314, 


T&.CC6 raaaeiv 266, 12 

-) r^Aetog 5<?<?, 9 


264, 42 


, 9 

TOttOC 236, 2; 275, 15; 
308, 8', 312, 2, 6; 
, 6 

256, 15 

Tpo4>H 318, 23 
TYUOC 274, 52, 56; 276, 

11, 15, 21, 45 
TYMOC (M.NT-) r^eiog312, 
12 

,l ,2 


376, 9 
4>&'P1CC&.10C yaQiaaios 312, 

26 

4>6Cei ytxs&i 308, 2 
<^CC10K.OrOC (pvaioAoyos 290, 

10 

<J>6C1C ^(Ttg 3J^, 18 
$OpOC 256, 3 
^YXH 260, 25 36, 48; 

262, 3, 28, 49; 264, 37 

252, 13; 254, 6 ;256, 9 ; 

302, 2,6; 308, 14, 20; 

310, 4, 6, 8; 372, 7, 25 
$YC61 270, 37 
4>YC1 yvaei 266, 49 
4>YC1C 242, 12 



310, 12 


VMS 248, 35 
;e&.pic 312, 11 ; 375, 1, 16 
?C&.YNiett)C xavvialog 254, 38 
vwiMroiN %avvov 302,16 
%oU<; 235, 14 


&v 290, 8, 22 
wov296. 33 
fo 300, 13 
;CpYC02aN*OC 252, 36; 

202, 11, 14 
;q>tt) 256, 10; 252, 14 
242, 22, 28 

Mr 

*|r&.&U.OC 312, 28 

09 


3/0, 10 


qT62s.2s.lON 240, 44 
& 

sao-ioc 372, 6 

3&.lp6ClC assorts 266, 9 
^cK2v(MC ayzAoJs 240, 26 ; 
316, 11', 320, 2 

delta 314, 12, 17 
voff 272, 18, 26; 
274, 18; 275, 18, 51 ; 
, 4 

nieiv 318, 25 
aiQeaie 270, 10 


240, 23; 265, 52; 292, 
19; 305, 14; 314, 28 


240, 18, 38 

314,28 
ia 240, 28 
vjyeptiv 308, 17 
laroqia 312, 11 

244, 15 ; 
276, 57; 2S6, 47 
3n 318, 16 

264, 
31 

266, 34 
254, 24 ; 288, 
56; 302, 17 

254, 14 
252, 40; 254, 
1 


238, 21 '. 

a 375, 19 

300, 13 

vjioBeais 298, 10 
<SYno*YClC 276, 58; 275, 
45; 252, 7 

o>o/w 245, 24 
235, 11 ; 254, 13; 
296, 37; 372, 10 
$orre 305, 5 
c5aTe 252, 45; 256, 
22; 260, 41 ; 272, 43 


kiNTED BY IMPRIMERIE DE MEESTER, WETTEREN, BELGJtrM 


49,30 

A i>eeLnegr0 


47,7 

&AAO 

45,22 


6)AAr*A.ni 68, 32; 70, 

29;7l,28;81,6 8; 

92,15 20 

><o* Ada. 49 , 30 

><*9 /U*m 47,21 {52, 
18;74,2 

Aq-u-lU 10,1 11 


9 A 6 A < * A Tni n o>-. LO 
62,21 bi$ ;78,24 

9 C A >\M j^ A ** c Q 'Jt 1 

vr v /* **\ "I " "* . . W *r A O W 

Antichrist 


57 


37,10 

ATOLW 69 ,21 6 is 
<*(^ 3 56,22 24; 
07, 18J59,6;88, 12) 
Ashcv56,26; 57, 5 30; 
58,1; 5 9, 3 11;60, 
18; 89, 6 
1i8*<> 

93,23 


20,7 


65 , 19 )A Y 
64,25 26;65, 13 22 


, 16 

451 
4,18- 


19;45,2 


g6*8g6 *'2}Jv/.Mic < n4 
28;78,7 11 13 23 


13 26 28 29 


12; 86, ,20; 88 , 10 
' 



70, 12 14 
i1i BoA% 
70,9;71,29 


8 **<?($ ^ 44, 18 34; 
45, 15;54,27;88, 12; 
89,5) G-^d 
1 3 5 29 


23 
g 

12 


27, 


20,8 


35, 22 J 58 6j 


?8,20;81 

*& tP**.36,6 8 16J37, 

11 6 32;39,8 2l;40, 

10;44,6;57,23;88, 12; 

69,6 

A6oj^i3>a>ue/49, 5 27 28; 
50,3 6 13 26 29 
51, 24} 62, 14 20 22 


tf*6% 9 , 1 
8,23;98;10,24 


9 , 7 J 1 3 , 2 1 


27 


ll; 

46, 


55, 
01 A$ 


. 90,12;91,26 
29;92, ll;93,9 
/ 45, 26 

l(/*h 3, 31; 4, 35 J 5, 
33,23 27;45,1 15; 
2 28;55,5;62, 1 
^ Oholia-b 36,11 
^ Eltska. 33,24 27; 

6 9 

'60 EJi j>Jia.nui.3 1 t 1 .3 

Als<M*K30, 12 ft 40 i 24 
^ Esther 78,24 32 
9 fis^m. 


65, 
40 , 
18; 
34; 


91, 


29; 89, 6)Zcbulc. 
25 ; 4 1,5 24; 43, 
62, 24 30; 65, 31 
88, 12 
JL ^arak 69,15 

* ^ I ^*'54 I 28 31 
^ SfracK 67,22 

i * i Jci 2or-ob6.be I 

28 


o 


13,21 * 


9 A ^ o TKctnar6 8,10 13 
16 19 '2 23;69,1& 
18; 70, 22; 7 1,26 
*a>*3 Q*p6<*K 93,24 

46,30 
1,8 


A 


6 9, 2 Obis i00.9* 



29 
60 

8; 

73 
9 

o g 
31 
3 


49,6 


. * w v ^ f ^* r- ^ w ^ -^ -^ ^ ^^ 

;50, 12;51,29;52, 


-Jesj-e 


70, 10 


11 


8 


24, 14;30,28; 
32,20 29j64, 15;76, 
6;81,24;85,6;86, 


V V () 

32,32; 33 

33;66,3; 

23; 82,34 

3*G a 


28;61,2 
62,6;88, 
onti-g onVg 
<J*t$*i-$ ion o^ 
64,32 


1 

70,30;71, 

;83,14 

27,22 
60,25 

18 21 31; 

10 


70, 10 

Aft <j * fiff 

28,28;32 
52 ,25 

\> i A J"o 3 

23,5;67, 
32 73, 22 
32lu; 76", 
79,23 24 
10;94,6 

66, 16; 73 

* *A 


69,31} 


26,22; 
, 10;37,22; 

^ r 22 , t* 3 > 

33; 72, 3 5 
23 24 26 
33; 77,4; 
;80,27;88, 
25 

L>A 45,18, 
,32 

65,7 


24,5 
oti^AP^I/ra-e/ 22,27; 

29,3;36,9;37,23;39 
22;40,20;42,5;45,5 
7;49,9;51 ,25;56,24 
2&;57,4;61,2;64, 
31-32;69,32;70,25; 


72, 6 
78,8 


; 73 ,19; 75, 29; 
12 14 16 23 

J803 31 


/ e , i 14 i o i o 
27 29; 79,29J803 31 
32;81,2 4J 37,33; 88, 
21 33;90,8 10 13 24; 
91, 11 12 30;95,22; 

<M. S* *^. 


< T 

3 1 ; 42 , 12 ; 7 1 , 19 
81,5 



25; 


48 


30 
40 
67 
20 

6 
88 


64, 32 
6 * 3 B' 1< A fadu ben /Yau 

,34;95,24.5 31 
Ju<lah24,5 19; 2 9, 29; 

; 

14 


u<a, ; , 

,3 5;31,29;36, 8; 

,9;45,25;51,28; 

,6b<slO 13; 68, B 14 
2?;69t 14 18;71, 
27 29; 78,20; 80, l; 


,10;89, 1 


27,12 


43,13 
78,13 
65,19) , 
20,7-8 


3*1 ieir/ 27,9 t,'i22 ; 
67,1 13 15;68,3;80, 
88,989 1 


, 

3;88,9;89, 1 
<*>930g^ n Ltir 


27,10^45,8 I 

>A*Le*A 54,28 30;69, 40,13 14 18 23 25; 
12 41,5 17 24 33;43, 

,A Lot 70,12 17;88, 12; 89, 6 


9 42rlO 

i 

|>P Matthew 68,14 

32; 70, 9 IA S ^TO^U/ 31,21; 
I*&W$& MoYdecal 78| 32, 18;35,2;39,27; 
24 26 47, 10;58,25;80,6 

I*6**P /VUnateH 37, J-Q 17 22;81,1 4 16 

32;44,4 14 30 33; 1 9 i 82 , 1 5 ; 83 , 2 1 } 84 , 

45, 19 1 13 14 32; 85,4 6; 

---*- /wary 63,23 86,8 15 

A\erArt 27,11 I 0y<ftP Teter 41,9^42, 

MesacH 47,6 8 14 

"13,33;22,26; * A^agP Ti/^te 73,29 




4 

24,26-7 


69,23 26 
69,13 
69,23 


\ 

^*38^" ) ^ a< *^ & ' 69,13 

Sd>1ifS Watson. 69 , 22ta <2 * | * ^ "R.a.l\A.b 69,23 

64*^ J6^6ti* Kebu.- 26j70,21;71,24 

cKa<ine%xAr5Q, l;51, 16; ^ * | * A 3 t 7^aAa.i 69,23 

52,13;90,5 8 9 11 *3*06* K&kecc^ 69,12 

14 18;91,4 9 18 21 i>D o 6^eaAen21 , 4 ; 22 , 10 

24 14 21 28 29;23,2 7 

G*9 /Vahat^ 32,34 9-10 11 14;44,1 3 

6 0*d8r ATerije/ 93,22 7;66,20 22 23 30; 

60<ilfS /Yro9, 12; 10,23 67 , 31 ; 88 , 11 ; 89 , 5 


,22-3 23-4 25-6 70,10 18;71,28 


82,14 


69,22*;* 
71,25 
80, 

t/ 45,25 

fc 69,12 

78, 12 19 29; 
80,29; 81,2 22 24 
8i?36A 1*4iKl*ti 49,16 
26 

47,6 


77,6 


29) 
\> * 


30 6 


o/o 


5* 

42,7 
63,5; 


70ill 


90, 1 
93,20 
33,29J 
42,11 

li A 6 A -a. SMfAxnokA 50,4 

24 

Simeon, 23,20; 
24, 16; 4b, 10; 88, 9J 
89,1 


70,12 


24 
9 


,15 22;61,27;81, 


< 
24J37, 11;38, 7 



10 11 18 23 30J73, 
20 2l;74,l 4 12-13) 
75,2; 80, 17;81,24; 
83, 17;84,2B;86,26 

31 ;86, 15 


g 6 o 
44,18 


15 17 


*** 

* 


flf 3 ot writ (?) 

*> ^? < 3 ( C'* 
t/-ns 


63, 12 

^ > ^"- '* 
10 > 


7 20 

24;10,31-2; 
23,27-28 

9 *%G .Anjaxon 17,8-9 

du 4*101 


9 A ti 5 A 1* ) 


1,28 


69,33 


aH 90,23 

^iioAA. /)i>a-bra 58, 
11 17 20 27 31 


? 63,12 


17,8 

Aro nit* j terraf"" 
tin-* j-t>v Arnon 44,8 

44 , 8 


10,25 

8 no 6 ^ffKX^TTi./o*' 

i>t /VNem^kis 15,24-5 


6,17 

/IS- 
90,4 


44,9 
34,14 


34,14 
11,30 


12,31 


ite* 


10,32 


6, 9 20, 5 6; 22, 7 bis 
llbU; 46,11 30 48, 
31i&l, 13; 64,24 28; 
65, 13 14 17 20 22; 
78,31;92,11 
> i n^w 3 6 0^6 3*by 'O>L- 
9 14 17;50, 

3;78,21;90, 
4;93,19 


9,14 

A ti 6 o ( 


49, 


9 ^3efKe/iin 63,27 


28 


44,15 


41,33 


11,12 17 


10,10;87,16 


34,13 


11,19 


10,34 
A 


9,24 
44, 10 


e 


5 


44, 17 
44,32; 


45,17 


6 

96,3) G-ilflftf 95,29 
5 A<A^>g AA&*lj|ee6 1,32; 

63,22;90, S;91,6 

a A6afi> eo-ugas 9,25 26 

5 6<bASA Oeriaim gg , 
3 8 25 34; 89, 16 21; 
93, 17 26 31;94, 14 
15 21 28 33;95,28; 
96,6 8 12 
3 g i 4^0 freb<xL 88,4 11 

27;89,7 17;94,14 
24; 95, 28; 96, 7 12 


41 8 10 


59, 

26;8l,2l;82, 10 32; 
85,2;86,2 9 


10,35 


10, 


4-5;92,2 4 


22,31-23,1 

Hebron, 69,28 

BSyt* 7f25? 
, 15;68,2;72,4; 

73,33 

Eden. 13,5 

A j?oi 93,23 

3 o nm A 09 A /"f &.(Tt ifr'th. 9,21 

27 27-8; 13, 8 
3 3<3**0 Eu|Hr<i,tes20,26-7 

4*4 (conru.y>t) 20,5 

g CD Aftfi S' Ethio|i&9 i 29 31 
g AJ A A A. t^t hco ti a 9, 

17,30; 10,20; 13,20 


9,35:3a> 
17,8 34,20 


44,12 


14,27 22 

36gi 

3<8 <^ AW 


, 12 
ttKt e.4 5 , 2 6 


* 5,35-6; 12,26; 16, 

** ThaAor 61,33 20 

a*A*TAe&aU 11,14; $mi*wJ 11,24 


7,25; 7, 13;63, 11 

1 A *tii Go K<nr/<>/ 14,28 

7,27; 6 *88*G* C< 

23,30J24,27 30 41,8;42,1 

fay Qepp-ofovrof 14,5 a^oa^G Ku.<ti*nf 90, 22 


A5 i<Rf>Ti C^/>vu S 1,6; 

14,5 

A A 3 4 6cDA% corr action jkv iji^og^o 1,1 

14,6 

44,12 r 
55, 8; 

88, 30; 95 ,27; 96, 4 10 <?*&"&<?*" La-vftl*-* 

11 13 (tomr./*) 17,8 

A 8r o A Jeyu. Jo./**n. 9,10 ^fl^a^p^^JjGa^Gn /.e / &'~ 

28, 16; 58, 30; 75, 7 J i,<.-n.t.ans 10,35 

76,23; 79, 31; 82, 18; ^oi*6ff l~eb**o*. 95^22 

84,34 23;86, 1 2 10 

9 i 3 3 ^5 i * A Ly bio. 19,21 

^ tfl " 25 ; 

X 

OoKnrif 1924 sj"5 ^ a^6 i. u ACAHS n, 

6 6 o Ioh,ni = Jon/a-n.5, 30 ; 1 3 , 3 -4 j 34 , 1 3 

I Ayttlt t]^^*^ r hr f\ **l *f 2L 1 C* ' 
Gfl JoYcia,*. 36,17 

18;38,33;44,2 15 9 


10 


34, 13 
9 A \ 3 * oo 6 o Md^5a,5.t *el5 , 3 

30 6 3*0 Or* 6 ^^/ > * / ' - n ^ 
15, 25J54, 18; 73,24; 

77^6 


63, 12 

44,11 


22 25 26;65,31 
6 g *i e><^ot /Vea./J<5/'> 89, 

28;94,21 31 

45,23 
34, 
14 


6 0^K o Ta./ ^~ 
89,30;90,7 


So. AJC <x 


58,32 
90 , 


32;91,3 


1, 13-4;5, 1-2;89,20 
25 26 31 32;90,2 3 

23 28 29;91,25 31; 
92,8 12 14 18 21 

24 28 34; 93 


8 14 26;94,1 3 16 
29;95,21 


34,12 


45,27 


Side. s /a. p. co r- 
r /4a 14,17 
o<or> 6 A SicLen. 62,32 


10; 19,6 


96,9 

\ir>n9g<>6o SithemliesQ 8 , 6 

W6 AA Sma.1* 92,1 

1io6o SJoH 28, 17; 

31,3l;40,3;63,30; 

64,3 

V *& 6^i 3 6 3^6 Si'rin~ 

11,4 
17,6 


7 , 4 


. 70,3 

t> 3 9 <ft A Seme voy 

89,34;90,28i92,26 
So mere 90,30 
89 , 35 
63,15 

6 i 9 y g<-)o Sh.u,n.<L.tnite. 
55,7 

jjg^o SicAem 89,23 
28i>/s94,24 


29 


* 3 * 
10,34 

20 1 20 

n T60LXI 23,33 
A i * n ^.T5eT('as 41,22 

7,14 


O^ 


rvot j 7 ^ 7 


8 


27 

09 ft &) A \f M A d tn o A rKl 

71,27 

oj A Ti 9> b rM Sotv 9,17 

19 20 23 24; 12,30 
32; 13,2 6;28, 1;32, 
27 tkis 35 

2. ft C C *T>' . -^ 

9,23 26;87,16 

M^ I ^ 

42,20 


j ,> 5 * 6 3<^6 o 

".92,27 
^ 4 ^ 3 g ^> 6 


ar i, . y 

10 > 10-1 


14,27 


93,21 

<&*% 060 O\r axing 1 t 3 3 


i 


3 i& js> H,iYeur 81 , 7k$ 
o 6 ^pw i g 6 5 Hin 
11,3 

n6^g I-h^ift. 7,15 
21-2;9,16 28;10, 
14-5 21 27 28-9; 
11, 13; 13,20;23,23; 
78,2 


10,32 


63, 14 
1 1 , 1 
63,13 
33,33; 
73,25;89,31;92,7 


* * * * * 
**** 
** 

* 


69,27 


3 fcotl t o 4 
(04) 

vQoC si-t*. M QO 11" 

4 v D slTr* e. rv. Of,OJl, 

89,10;95,10 
15,4 4 9 6 h.n.te 94,27 

40A0n<g 46 he/nce J-rv't /i 
6;9,34 35; 79,22 

10, 5 -6 etc. 4934<&04346g&4.fl, 

44030^0 ea.j 18,35; bride. 24 , 4 ; 42 , 29 ; 

55, 1 87,5 

40<&i346 ^<XY, lcr<ly 3 3 } 4Bg4|<^0^4^t. vt\iserlin.*5 

17 24,9 10 

4%$4^)<ft notle. 77,10 46ga^%o aYvjtl 33 ,30 

^ O3 ik V A jl Cf*^ ^ ^ ~W l\ OUi ^1% 4% fC^W*l 9 O A A Cf*^C? ^* %B^ ** A fl A Ct*V%d4*l ( * 

3O O O IL/A 1 *2 4 T 

{ I 6 & H^ OO,1O 

4 01 4 V A one "trKou$a.T\l2 6,30 * 6 o>^> 4^0 *v6(*| 15 9 

4m" 4|>Yl H^ 56,31 

95,14 4^9-g^n WXW.YK 1 2 > 7 - 8 

4 09 (9 CO ^ 90(J^ ^-6"-Yte.frK 68, 4<fttl064A &ubjt4>iCe2 6,2$ 

23;6,4;21,14 4 V A me^bev , K** 5,6 

4lj J y u-i>ev 19 , 12 ; 
7,7 59,34 

6,1; 4w'j|<* r to d-ujKtg\f 5*1 ,25 
8,17 20i9>22 27;67,4; 70, 1 ; 77, 

6 40 a^te. 10,2bii 21; 78*24 

9i 16, 19-20; 19, 1 2 <*>u6*VUxiK}' 13, 17 

6 7-8 14;56,18 IS; *03<? 9 * A H*>,ft 
67, {59,4-;60, 18 16,17;32,30 

5 R S t\i? Lirov 6 ! 4 ^ 4 Acre i Aitfcdr 23 , 

13,29 4 ? 4<S0i4A confer 

12,4; 19,23 1,25; 36, 7; 42, 33 

6 , 1 ; 14,20; 16 , 19 ; 4^i^)^3gi4A glow, bUie. 

19,15 16;20,18;60 18,26 

22 23;61,3;62,5 4^5^3^402. Au. r H_ 12,3 


A* 

18,21;19,17 92,14 

set u.p 13, 31 ;55, bete. 12 16 

A^qigcft 9 A A arise, stand uj>, A^tfA^g' 

38,19 2 1 ; 39 , 2 1 efcc- A>TJ Aluft^^oe-n.^. 32,7 
A A COK, sect-He 11 12-3 

3 1 ; 2 3 , 1 A^tJA^aSgia^ n struct tore 
*.3*al4. fid 64,5 

3, 35;5, 10? 7,4 A>1i<r3AA 90 .u-fe 47,4 

*A colUfit 18,9 A^WTXpocomeu* 81, 31 

9 A<%a> ^ A A erect , vise Amti^'g^a ^ ** complete 
30, 15; 40, 7; 76, 14 53 , 24 ; 54 , 3 ; 58 , 2 lft 

<> 9 AM^*a ^ A A eliVote AmtlAadAA Surt.lt u^t 20 , 

28, 17;46,3;47,3tc. 13 

^9c^f6AA bring , lead. u/ A ^ (33 400 9 A 

53,7. 19, 17;61,5(see 

4 7, 12; 94, 19 A^MgAoB^a i A A ^Ij .)> 

<n91j * 3 4^0 fioijt 27, 18,8 

29 ; 34 , 18 ; 88 , 31tc> >^5^^tib9 

,o>ne u| 5 3 , 1 3 68,27 

cow.eu.ji 5j f A^Q ^ AA( 4 6Y &(*^d 

6 10 t*K,v^moir<,o|.c- W .7 | 19; 

3 AGa^AJL le.<^ u^> 18, 15; 25, 8 13 etc, 

53,16 20; 76, 19 *^ 3 d 6 i AAConltyuct 

18, 32, 16;62, 14;63,28 

.etc. 

6 33; 52, 34; 76, 1 

n60^AA^rur A^^J^AJ 

4,35;23,l-2 22;92,16 

22 26;69,6 64,14 

28,2 A^)^W B AA wei3^ 8,5-6; 
12,22;25,24 


17, 
33; 82, 3; 93, 15 

(<?)**'* 3 *t 28, 
16;32,13J61,33 

91, 7 
40,27 

*0 i/0'*' 4,20 

*f yidur 1 , 22 ; 

4,19;5,21;10,35etc. 
A^ *^ Keur 32, 9 

47, 14; 48, 11 etc. 
*-b V M.Vft.ur, i nfcAV 1 6 6 

w ' A W , V* 

*J* 380** 60,13 


etc.. 


4 


33 f 


> A i ^f 6 A ^o</3oeXoS 

54,20 
iA 8 C'(i> 31,9i 

85,21 26 
1*306 A sacrificial a(Uv93 , 1 6 


13,23 25 

4 S J A bathe , ba.th 29,19 

80,26 

"t^, 13, 

16 

j3^>6 p8e\\tov 10,7 

12 13 


60,31;67,8 


, 10 
28,33; 

16,20i 


62,22 23; 66, 12 

51 , 22 

31,16; 

93,8 


20 33j34,2t> 


; 14,9 

b,oL,eiri/ 7,9; 
37, 7; 38, 4 


32,2 
eir/V- 

42,27-8 
96,6 
, 24$ 


74,24 


22; 17,22 25 etc. 


aye 
3 A 6 


8,12 
A brfjkt- 

6,18; 12,2 


,22; 
10, 18; 14,7 etc. 
i^) 5g OAOA >at.ro,l 

65, 10;92,18 
33*^ teryl 6,3; 

20, 16 22-3 24 25; 

66, 11 i 76, 30J 77,3 
7 12 13 

6 A i'cL-20,15 
12,33 
18 


Yvou.YsKn\-nt 


40 i 22 


* 3* tine*: 14,20 

g A!? A w 'fc o stone-cutter 7,16 
g A 9 he.ca-u,je of 1,23; 
90,1 


t-rtk 12,5-6; 19 18J 
4 1,20 fete.' 

n G 40 g & A 

34,8 

n G g A & s Kie -JwtK 
30, 11-1?;31 ,30 etc. 
g A 9 ^a o 6 5 i AA -flow 

26,7-8 
g A 9%*?<o4A 

57,2;58, 


lvet 10, 1.2} 16,8, 


5, S3 26} 10,21-22^. 


58,19 

ASwiUgooa^*-*. futout 

26}1S,23 30 
t> 2 A JQ. brfiet durn3 t 


54,24 

ddoi&Eg 3 4 JL <li||-creMee , 4 

21 , 18-9139, 25;41 , 
32 etc. 


36,16 
g i 9li * 


47 f 4 . 7Q f 19 

o test 


67, 19 


33,2;35,33;60* 19 

g A 3Vi5jo g SL 30 jovft 

10, 8; 12,30} 13,5 etc. 

54, 29 
6, 

21; 13,32 
g * 90 3 3 fl i A A kouwe ,4.*>ert 

14, 11;21 ,9}33,6;41, 

19 
g ^Swyj ^w 3 AJCL 6/o.ze 

20*22 


g * 9 J * 6 <o A ^ j) 

cK^e 57, 16; 78, 6 

g A 9ft j 8 6 4JI JH5ert, fiit. 

6, 7; 77,22; 86,22 

g A i<) 3 &A4L 

38,28; 57, 


74,30 


vtu.tr.' me ht 


74,23 
g*9 w ggEAA v|/eAy 

24-5}41, 14} 45., 3.4 
g A 9 R h 6 ^ ^ A A >n*e e 

5,2-3; 11, 25; 26, 11 

etc. 


7,3124, 

g A 9g 3 9 A JL 


a 
6, 18; 7, 33; 8,20 en. 28; 6, 7; 7, 29 etc. 

\ 4 9 w Q fc ^ t? 3 ^ 4 A YWrcfrl,ftH 1 ***' ft AGnanGdoAA S t A.t. cotv 
32,9;34,30;35, 12rt<. 88,7 

I 4 9 J n A 4 A. SfcCX Out $ 4 6 qp$ ! 9 ^> g A A A VCITO It 

15,7-8;16,1. lOttc. 58,12 18 

|49f^0^4A torvcte Qto-t ^AG^g^GAA }>u.Y$U.e, 

36, '7 43,14 22;55,27 

;49f>^>n^^4A of 4*Y w-^ a^^^^*^ A<fi * "^ t>w - r *Vv 40,32 

46,14 a46o>4jti^j^gi4Ai:o 
l *9^g^4A N foY3. * libterot* 74,19 

20,25-26 g 4 6 g <ftg i 4 A btomturkitc. 
1 49V i 3 AA -jxJYtvft-y 27,16 

15,26;25,9;78,6 a 4 Go 4^0 ddurw 48,21; 
r 4 9^ < g 9 4 A tft-ice out 84,11 17 

53,18 a4Go^04A 
, 493 <c4A $o^.TtK32 , 35; 70,21 

48,31 ; 52, 22 etc. 3 A G 6 AQ g o A A become <t 

dG^Yom.by 1,1 3 etc. 5 4, 2; 71, 7 

18; 65,20; 84, 12 61,24 

46JA64A b<xtY\e 26,6 ft 4 G ^^J 4^ 3 4A 

47,13 73,28 
22,8 13 15;45,5et<. 45,23 
67,33 6,24;8, 13; 13,32&t-<. 


87,12 82,11 17 

g4&<^4(r>g&dAbe |>Yu4, jutrt4ct 

81,32 
g 4 G 9 4 &0)<">g i 4 A ju-fti&y 

21, 31; 29, 32; 36, 12 22 , 19 ; 29 , 8 ; 64 , 1 1 J 

68, 19 

4Ga^Ji4A JeYvgtKen. 1 , 5 ; 2 1 , 31 ; 22 * 6 t. 
41,7;42,26;44,20^c 5 469641 

5, 64,9 


i AA become. 
5,10-11 


* 6 


36,33}79,7;80, 14 etc. 
* 6 9 3<i0 fc A increase 
4,7-8;59,20;69,25 


51, ll;74,31 33 

AAto become 
9,3-4 6 


75,10 


20.30-1J86, 18 

*6 AflB^J i A A (for ^ A 6 6 

26,26 32; 2 7, 3 6,tc 

34,35 
12,5; 

15,33^6,29-30 
4 6 & 6 o i A A escape 

22,24;26,4;37, 


52, 12 


46, 9 J 48, 3; 54, 4 

-fall 60,20 


ireltou-s 82, 2; 85, 12 
A CV*fef 6 9^ corruptible 
48, 7 

*6^*y6A cond.evwn.30 , 29 
* 6\^3 A A ^otKro 26 i 13- 
14;55, 13 


33, 27; 60, 29 30 
A 6\9 * 3^**A instruct 

82,2 6 

6j) 3 K 3 * A st n , J>ell 3 3 f . 

50,4 29;51,5 

* 5yg i * A m-am ttfi 8 t 1 8 
E<g o 6 A e*|*w<i f s|rea.<i. 

29, 10;77,28;84,25; 
86, 14 
.* ?<g <ft1> 3 
55,21 


18,30;34,33;35, 
* 63 3 6 9 i AJL cUet*:, 

72,17 20 21 


24,18;50,21 
* 6g ^ *A U*r;le 

1,21 29;a, 18 

giAA arouse, 

;49, 10 1 

strife 

83,3 


13-4; 18,8; 
27, 5; 32, Z 4 e.K. 


14, 11-2; 16, 16;20, 
31; 43, 23 

test 46,32 


6,20J32,22;26, 15 


67,26 


75,11 


35,20;47,15J49,28 

etc 


61,36 


A .fl. 


29, 14;30,35;59, 12 

etc. 


41,3;80,23 
gASf0fcglA.fi. oy<t<Mn , 

r*iy5,28; 6, 5 6 ctt. 

5 A 6 $ n<>g I 4. 4iirid , 

88,17;94,13 
5 A6^904pA. clean, 

18, 10;26,2 15 tc- 
3 A 6? 6 AAfi'.rc 27,17 
j*6jAi-j)^6g i A A ye-Ket/ 

oWs yflu-tu 84, 13 33 
3 * 6 Jj JtCat t (e<rY43 ,22 i 

53,30;76,10 16 

g A 5 ^ <o 4 A. >u // ^f , /-/ay 

l?,2?-28i37,31 
5S^9<^A C\YJ u)i 5 , 12; 

6, 14 
36VEd,& loose 74,2 

g A^<*AJ'3^3 4-fl- Hr/iet isUnr** 

37,4 

g A<3lA<Uggi*ja. csW 5 , 1 

, 12 


, 24; 50, 6; 
6 j i A A 

50 , 34 

a A<o*<>lioAJZ. Come 

38,32 


23,24-25 
A 9(j 3 A-ng i A 
^"t-rwrtijtnttte 39,8 

A&^o A 

32,12 


17-18 


a 3 
72, 1 ;8?,23 

A ^ ^ A 1l^ 3 A A.C>ft *, 7,27 


36,26 


26, l;30, 13 23 


39,19 

*$>*$^AA 9 <.OWK 4,27 

A 6 6 A eAc|.t , btt-t 26,14 
A^g9 avo^-Ha. 8,7; 
19,4 16;20,3 &tc. 

9 A ClVCitM- 

25,33 
12,34 


5 A ^ g 


5,13-14 


^ 57,16-7 
, f OVA$ 9,28; 


*^ '** 17,16 

% AA TPaA 1 , 16 18 

37, 12;82,34 

g i A A. Q-tt , tvi*.no-je 

24, 10;46 ,9J 088*^ 
17 , 12: oa0 i^A 72, 8 


|>olj*n 41,21; 

71 ,31 


25, 
6 g 
6?, 


60, 
1i 


9a A dija. 

25;26,8 29;27,5 

i * A befoul , defile. 

23J6B,4 

50,18; 


9 
A A 


7 , 32 
65,14; 
9 ^ 


22,12 
41,1 
4-5 


21 , 
13, 


Kone^-combgi ,4- 
i*4t mih.dL 4,30-1; 
22 ; 22 , 5ttc.-.tot1in< 
19; 15, 14etc. 



5,42 


37,11;57, 

20;60,14 

-g j 3 * Ji.StTJKe ( lxait l -toTt*ve5 1 > 

30J52, ll;76,28 

15 <. heart 15,21;28, 

16 ; 35 k 7 etc. 

oo I -g8* SL feel 11*3, 

, 16-7 j 24, 
8; 27, 25 etc. 
'g^ftti ^ 3 AA. (invj>vAeti?<fi 

34,22 


, 6-7 ; 24 , 

12 ; 44, 3 2 etc.: 

fe 9 nil tl * 

4, 15;l5 

UTO ^ * /* ^ lv 33 ,32; 

39,15 

71 ,5 ; 81 , 8 


crown. 7,30; 
16, 13; 24 ,3 eta. 


A I A A trill 0.35. 
4 1,2; 48, 34 


15,4; 


48,34: &enc$is 9 1,31; 
92, 17;94, 18;95,26i 
fo reat24,25;39, 15 
*iA64^giAA *tb e-Ktd.iv j> 
30,5 


34, 26;35, 8; 81, 34 
l9*>l *SL tiM,4. 82 ,25 
29 30 
ii^jjiAJL nest 17,30; 

50,22 

asA 84,15 
* * A Cvoa> ' |rt ' 

34,3 
> ^ <o <} * -a- iet, /*evt 25 , 

2-3;35,28;40,4 
.i^ a c>9iA. ^tanc^35 , 31 ', 
72,3;79,35 etc. 
A<ftg^w9*A. ,yt^n<i 33, 

24 31 


6,16 20; 15,5 
A<T) 30 i AJLtfttcre48 , 17 
4 3 6 g i 4 A suffer 84,5 
Aeo9() & AA Suffer 87,3 


A(D 


90*33 
w 3 D 6 3 > A t VMHM-C 

60,5 15;67,33 
* 3 3 *%< coYvujJt 53,12 
A^nl-jXpn jtefj>ed 94 ,28 J 
95,13 14 16 


27; 2 7,1 
*A^3 AA 

53,7 
*53 
16,6 


/ay 52,30; 
d<p tt atu|t 
ca/lecf 84,12 


, 16;82,9*tc. 

60,5 
, 17 27 


64,2; 75,3 5;94, 10 
9 * "8 <S A> o \treft-Y''e4l , 1 6 


32, 11; 39, 6; 81,30etx. 

A^^jxo^jjiAA Aarcll 
40, 19 24 26 etc. 
* 9w<ft 8 o^>0 i A it obey 5, 
25;58, 18;59, 


15, 12*3;30,21;32, 8 

etc- 

48-g\n63A sUy 38, 

20; 46, 20; 55,29; 93, 

9 

7,9 

8 , 8 

8-9j25,29;26, 11 


57,13 

^ 0^ D A A abol^/i 76,2 9 
s-ister 68,4 

/slant 35,1 
seize 68,2 
*^*6g i A A coil 37, 11; 
57,21 

**6'*e^ 5, 7; 19,3 
* *^?T) 9 3 * Adftstrojje 1,29 

Alli9n fcfcJiTiiiiK^ 30, 

2l;31,3i;32, 7;59, 

29i63,28 33 

*\ * 3 < fNtfb 9,30} 

12,34; 13,2;27,31 


12,28;57,24 


78, 10; 86,20 

* 1l r **n4 , eo^ A yl 7 , 7 J 55, 

10,89, 13 

i AJL( ^ * W 3 ~ 

72 , 28 ) vWi$t<n, 

72,27 

7 , 1 8 
35,32 

A Ai.oU 51,17 
A^ f^Uttt 49,11 
t> % 9 A 0ci> HAra3 1 , 30 J 
40,5;95,30 
*08 S3 * *A/eQ<re53, 27; 
83,26 

60,14 

5 ,20- 

1;33,9;35,11 17; 
87,20;93,27ef<. 

48, 3 6; 


82,26 

*3^3* Art "*'^ /t50 31 32, 13; 41, 6; 54, 7 

68,17;93,13 <A J 6 *$ 9 T en. 12,29 

I $** finite 73', 3 4 <p 8 9*A set 77,9 

5;?6,32 <c 8 94JL StA>\l 9,3; 

f*3 9 6g i AA sto/> 48,7; 20 , 34 ; 26 , 28 etc. 
74,26 

1,6 

,19 


16,5 
12,4; 18,20 


70,6;79, 12*92,23 
*3^65 

48,18 


61,23 

4^*3 3 i A g.t b|K2 8 , 

9;34,20;35,9 
A 3 g 6 g i A A $e.tir{e. 9, 

35;906 24 37 

A?aj9*A vemaK 18,1; 

86,32 

*^*aO*A <^nenth 18,17; 

46,2 

*3 A JL Condemn 4 7 > 25 


67, 13; 82,24 

5 UAr<!l 73,30 
AJi. 49,16 

o^-iie 20,9 j 

21,4 15 25 29 etc. 
<?*?3 9 3 *Acus#2'2| 17 29 


dA <x/jot 36,15 
*j i6 AA Joo5e 32 , 17; 
39,20 22; 48, 4 etc; 


18,27;49, 1} 


1,13; 


3 ,35; 4, 32; 5, 2 

8<?* 
1,4 


35,32;40,4;58,24; 
68,1 tc, 

6*^K v ^ ae 81,23 
25;85,7 

nG5 d sin OH: see 

^o d tioSf6 92,8 17 
o ^^0(00 /t, d e 26,20; 
43,20;66,9;77, 11 
ft<p{) & & glor^ 33,20; 
39 , 16 ; 47 , 17etc.:ai 
glorify 33 , 14 ; 42 , 5 


o^o 3vea.tl, 11 ; 4,32 ; 

5, 4; 9, SOett. 

o^^wSft etc AC OK 42,10 


9 

6^ 

11, 


92,2 

silence 79,^4 

7,4; d, 12; 

3 <? 


o <j g (*>i A <o g v g Jo 9,13; 12 , 8 

3 *? ^ <? 3 un * ' ' t d *y 3 2 tit- : 3 ^ <& 3 1* * fc 3 ^ 
73,20 tkui 7,15;73,25*. 

3 3 1 ; 1 3 , 4 etc. 

3 0^ O c ka.vi oir 4 6 , 3 ; 8 1 , 

10, 17;70,22 31; 82, 13 

jo<mt*cH 13, 3 ^ -g ti A *Jx 30 , 34 ; 88 , 2 

17J91, l;95,16 3 7 17 18 24 25 etc. 

,6:3363 g33* 6 o deiri) 38,13 

,25: 3e^^ 22J43,21;55,27;59 

tk<*s 12,28o3a*j0* 14;75,4 
14.4, 2; 5, 6; 22, 14 

33;28,32;29, 

g 6 A tK3u9 ,24; 10, 3*-fl- <X/AS/ 76,8 

4 ll;15,13;87,l 6& c . 3 * 5 * <R mercKft-ht 5,11; 

gS1i 5 wl1o bi^o(> 7,20j23,28 

1,3 8 faij 3 g ^^ 9 i A JL beseecfi5 , 23 ; 

g ^8 *^ 9'B^ 1 fift<j(eol)etti"w) 60,2;73,9;90, 14ctc. 

46,5 33^0 fc/^- 89,4 14; 

46,5 33^* uri/oC 16, 4; 54, 

g co o owe^l , 2 4 b.'s J 3 , 3 3; 1.8 

1 , 6 ; 1 1 , 5jttc.;i? ,17; 336 * $ <rin C yA-ri 49,11: 

65,14 33^*J**^ 93$g<?3 

g <%of> 6 4 JL ktiiotv 1,20 i * A vine. AV> CUT/HA 61,18 

22;32,23 33*^ v^vn 58,9 

g <Si o/o/l,army4 , 27 j 28 , 38J^*> |*> 1 *itHet 90,33 

8 15 18 J 30, 3 - 4 .**< 3 9 ^ *i n 4Lv.^on20 , 23-4 

g oil CD 4 3 A )>vince30 , 5 : ggQ^^ft <Utrer 24,21: 

26; 73, 30 o**fl< <xirarce 24,9 

gl 3 -3 *<^ 5ucK 9 , 34 ; 3^>^3A U<M 37,20; 

12 ,15- 16 etc, 57,22 23 

4,31 3 6gi4A J-u/fcr 18,17 


22 24; 46, 4 9 12eU. 


* 
93,7 


74,23; 


19,29 
l3ft.fc.kaL 95,31 
7,4 


, 12 ; 34, 

22; 35, 27; 36, 19 etc. 
% ?<nti(eiifl 7 , 1 4 ; 3 7 , 28 : 


29,20; 
51,8 

*A f.art 24,8;64, 12 
* He sits 37,34 

8igA e^Y.li 5,35;8, 
16 17 19J9,19J 10,3 
16;ll,9 22;14,4 9; 
15, 17; 16,19;27, 7 8 
13 15 29i28,3 33; 
29, l;41, 18;88,20 
23 


5 ^ 
16 


64,28 

IJ^Aw^A^g^AA 

43,32;60,25 
> 9 o oil 4, 10;8,27 

33;92 3 6 
>gt>, 63^0 utjsof 32,13; > 

47,3; 54, 8; 63, 4 


11,10 

rm 9 443 , 10}54 , 

30; 56,28; 60, 9 etc. 
^4%34A t-YMH* 4,26; 

5, 3; 29, 21 etc. 

79,22 
14, 13 

25 

A sea. 10,25; 11 , 
14;12,33; 14, 15*c. 

61 , 


14;76,9 


1,14; 5, 
30; 6, 17 eK- 

oo A 3 A HeeJL* jKmvn.c't 13,6; 

iA-95,6 14, 13; 17, i.56tc:vfiex. 

31, 19 23;34,5& c .: 
V w 6 g 
7,4:* 3 

9, 10-1: 


8 1 32 : 3 1i ^ a i * A 
51, 19; 58, 


f the wntei-3 0,20,31; 
32: 4 331D * 6 ti (jg 9 *A 

OdLore , jrsty.t5 8 , 2 2 J 6 7 , 

8 ; 8 1 , 3 2 etc.: > 3 ^ 9 - 

j^Q i 5 A jiu.tbflYhn<85 , 9 

A 6 * *0 

65,9 


$ &a.rer 1,8; 


4,7 

09 A 6 4 9 A 3 

58,30 
09 * 6 A 9 


^ e //o ur- 
81,15 


29,23;64, 13 
4 6 4 3 3 4<> * 3 

tftfxe*. 49 , T9 J 5 1 , 32 
o 4 6 4 3$ w< <. +ti4er2 9,23 


OB 4 6 4 3 P 
oo*6* 

0) 4 S * 


6,1? 
1,16 
3, 17 


4 A 


31 


40, 14 J 56,24 &tt. 

to 4 & g 9 4 6 of mjj/ttfoi-l 0,1 


8 

03 Aco/ioney 1 6 , 31 2 1 , 5 
UrhLte 12,5 

6, 12 13 14 
3 3*0* 9 8*~ 
fxyoi 11,3 
17; 57, 13 
85,21 34 
13,24 
o n OD r> 01)^*4? a,cA 1,19- 

20J 4, 23; 6, 5 etc. 
09^ 4 A. cut, /iec<r(.s0>tej 7,16 
as 9 4 A. A a./ v* 1 6 i 6 

g^n5ho<irl5 , 1 26 > 3 6 
TJ 4^0 eye 8,10 etc.. 9*>m, 
Jewc/ 1 ,6; 4, 9 1? 20 


tor* 50, 19; 5 1,3 
3itse(<*ciecl)l, 14; 6 i 29; 

18,14 17 etc. 
036 AQ urftkoM.t 32, 17; 

37,19;70,19 
3*A *** 1,6 27; 7, 

3 ; 8 , 2 4 etcs 3 1 4 3 4 6 

fehasr&te 1,11 

*> J 3 * 4 A sy, t^ax 1,2 5 ; 

4,29;?, 8 etc/, Jirei. forms 

"Vvx^sijty "'JTP'M fftftt*> 0)3 T) ** 

8, 26; 9, 20; 10, 11 etc. 

85,20 


0> 

o 


3,31-2 34;4,4 
09% ^(o o *&te.//,reUte 1 5 , 3 
20; 9;28, 18 


, 30; 


66,14 


24-5 29;34,11 16; 
35,5 12J40,6 8;44, 
23 28;45,32;46,24; 
54, 13;56,14;61, 12 

o A 3 A & 3 n<g 4 A yb/a.K^er 


A 3 
74,6 


. 9 _ v 

4% J 6 /<u/>er 5,36; 


6 * / 

14.2 3 29 32; 16, 15 6 06 66 /o^vov 16 , 27 
40,11 12;41,16 26 6 0<UicU/ 46,20; 

*0*6 ttm 17,18 55,28;90,25 etc. 

03*30 f><vrfr*/e 37,15; 4 06I9V *t-jj60 o *A 

38.3 -4 et.. fYXW7pt/c. 46,19; 
o9n0 tKenct 17,14 ctt~ 55,30 

OOB H P"> O (tTtl'6 A-t 56,27 4 ft W ft. /l<t/r^ Jl^C. i A^,(T, /n 

0^Gff r//ev 59,34 4ir*<t/^5 , 10 ; 12, 33 etc, 

&B 3 0. o *<fi. hotryourrtt ss 6 ^" 3iJe. 13,1;32,6; 

83,26 63, 21; 64, 16 


75,17 23;80tl9tc. 
O*A ken 26,12 
cliff, crag 15,22 
21,23;46,28 23 30 32 ; 1 7 , 14 fc.v 

1^36,24 ,^<?^ 1 060 ^Ace o|eUff 

9,22; 64,24 

13,10 6 9 *eno^l,23 , 14J 96 , 17 

*6 * 3 t<tb erna.cle 36,12 ^6060 )jttl , snv * u 18, 24 

14 32 $<&3*A bm* 74,30 

*0oyv>an 17,12 21; i^-g^jg * 6 o badj 742 

18,2-3;21 ,8;34, lOft-t. 6^J*r3* 
*Q0o*A hn>wA.x<tu2 6 , 1 5 ; 73,27 31 

72,17 20 23 26 & 6l A^-g^vg o *A 

,32;55,31 66*30 /*>Ai7,7 34; 
^60i*A<r- 18,1; 28, 9 

,19; 55, 30 6D* 9 r *n.K 14,24 

* JL "tb A.j^um ^'j) *6aao "fcam'c 16, 13 

1,24 6 T)<? otA '/ 16,9;54,15 
^utnan.1 , 22 ; 19 

34,26 ^^}geo0o*AC u.f 6,22 

( 09 A^io ^ood. 13,9;22, 5^960)^0 it o.jf' ,1*0*1. 50 6 ; 
24; 2 8, 12; 29, 20 etc. 51,8 

lurtfttis 1*8 79,3 


3,35; 

4, 34; 22, 6etc S AT)*"- 

Sm^of 80*94 85,18 

$6gfc*A Kao-l 6,19; 

2 2, 21; 25, 2 2 etc. 

3 3 j i * A tnaYire/ 16,10; 
35,4;45, 19 


22;67,9 


16, 19 
4, 1 

33*6 

10, 19 


8,1 


8,28 

55,22 

o St0n,W|cUY 8,31; 

64,2 

14;37, 
20;38,7 8 10 13 

3 * A f>tci,j 5 , 1 9 ; 5 5 , 
9 ; 6 , 2 $ <j*w Q 3 <* j <^ 
eg A * & 4 , 8 ; 5 , 9 tf 

6,1 
15, 

6 7 12 13 14 19; 
16,3;43,27 28;44, 
19 25 31 33;54,13 


15 17 33 bis ;56,1 11 

16,24 
16,8 


9 


9* < o r i0roLce 1,11; 

4, 5; 27, 30 etc. 
9 * ^o^o ^ * AtHft-HWj|itig8 3,4 


39,4 


47,17. 


20, 7; 22, 


17; 54, 8 


i)20,13; 62,15 


22,28 
95,33 

43,6; 


13-19; 19,23 
9 * & *<i> just,T53kte^5 ,14; 
22, 9; 35, 16 

9 * ^^ 9* 

9 9 

r{ ft Vttoa> 31, 
13 


19, 5; 21, 9 11 13; 
77,27 

\e 92,17 


34 , 4 


m, Kerne! 2 0,2 2 


9^-gbft tongs 31,3 

9 *4fe 3 . Keet>, observe gg f 

12;47,29 
9 * %^[ a 9<*0^ 'keft.cheT 78, 

27 

26,4 
28,17; 

32, 14; 83, 27 etc. 
1 044 6 <& ^foveat, qvovego t 1 6 

I S^ G l X 1 MM A Ku*t<i*V ft B% 

6;31,33;71,21 
Id^nGtVveK 18,9;82, 

14 
) AQca-g^o tev*,yiter 76,6; 

82,24 
^ *0^ 3 *<& 5<nr'ottv 35,17 


26,22;28, 17;68,32; 

70,9 

*fc<p 3i 3^ ne^r 7,20-1; 

9,29; 10,32 etc. 

6, 22; 96, 2 
on tAe r/yn! 32,13- 
14;34,2;54, 8 
A^yTJOSP r^tA^nJ 35 , 33 ; 

88,26 

ffglfcr 79,28 


10,28; 11,27; 14,30<&. 
i<^^ 3 n 6 g At-ng i * A ^/e<Lfn, 
brill i^ce. 8, 19-20 J 11 , 
32; 12,9-lOetc. 


21,13 


, 7 
, 1 S } 


9<?03**nj 

83,5 
9 ^ o <o > ^ n Tfch. 21,1; 

&0,19;77,21 
9!6AA9 Tiirer 9, 17-8 
20 23 26 etc. 

62,20 
elecrentlv 

68, 16J81,32;88, 15 


77,14 19 


34, 30 

40, 12 

e/etreu^A. 


62|29 


66,12 
906* 3 9 


62,32 

9gftoH6' jfoartA 6,1-2; 
29,27;30,7;62,21 


29,31 

0a 

16 


, 35 ; 23 


0*90 
14,29 


5; 35; 


14 


38, 18 

9 y ft rtiore ; In. Cynyt. ^rm5 , 

19; 7, 2 26et<. 
90'8<g6' K'HJ 16,12;25, 
2; 35, 2 6 &tc. 


9 * A *f*j4W' 58, 
18 ; 66, 24; 67, 32 ttv 
^0 Mng 7,28J8,27, 
9,8 llttt. 


8; 38, 10 1 Sett, i a 

73,33;78, 14 
9|g tig^d^ at ante 50,8 
9 8 3 3^0 see-tut* 4.3,28 

9QQ&AQ4&A Knowing , uir&Y& 

10.4i57,5;75.,i9tt, 


5, 7-8;26, 18 
830^^6' nintk 60,23 

9 <J * 3 o urHove 69,24 

27 30 
3? *9T)^A re<t 6,10;7, 

11 33525,33 etc. 
*$*l*V fifth 36,5 

9 < b6>Jarv 9,29} 12,34j 

13, l;27,29tc: %1i A 
V A 3 A<O east 30, 6 = 


20i21j33, 19 
4ee/t/*c/ 9 i 11 
A 3 A c/ue/ 30,3 7 


31 

9 oo A A thount-aot & , 30-1; 
9 4; 10,22 25 


61,23 

3 
82, 13 


81,33; 


ye/.tey 9,25 
o 44, 16 17 


9 A 
28;31, 


32;53,34 
9 A g i A ansurer 

49,?i50,9; 75, 


18 


42,3 

3 o (5 9 * jtt comeiVel 7,16; 

54,26; 63,26 bit e.tc. 
9 ^^ 9 o^jo 

63,23 
3g* 4 yj Aewce 4, 35; 

9, 16; 29 i 3 &*<-. 
9 A o i% A OB 5 

16;67,2;68,20 


63,5;90tl4 

A%0%A veasoa, 

8,26 


4,14; 

86,25 

9 Acofc * w i A A retoawt? 3 , 22 
9 A^tAtft 6 A )rr/e- 11,16; 

95, 12; 96, 12 14 
9 A 9 A ^^ i & xi grant 5,4- 

5; 29, 11; 31, 15^c. 

9 A 9 4 (ftoo ttT(vto,-fowar4i ^ 3 

12, 20*22, 23&t e . 
9 A 

51,13 
9 A 9 TO <O' 

29, 6; 85,29 
9 A 94 9 ^ g i *A^ATC/ 

e 45,9 


9 A 9cg g 6 *A $j>ye<tcL Jutker. 
and. t kith ft v 35 , 14 

991|3 A gtl fc *. ttK^K 

4, 6; 6, 16-6; 30 i IBetc. 


18 


6 ft V A j g 

20,21 

9nJ **,& jttfrl 82,2? 

9 n$3l AA jti*18, 11 
20,20-l;23,21 

9nT)9A,fl. offer 7>2?J 
58, 


11, 13; 12,9 

9oti9g 6 AJL Aer 51, 15 
9 nli^-fl^o oory? weL 1 , 1.5 ; 
18,3 

79,5 

(} Q 

" TJ V f? v w 
4,31 

39, 10 
9 ft(g g 6 A SL. 

3 1-2; 32, 35; 33, 16&c. 
9 rt jg r> 6 A A. irfnjr 12, 11 
12; 17,27 

8 * 3 6 & 3 * A ve tlAyi > 91,6 

9 (> g i * A. to.Ke,receiwe3 ,30; 

4,6; 6, 19; 7,22 etc, 
9 ojrj 3 4 S g i A JL I>)rin549 ,10 
& J e // 7,19 


26;23,27;24, 14et<. 
9gg A Ui, on 72,6; 

82il4 
9o d g 9 AA give 1 , 12 J 

7,23 27;23,30 


91,24 

A eeurt^ 57 9 11 : 9 

i g 0SccitUb57, 10 
9 of j 3 6 AA oiYKiu-e 29, 

24; 49, 4 9 11 etc. 
9n$D4g&4. be 
7,2 


54,9;63,23 
9 ftfe g <o 3 J,A looKat 28,4- 

5;33,21 

jL allot 66,14 


21,16 

e 38,18 
30,30; 
75,3;76,14 

^AD^^O* Undof <le43 3,1; 

48, 19; 53, 32; 55, 6JU 
9 ^3<o^i A A "heritaj* 

36, 15; 44, l;61,31&c, 
34lJ^6'*n UeeK 6,19j 

7, 32-3; 8, 4 14 etc. 

94Q &xte.*.d.f -to 20,3 

9 ^w 6 a A WiV 9 9,11; 
10, 14; 63, 4 5 

sA 76,31 
58,21 

o 6 g i *A 

60,11 


91,29 


53 


9> oo 

9 w 

29 


4 A fcri'hft 

,20 23 

Q<3if? urkltisK 

g ti 3 . ^ our. 45, 28 
9 n 6 P jat i*t;g 7,23; 
, 14. 3oo9o6 9 i AA 
68,8 25 
1,21 

79,28 

4 10 
*12; 95,33 

Slay 22,3$; 
,5 18 

71, 


11 
f *, 
74 
w^ 

12 


28;23, 11;43,8 
9 ^ <* g i A A wait 7 1 4 ; 

93,33 

3^^ *ti /^oXc)(^s 6 , 26 
9 ?> 3 * <ot^i g i A .0. gv<xnt , kestow 

5 18;31, 12;35,.36 


82,23 


3J73, 1 


i 2 5 
72, 


20,18 29;27,32 

9 f o a -3 ^rU.Vk5 7,10 
3 5 A A slwre, 4*yr<\>tt 1,29; 


6 g & A A i/Airery 52,28: 
<xs verb 9180 
6 A f n^P Mavr 63,16 
f>lun<iev9, 10 

//CV 17 , 

23 >58,30 22 

^f 3-5 60 believe* 31, 

14j32,2l;43, 13 


9,4; 10,23}80,23 


co\vtrer*e 75, IS 
71,5 


17 


WXOT- 


47,26 


struct ive 6 8,12 

3 * 
73,2 


22;23, 15-16 


, 32 ; 
, 4; 17, 

84, 21 ; 


11,1; 
44,34;45,20;75,21 

, 2 
2 8 , 
9-10 12;30, 16 


10 

y 3 3 3 i A JL f 

l;66,.10 
6 AJ 

87,15 


3 6 , 
, 29; 


UTOVK 


4A 

62, 11 
40,21 
57,14 

6i bar, bolt 53, 29 
J 6 * A bfitx^ , leadL 9,11 

10 14;63,4-5 15 
34A rett.YK 4$, 

22 ; 53 ,29; 65, 16 

Q i 4 A receive ,*.*. l , 
12;5,17;8,27 
g 3 *Sfl *4Afern3l ,17; 
90,5 

/oire 46,1 


46,27 


24,23 


6,28-9 

W003AA g(re 4,4 

39,17;58,11 13 


83,6 


32, 

g i * A ^nornt 6,23; 
19,10-11 

9 


67,2 

9 TO J 50 73 A&A teoeAer42 ,15} 

85, 11 
3 J^> -g 6 A A 6riihjr 76,34 

3w d ipD <S1 g i 4 A doctytKe28 , 

7 11 13 22;41,7etc. 


49,2!; 

52,3;76,29 

disci |/e 1,28-9} 
5, 15-6; 38, 26 tire. 

8 36 4A arrive. 45,1; 
47,15;68, 18 etc. 

23,26 
91,12 


id.< 84,22 
3 4A<t-n.fcY*e 9,20 
27}13,7 

*"80 o fc-jxpo c/4ev go, 7 
11 16 32 *< 

15,21 
83,34 


5k**t 17,14 
3<6 4 3 4^> ii*.Hy ( Tnt*th 5 , ^4 j 

8,3 29;9, leto: 


3 ^ * 3 4^* ^ 4 3 Iox 5 24 , 

3^434^* tl4t Vtoultif'ri , 

15J56.3; 61 , 10: 3^4- 
#0* often. 64,29 
463 i A A a-n^ey 

57,28 

27,30 

49 v 18 

78,8 ll 


31,2; 


92,33 


60,8 

g^o,/u^e 6, 6 28; 
36, 9; 37, 2 etc. 


P^ A 

ft 61,21 

40,10 9^3^4*5] 

/fMjfinufwr 7,5 62,16;68,28 

12 ; 11 ,27 blti 12,22tfc. *y A* *Keer,rtee> 17,14 

6 ,27-8 5 42 ,21 etc: *s 9$<3 90^n I A A /a.bv 
irerb 3 ,31 ;30,20 61,2-3 

9tiA3*(0&.4, surellittg 6 , 93 j ^6* -fref-tef^l 33 , 185 

21513,32539,23 53,21 

^r/j 9ft<9Ai-*j 18,20 22 

60,1 10579,33 24 

38, 3038^3uard7g, 23 ;90, 
23542,34584,10 15 20 31ci<. 

38,15 90,30 

ygtft n ettem^ 34 , 34 ; 60 , 90 *^ /i f ti/e 5, 6 \ 96, 6 

15;67,8 9 d A^g^A 14. 7,24512, 

5,31 32 23;13,l8ttt. 

64,16 9 J ^i A 3 <ft A iyrant 74,3 4 

9 2 1 ; 10 12ett 9j^A3^g^AA iyt-A,>my 
30 /4.18 ,2 ;59 , 6etc 38 , 165 57, 7 5 74, 5 

3 fl ^ ' f ^- 12,3 * ^ & 9 && o & & i A. i 
de5tvo^53,i8 67,17;79,21 

0a<^ telly 6,29,20, 9JCX&A <o.yyi'onl7,32 33 
13;65,24 35;18,6 10 

17,13 95 A*P 6(itv 
57,11 74,11 

16,13-4; 9^3*^3i0^,A kerttfc. 

21, 16; 28, 15 etc. : 42, 12 

4,18 27523,4 14-15 22;61,27 

gift* 9^ A*J}^ A ru<i(i^i4 , 20- 
5 i*A^A./y/erfAai 28,4 2 1 ; 2 1 , 1 ; 7 7 , 20 

m i^ 9 ^" i * A ^yiesit\oo<L 9^ n ^ o tne.ti c 11,1 

27,10 18; 29, 17*^^- 9f)j 4 66' jreefeg , 17 20 

auro-xe. 29,13, 27 30;9,5 


03360 green Co/or 

54,21;57,9-10 

D * 6 3 <^i9 < 9reft>u irejet utiav 

7,1 

3*r 6<l tl M 85,21 
22 34 etc.. 

fK&^herd. 53,32 
in order 13, 2& 
tb grate 38,31 
&o t>hrin ti&Q , 1 2 
j*5fH 29, 13 
24;43,5 

; 71, 


be9etth30,26|34, 2 9 etc. 
3^<5; Sh6u.id.er 88 ,20 26 

29 
9 3 4a 9 o anta-gcni st 37,10 

31;&0, 12;69, llt. 

9 ^ 3 (v * ^ o >no utit94yoUicr3 7,13 

3 & 3 A A'li Ha^tl 9 * 1 1 i 4 3 , 
2; 71, 31 etc. 


43,14 

9 3 i^a.5ls,cmifeYS 16,32 
9^6 efcya.re,irivtttous4 6 , 3 1 ; 5 3, 


67,29i68,l 

9 j 1> 6 J^ 3airioay 48, 5 J 

63,32; 72 , ?i 80,2 


10, 26; 11, 15; 


6 A8<rIight 12, 13 16; 
26, 27 30<fc: 6 
9f9009g^o Jt 

33,4;66, 13 
6 Awjti * 3 oaftte.t-rfi 

4, 23; 10,31; 11, 19eft. 


56,17 

3 * 6 8 * * 
4,3 


6 A 


87,10 


12,2 4-5 15 2 3 etc-: 


3 


5 14; 12, 7 
30 critvwb 41, l 
3 ooritij 3,30- 
3i;22,9;2S,30 

6Ayoilj V\A.tiirM3 16,34 

6 *^^g * g 3 r<nvA*4 4,7; 

52,34 
6A a <g i> fruit 38,27; 

40, 21 ;49, 11; 71, 18 


63,4 


56,32; 57, 5 etc. 
8^ft ^*"*Ki 56,30 
6 *3roif> ^yogewy 55,22; 

69,33;70, 1-2594, 6 
6 A <3(i>9 A locbov 84, 6 

5 * 03 bite,-stii. 3 19. 9 .ll 
12 

6 3 isjo* 4j IYX st . 0.4. |3 7 

32;54,28 31 


82, 18i94,7 
6*?33*" s|eefik 19,30 
6 4^ n^ slxAYe 30, 4; 37, 

31; 44, 5 etc. 
6 4* I gy J>o.tYte.Y<K 95,8 
E g ^ 44. wittjWisK 1 , 25 ; 3 , 

34; 4, 4 19 tc. 
5 g ill no de soi 70 , 7 

79,2 6 14 

41,6 


41,3;49,1 


|> O r te \av- 79,8 
, 25 33 
8J35.34 
1,11 20 29&c. 
Soy A 3 i * A moisture 7,2 

19,30 


console 28 ,4-5bf,; 70,4 
G-ggog^giA Af**M 57,15 
6 *) 3 o almond. 8,29 


w ^g Bjast ,b*t 7 , 3 ; 1 1 , 
15 16 


; 13, 6 etc- 
w1 3 4 6 lv\fu.v 5,28; 

86,21: w^ 6 3 ?3^ ft 
^ar5, 31 J 22, 2 
ccot 9g W Q A eight j 11,16 


^ A a stole 18,19 

ntaro 30,16 18&tt.: 

^ 6 A 30 botk 32,7; 
40 , 30ett.:<6$fl<R JA 
33 both 32,21; 64, 

8 1 7ett-S 0^8 4 6 intaro 

88,17 

*<> e*glft. 17,29-30 

35; 18, 7 11; 46, 27; 

47,2;53, 7 


fift,j.turo 96,11 

J^wAgald 13, 8W$ J20, 
3; 39, 11; 58, 11 


20,2: o 


64,23 


75, 13-14 


, 19, 


75,14 
24,21 ; 


f 3 


3 *y o 3 o KOKOV 35 ,* 
31;36,26etc. 


1, 7; 9, 14 21 etc. 
34{joroV6gi..a. Honor, 
uroTt-hiKt5?5 ,16 13 Ct*. 

* 3^HC fod.*i 15,1 
3 gy hea4, chief 57,33 


o 11,17:5. 
19,5;85,20 


. t-Q 3* 6 A iirory 63,6 9,1 89 5 24 , 1 ; 25 , 6etc. 
6 d A to War 9 ,12, 


3 A3a<?Afirst &i27 33; 
ll,22ete. : S A* 3 (^be- 
fore 3 5 , 1 3 i 5 6 , 9 etc. 

S A A Yrt OU.th j ^ft,c 6> 12,21; 

26, 22 28, 5 2 6 etc.: 
5 A S A 19,24: 

s A* s A 88,30;89, 


11, 12;28,2 


16, 11} 61 ,;8&, 13: 


35,30 

A93 d 1*4. 66,24 

31 s 
66, 


T)beat,aAoy39 ,3: 


bestial ferocity 38,9 
036 A A find. 4,21 31 ; 
6,9 17J 7 13 15 etc. 
57,10;6C^ 


,31;95,32 

Swt ^ M, \ 4. A C^I^P A OQ* 

71 fr> |V O w U 4 ****'* O 9 M 7 

11, 18 20; 12,21; 
92,15 


jj 4 9 A tVme, hoi*r7 , 3 28; 


6 A <j,u<xtttu3 7,2; 

8,3 8; 25, 19 23 etc. 
AAV utx. 7 , 7 J 8 4 , 6 
3 4Awratk30, 17 25 

26;74,11 

A Q o ^j v\ uw. be v 3 8 1 ; 5 6, 

20; 68, 13 31 etc. 

A A B A A 


85,19 
16,34 
4,10 
6,25 
_;7,6 9 13 14etc. 

E D 3 A A Choo$e,diiri4e49 , 2 

80,6 12;84,34 etc.. 
^311^0 ^ AA Aiffeyenccg , 19 
0fcH3&AA S^^^e 87,5 
A believe 26, 19 J 

33, 13; 46, 17 etc. 


* < * 6 3 
11,9 


47,13 


15 


32; 12, 18 


3^ 3 
27, 5 etc 


34,15 

t 11,22 
26,23; 


26,13;59, 

31;89t29 

1i *% 9 o meckjuvc, 3 , 32 3 
t) At^g^A f OQ<1 57,31 

34 

27; 192l;44,6 10 

*U6 1,17 
i*3 77,20 


21 

* 6 

14 16;66,4;71,13 


53,30*76,10 16 
*A^^830^ ^moKe. offering 
10,13;?9,1 3 4 13 


30, 33 J 3 1,4-5 etc. 


6,20;59t32 


7, 


Vvouvirl 


42,2;85,14 


27; 66, 5 

4^n8w i o jj <ft o Aive^SecL 8 , 

10-ll;25,22;65,24 
4 9*i3ie'tvfc l fciev53, 1 9; 
64, 2; 73, 28 


20 21; 23, 8-9 etc. 
* 9 A lj t bvee Ku-ndr<4. 3,32 
A9 3 iwdeeA 82,21; 
83,20 


13,32-3 
900 <p,> *OA seventy 

10,7;49,7 

* 9 g ^)<3 o A royal 31,18* 

35, 28; 36, 23 32 etc. 
*9o threa 38 , 1Q 1 9 etc. 

A^^ * < go orncvwicvt 16, 
12 28;36,19 33 etc. 


65,23 
A 9 5 

36, 2J 41, 23; 44, 7 etc, 
49)jg^ gcLYtnentl 2,12; 
72,5 27 28 29 etc. 


36, 14 31 33 


16,5 

26,6 
34,19; 
93,30;96,9 15 
V A 6 ^ I O.Y.S ) 12,1; 

26,29 31 
tf A 6 *o^ar ^^^^39 , 29 ; 

46,30 
t*i W3 5 

44,20 

8,10 ll;20,12 

V A^^ofto & o 5ar<Uo%v5 , 34 ; 6 
8 9 13 16;22,1 2; 
6 7 10-11 20;23, 13 


f I 

w 

6,25-26 

22,30; 
66,27 

i4,S 6 P rniYYov 11,23-4; 
28,25 

20,3 
4,16; 

5,30 31j6,5: tee, t*~ 
* i 


13,21-2 
633*AJtt. faith 
28,28;30,22 ete. 

A \J A Sooi^jS 1 jflunv^-jfca-iKrf. 

85, 19 

A^I 9 3 6 g<if audibk 

89,3 13;95,6 
4ti33V4A \\c\e. 2 9 
20;54, 10;58,9etc. 
Alj-g 9 3^0 cttj7, jobUt 21 
1-2; 77, 22 SOeto.. 
9 3 


26;23, 


ee 7,23 
, 17 20 
\ , sJ^tv 1 6 , 


* T) A T) 6 8^ etetual ,'itj 39,24 


the Loret-'i 28, 
32J31, ll;48, 17 

*<g itlfi* trflLSwv 39,14; 

81,3 

<g ^ 6 o ( )} iog n^f^Sn 

30, 15) #// re 5,36; 


13, 11 12 14 15 24 
25; 14, l;30/19 21; 
36,4 5 29;37,4;39, 
9 19140*2 3 8 
i A8^*30voitr73 , 29 31 


58, 6;81,30 
' A*Q Tj o 33 ?* " 
30, 1.4 21 31 etc. 

,16 
5, 12 
, 7 ; 4 , 7*c. 
tj A w 3 (^ 09 w A. divi & 12, 
29; 13,4; .15, 15 cCt. 

"185,27 
62,27 
| A2'[|A<Rg<^ be \e>vt, A. 

79,20 21 26 
14006 A?*> AbCYYivlft 30 , 30 

33;51,4etrt- 
iioo6fl(^ofli^ji, T eY yo Y 

1 7 , 1 9 ; 5 1 , 8 1 5 etc. 

I A <) T) A IT" bltu-e.l Q . 1 9 I 2 4 

3 32 H' ^ A 3 ^j 3 4^ id- 
12; 85, 19;94,26 


22; 21, 15; 22 , 3 etc. 
A^w-g^n "tevnj*v 67, 
18 

A /s 6 d "g A oaarA-re, Conscious 1 4 , 

26;294;56,6 etc. 
i^wA deposit 25,5 

^O 1 * 3 * 3^"* unjjive>it 79 , 

9J86, 13 

A01*3A(ft ft-nima-l 16, 

2~3;38,30;54, 17: 


A 6 A : let 3 


38,23-24 


30, 20; 31 ,31 etc. 

A ^f * <J g ^ <&tsi'rabl0. 1 3 | 2 8 


36, 15 32 

A J9g r Afol5731; 84, 

19 

j-g At> o e.uui*ck 58,22 

A* Ag i AA 9<>s|el 35, 

15;39,27;43, 13 etc. 

Afc PfoYn,aJ>Jearo.^cel , 28 J 

12,8 24; 14 ,10 113ft. 
*b 0^kawi 4 , 23-4; 26, 
6,11 net*..: VA! g^w 
<pg i * A oil ,ttYn4, 7 J 6 , 
1 2 etc jljA 


,11 

70, 

, 7 

77, 


24 


13; 85, 14 


relation sKiV 39,3 
i A &<"> A KQI.S. 5 9, 17; 63, 

29;72,2 
A $ 9 A A 

3, 33; 4, 9 2 6 -7 etc. 
i A $ 9 A & g o A A neeA 87, 18 

1 * $ ^ * 3 t>iou0KA taiA3 ,33 
i A $ V A i^ o Vansont 31,7 


32 34;31,3 


24, 6; 68,23;87,3; 
89,34 

llni o^P foul MeSS 51,27 
fciril 43,6 

ursde>tv 5,7; 

26, 17; 45, 11 etc. 
Ag^tAt A 4? misev^ 4, 

33 
giSldwA U^^tK 5,32 

<o g <pift to*thv-m-Ur 4 1,9 


40,19 


42,18 


A^^^A^A aea^n 35, 
36; 3 8, 31; 40, 2 7 etc 

70, 13; 7 1,4 etc. 
li A 9 A<^(? higkt 42,27; 

64, l; 71*16 ett. 
t) A 9 ^ A &^)&Kumilit<j 33,15 
1iA9^A < c < Sff ricVics 5,18; 

56,25;57,30 32eU. 

A* A 9 g ^ A 9'gpnlj' TC.dknft$s 11, 

28; 16,31 ; 25, 15-6 

A AM AC ... ' 

* -~ ^J ^ A H* ^ ^ I A * L -^^ 

O A o |() A 3^" X^Uif iiTMd.C. Q , 

31;56,32;9i ,8 
1 A 9 ^> A g <Si (? cKarm, $|>-M 

3^,24 
ti A 9 ^ 5 ^^ 4TCnitj3 Q | 2 5 . 

77, 4; 79, 22 


tin 3d 90 


17,31 

48,25 
8, 13 
ton9^-gA6(? 9Yfet<\nes 7,3; 

8,34;27,30;28,2-3etc. 
aclultnes 77,29 
gau-ntHfcSS 27,26 

to o 9 j 6.0 u-aloY^u-ivtue 4,2- 
3 19-20;27,19 24&te 

ft 6 Aaxmfj* |u.t*\f nosVty 26 , 33 

68, 8 
86,4 
56,27 

*J s C'3^ ft osivick 63,7 
^hame 67,28 
31;68,5 
to toS 30*6^ urkiteness 7 , 7 J 

17,12|26,1 
tontoto^n biooa. 6,11 13 

Bio4-d30,24 25; 76, Sis 

tK.vsty 38,8-9;43, 1 
C"> 3 3 i 4 A urarwtK32 ,30 
g A nroT<S.,Log5 1,17; 

5,8;9> 18etc. 


v, o 


4,15; 


5,29;6,4 

to Ag -jj 4/3,-jj^A lowe 86,8; 

87,2 4 5 6 etc. 
to >ij l ^9^ de.^-tVv 17,11 18 

20 24eix. 

toAQ<R^3^ 42,9 26; 

49 ,20 etc. 


25,7; 

58,30;59,1 

to Aj 3 A4. KotrlotYy 5l,23j 

68, 17:<xirb.49t 18; 51, 
32ett, 

foYce 57,27 
4,30 


4, 12;25,34;31,9ett. 
to ^<gw 3 & A A Vvaste 

47,30 
toigA*T) A 8' joix-tV 84, 14; 

85,3 
tofttoi^-j^o joy 25,9.; 

38, 14;39>3etc. 
to^v 3 4A 90 9,33;33, 17; 

41, 8;91, 19 
to 83 6 AJL he.Y 15,11; 

75, 12;78, ltt. 
to 6 3 i}<^0 I * A disease 2 5 , 1 8 

31 

to9i?6to cf Ttro4.9 2 , 7 
to aj g ^> tountrj ,v n\ft-5.7 ,21; 

10,24 25 28etc. 
to 5 9 y *$oidute8 f 2; 14 , 24; 

1 9 > 2 tc. : to fi go*& 0< k 

^ g <ei urK^te CO^OY 6 1 , 6 i 

77,25 
to 0^3 6 da coVK v 93 

41,4 
59,31 
J 3 <^ 6 ft ^Ti^po's 49 i 2 

w9i^i 5-to-^acK 20> 

13; 65,24 
3 6 g i dJt re$t 28 , 5 


Sovil,btft0.tK,oder 12 , 20 J 

17,31 ; 23 , 5etc.: T$w n 

?9^4A. HeAy&Hast 32,34J 
34,9 21 etc. 

g ft animate. 59,31; 

60,20i 6 2, 9 etc. 


13;85,25 

U.- 79 2 10 
KhtgAanv 52 , 17 
1, 13; 6, 
28; 8, 4 11 14 etc. 
td *^o bv.de 20, 31; 25, 7; 

28,32etc, 

tKfPvixaKS.S 29; 13,313*. 
^ ? * 3^ * A t-<xtK 2 8 , 8 J 3 1 i 
34-32, l;39,25 

Q i * At^u&l^.UreigKtQ f 7 

A ecj-u-ai 35 , 

23-24 

V te ^ 9 A jtt 40,27 

9 *JL wv<u<. ^<ltoct<te ,22 
9 A A. .jfc 18, 5 7; 

49,10 
fc fc *) i A otKev 4 , 3 1 ; 5 , 1 4 ; 

6,21-2 25ett:1fcuA 
^* tsfe-g * AiH- Y enti , 2 8 ; 
27,28 j4l,2'6:1i*D * 
\t *1> 9 <o otKevurise 41,27 


i $ SVI'A, }>ft.w 4917; 
50,2;52, 12 

^j A/i g i A A, vaipish,Yend84 , 15 


M d 6 v 4 * A. tovtaycS 1 2 6 S 

\f ^p <Q ** ^* ^* ^^ y 

49,3l;50,9 10 14 
y * d *? ft t.-m\>1. 32,35; 

57,34; 61 ,29eU, 
y & A*b o 6 n tofiai, 5,34; 

7 10 11 13-14 24 
29;23,17 18 21 23 
3l;24,2;25, 11 21; 
26,7 


37, 12 


68,9i?l,4 

3 ff doire. 38,32; 

39,2 
03 *3H'cVe,$Kin. 17,28 

03 3-* ***. * Jl) 9 * A 

03 "8 9 s 3 * A capture 69 , 1 

2; 78,21;80, 1 
03 T) 39 ^ *A4ettiVe.82, 20 
03 TJ D 3 tti * A cUcet't 49, 

8 


^j i * 5 stvcct 
g i n^w 3 g i A A. 
38,33 


18,2 


59, 13 20; 62, 15etc. 

g I ^5 & witless 24,11; 

39,2 

^A^SoA. Aesevt 17,9; 

26,5;55,22 

ig i*A. SiiH^ftit<|42, 


27,31;62,15 


25 


72,9 10J73,15 
ga9n6n3gfcA.fi. V 

66,25;68,15 
ja>9 n 6A t|>ti<.nt 39,3 

T) A3D^ ba< * 31,16; 
35,9J50,10 


, 10;28, 10-llatc. 


12,34; 13,3 


47,16 

13 6 "8 <A 3 *>iovt.i 54,5 
T) 6D ^ <?a^ *A ufet 

37, 13 
1)6l) 68'Uv 1,25; 87, 

3 1 615 
g 9 3 Q A A o i 3 *oT*iitflj^ 7,31; 

94,3 


42,33 


30;83,8 

^S^n&iSft) A better 28 , 13 
g 6 <ow.n.tvusr*bi. 61,26 
t ofr*i 14, 32 

* Jti*Aijnt4 , 3 3 


61,26 

& 3 * A4iituTb,-M*l 7,31; 

26, 14;51,20 et^- 

^ 05 o (^ oo i 


26; 53, 12 
^^p^) *<ftw 3 A 5 n 
9,34 
<S> R g i 


, 12 


43,23;46,23 


17;46, 18 

D^?SJT)r ftwr< * eYlc " 61,11 
g ti ti g <i^> A )rictk$ 

43,20 

^o Kifirios 27,16 

Urd, master 1,7 9 

12; 3, 31 etc. 

68,3 
17,20 
32; 46, 25 e.tc. 


4,4 6; 5, 1 24 


31 , 19-20 22 etc. 

31,27 


3 g i AJ 
42,7 

D3 <?"3 6 3 * 3^ w ^*62 , 16 
TJ 6 A6ro.fi. iwcjk|. 17,32 
7)^3 r wA cK<|dkj5 55,9 
T) ' D 3 & 3 * ** urines* 86,6 

D ^ 38 D <?"* 38^* AUHrJjktou$$ 

51,28 31;52, lOeK. 
T) ' gjD^w-*-^^ 11 ** 011 * 68,5 
UOS^g***- s'H'' c '^7 4 , 1 

, 2 6 
69, 19 

T3 Jq^-JJ ^ g i *JZ.<rtKHeM2 1 , 1 7 


n urea* 27,16 
ftitrng 4931; 
50,2? 30 31 
f "g^wg^jo UYiHuCjKt 5,8 

f 3 3 fc AA irftUte 12, 11 ; 
23,56 etc.. 


i A.O. li 


y 8 * A 


, 21 ; 
51,12 


<g 4 & 4 , un certain 

ieev\ < K'o\.,c 1 feon 11,28 
<g 4 w 3 g i 4-fl. byeaolt1\ 

40, 15; 33,25 
<8 *j<C *v e H<*9 13, 32 
g 3^0 coUr^forvne , 12 13 

14 27; 7, 1 7 


17,22 
opoot.Ug 13,34; 

4Q,l;67,13 
<8 gOU vnilUt 20,2 

<g o^ AiSo tablet ,^kb 5,30 

30-1 ; 6,5;21, 15etc. 

10tl9 


77,5 


31,1 


oj 


83,32 

<8oA^^evy 9,6; 

81, 30;82, 5 
^glio^o onijyL-.nft.il g , 3 j 

20,3 28 29;21,2 7 


8 12;77,18 19 
78,34;79,4 568 
13 19bi*i80,10 14; 
86,5 19 

i *<~>*v By**\wi4.8 , 10; 

81,14 

4,12 


* $9 g i A -ft, ots , e%a 

2;71,16 

4^0*5 |> 

43,8 

*?*&8 i*-fl-^ v ^ tl 25, 7; 

35, 25; 39, 27 6f^- 

4 g S P %X*" r "*i> 16,36 

4^4 ^ citjj 1,4; 7, 
14 25 28 etc., 

J 4^1 i * 6 * A gA,boivtu9 9 , 5 


27,24;29> 12 

*r? Hr ft Ir?v 9' n - 37,24 

27;59,23 

19,30 

> 6; 67 , 7 

84, 8: ^ 3 i *- fl - 33* *- 

, 1 7 

85,18 
17,28 

3 AJL tftflne 7,16 17; 

8 ,31-2;9,5 i I 3>ti 

23 i 6 27 


3 * : 


23, 6; 43, 6 
63 , 7 


9 44% A $^> ou.se ,Kujbandl ?0,20 i 4 A V VJ *< co>n|laiit $1,4 

^ 36 44. AojYvxatce, t*.s ^4^4i <-><g 4 A c r ij out 

1, 19 28;5, 1 16ett. 95,5 

A U < 4 _ A M*P? 

*4 JL A *^ 3 P*5 v 

G ^u g t) q> A & 1t UrovtVy 1,17,5,16; 

90,25, bat Wv.06^\*j iv ^G <*. 11, 6&0i ft4 tf \)34 , 1 4fitt. 

* JT)^ * 3*3 6 <?* 3,22; ^ ^ ti 3 i 4 A urovtk 59,23 

6,19 27ctc. ^,9 8 A Ood 1,26;4,8 

w^^ ASg I 4A we^ 70, 25;23 , Sett,: ? 9 <1 

25 27 9 i <2l d cxjo f)0-ntftjHi5tf(nQ 2 , 

I^CD 4 o 4 A iv/be. 50,17 g 4 4 A K*owlt<i^eo|G'. 4 ,12 

2 1 ; 5 1 , 2 

4 i A ca.ire 14 , 16 

3 ^ i 5 3^>6 A dcf>itis 76,2 

^|)33*S4A \a.wL 7,14; ^9^oggi4A 6-oA 

9,15 21 2?6t*:33g- 27,2l6tt, 

g6nt 3p^1oc? farmer m^A4^4mA $Cov|ionl 9,12 

6l,l:^33 6n1 8pg- 13;59,34;60,14 

<ogi>4A fAv>y\i^g 61,22; <j> * $ ^ g <? rt clou.L 20,16 

62,7-8 ^>U 4^'^A fe.fc.ir 66,19 

i o PvQYvt b^lourl 7*14 W 5 o {"> A tiri H2. 14, 19; 

beUur 95,15 19 19,19;61,7 

ic-wxifcv 13, 34; 38 , 

12;40, 1 etc. 3 
y & n g o curt dour 3,34;4, 1 

32-3 34et<. 3 w 3 g^> o-Hirer^29 6etc. 

13 3 r> ( k Keitix^j>ri'e$t4 6,7 3< r >38^33'*l-i,25 *. 

(3 g 3 AA-turw 7 ,8; 20, 17; 3 
37,5 


87 1 Z 


rugkt 12,1; 35, 4 rj^vroK^^T^p 49,23 
55,21:?A<?*<?* e <?3- 15 17 22;3,34etc. 


ctWer4, 17; 39, 18 


:ipog * 3 - o.fUv 4, 17; 5 9 34; 

o> A o 5)1 aa A *oA<U<L'tKeirHe0<i$ 
61,28 

3<*3AAckfia, 46,11 15; 

50,26 
a -g A 3 ^,ft firev 14,15 4;72,15;73,8 

^gAeftgi*A lore 7 9 , 24 03^<?c9AA fo.U 

_ k , _ 5? <IL * a a <t 11 

aTlrofMOoftoAsft. ea\-w *\%S5 3 8 > '"*, 00,10 

\ r W vv 

26; 39 , l*t.. 
g-ji^p^wA co-\tn. 53,21; 

61,22 
33 6 J 6 SVO-VB 8, 13 


71, 


71, 15;79,3 7 9 

g >^ ij 3 A JL |tuv\<ie. 46,15 

g 6<&3 AA bm<i.,-He.74,3 5 


13, 13 


, 12 

A A Vxai t.n.76 , 33 

69,29 


Jtate 67,15 


17,26} 18, 12;20,31&c. 

A^AgiS^an id. 23, 

3l;36,35 

3 i <^? g i *A befoul 89,17 

, 4 

65 ,4 J 
83,12 

g3Sgi*.fl. b*|-ou) 22,29; 
31 , 15-16; 66, 27 etc. 

13,26 
38,1 

5020j 


21 ? 22;22, 12 15 etc, 
g 9 ^wi ,&.44orn4 , 6 ; 14 , 
12J35,35;77, 11 


io>v 30 , 6 * 
^ g 9<og3 ^ftev 30,6: 
36,10 etc.; 3 g 9 ^g 9 A < 


36,20 22 


67,31*73,6 14 

g9^AJS. e^tr76, 22 

3 9^8 A 3^1 g i-g^A ^ liKe. 

4,25; 19,26? etc. 

67, 19 
74 , 28 

3 6g &4JL fcu.'fd. 64,3 17 

g 3 g > J> a A sei'ze 76, 

6 28 

0^*0^3*^ Cflu ^ 54,30; 

72,l;73,16: 8U- 


neglect, cUsh'se. 25, 1-2; 

31,27 32 etc. 
30603*-a-ttx 13,31; 

39,23 26;43,4 
3g3 A A join. 13,31 

39,23 26;43,4 
3 3 00344. jat\\,(.ot*H- 

9,31; 12,32; 13, 2 etc. 

,15 

29,9; 
59, 17; 75, 7 etc. 
3 W-g^n entorti 48,1 
3 g )i TJ 4 * A vubupMifxL 9,10 


15 


18,29;24,24 

017) 9 AA driviK 83,13 

20 


39, 14; 5 1,21 etc. 
3 g J 9 4 A create. 1,21 

27; 36, 22; 55, 23 etc, 
* 8*3 *3 * A d ye. 36,20; 

72,28 
3 gip'D 3 

8,32 


48,3;52,29;76, 

"3 33 wg * A ex.|je 
5;54,5;71,23 

"3 g a> 9 A Adxeitre4 2,12 
27; 82, 23 etc.. 


83, 8; 93, 25; 94, 23&<, 
08 < *<?3** %a ' $l ' vx - 22, 
14 22; 23, 6 8 9 
g 1* d 6 


<4. be 

7 27;20, 10-lletc. 
to d^g & 0<*in tosbie. 

4,8-9 30; 17, 16et* 
g J ^ 3 * AYnove,^.u.ttKe7 6 , 1 


51,1 12;85,4 
g^036*AVe(t> 37,1 
g ^ n <ft 3 4 A acv(f vce. 24, 
29S 58, 7 9 :3 3 ti4-. 
430 off Ynv$46, 6 
34^ burtv 32,30; 
49, 16; 50, 2 8 
fl?3 A ^ g i 4 A 

18 

g ? 3 6 A g & 4 A 

55,31; 79,33;86,31 

g \> g i 4 A toti,h 31,5; 

68,20 23 

0J484A ea,t a^, 17,35; 

18,6 7;71,32 


5, 15; 29, 
23;49,10 

3 30^1 g^ (>roVi^tc 5.5, 

10,23 

34gJ(ogi4 Aca$tU4 7,28} 

52,35 
3 oo 4ig ^ A A |>ifct4w^80 v 28 


86,22 
3o946oj 

32 

3 CD A3 O 

53,16 


Sink 


^B A ^^ 3 A A <} o Aourn-1 7 , 1 2; 

53,8 10 eU. 16,12;86,18 

3AWT)^i4stemd53, 19; S^oSnirg 68,4 5; 78, 

^ 8, 9,13; 17,26;72, 1: 

O^&Ot) ^J^A>ft. 

M6 

,24 32 3 

12,12 ^3 
14,31 26,25 

^r>6i 3 >0n oM.lwo.YtVv ^ 3 ? ft ^".w 41,2 3 J 4 2 , 

11,24;14,10 10 

9n6A^A6 urithiw 17,3 ^ 35 *-^- j uA 9 e 4 8, 32; 66, 


33;79,9 

A* 5 <J> 


, 10-1 


15,5;17, 29;78,16 
3 25 etc-: aswe.rb30, 34 ^T)r lawr 13, 33; 31 


* A 

86,31 
ci o I A bi vH S be.v 16,27, 

29; 36, 7ebt.:?oi**A 

(r-KC9i 10,2 
<5 <Sl 3 A be distftntl 1,14; 

96, 11 


34; 32, 


3 


A htare dL^t^tS 9 , 6 


, 10; 


21,22;27,18 


") * 6 g * A 

27 i 19 

y*b3 Stacte 79,4 
D i^freKe<vd7 , 30; 24 , 
3 32:26,5 10 12*t*. 
-g 3 AA-tu.sK, f-n^ 59 , 13 ; 
63,6 

T)3 6ft 3* n bcwtt/f-/7 ,18; 
B, 25; 13, 27 


50,15 
B 

38, 12 


ft 6 40 A | Rdti l)e.v, seem 

11,32; 12,5;15,33 
^nJL, KoT-tt\ 17,6; 

44,5;93,29 

6 g i *& irif/en: <x(>)ca>> 


3 * 


,24 


18,29-30; 19, 13et t 


(3 


38, 25 


24,7-8 
28; 25, 5 17 etc, 

10,29 


V 

Q AA Hecure.*. 13,1; 32, 0*3*6 
13J34, lett.: t> 6 r>. 8 29 
Up g G Corners of heairett oucov/ttvti fe O & g i 

41, 15; 64, ISetc.s 0*) 
6 Augfc obsi'<i(a.-w96 , 2 : 
0oti 1 fc g "g q> o Ke.atf*xl<jtoAj 

13,34-14,1 d 

&f^>AA 90 Ore.*. 9 8,13 

0g9AAexkala 17,31 d A^ favtc. 4,22;5,26) 

0g9AA 5tr.*Ke 37,12 6,18 27 etc. 

g0fe^><>f fve 6, 10; 11, d Aift(j) 3 A 5 irei*^ 57,11 

27; 12 , 23etc-: 0g0^<^^ dA^m^ireiw 15,26 28 


3 


61,5 29 32;20,4 

11,1; dAdAA 


80,27 


15, 16; 56, 10 etc. d 

ow^AAarr 46,21; 

52,6 

nfe# castle 65,14 d 

Bft&AA KYtOHT 24,13; dft 

35, 18 etc.. 

wj*3 AA SIK 26,3 14; 

28,10 19 30 etc, 

0<o6 A A Knour 12,9; 

18, 28; 82, 9 etc. 

O^>A wife 24, 33; 49, 

10; 67, 17 18tt. 

82, 12 17 25 


etc. : d oli 0n<n>A 

in-ta.w 68, 10 17 

urood. 52,33 

>A 5eek35 ,36 ; 68 , 5 
slee^ 48,13 14 
0*0 root 14,19:19, 
23; 20,20 etc. 

3 AA iovi^u<.r 66,26; 

67, 19;68,9 

gg ^ A A (oaurev 26 , 
17;34,24;43, 10 etc. 

n powerful 61, 17; 
74, 9 etc. 

trft.n.fvuitUss 64 , 26 d 8 AA bvtKev22 ,23 24 ; 
20,24 30,7 2 6 etc. 

44, 


g i AA anoint 6,23 


30,29- 20;55,12 


30i67,24 
o 3 6 <j> i * 


9,22 32;13,9-10 


22 ,27; 23, ll;34,7&t. 12 13; 16, 29; 19, 31; 


20.1 2 10i30,19; 
36,10 13 22;62,20; 

63.2 18;64,21;65, 
23 27 30 34:<U?a- 

49,26; 62,22 
d <ft^^A A irr^mb/e 51,26 
J-g A^nbone84 , 15 ; 85 ,20 
J^jj^o old. 32,8 ;47, 

13;56,5 lletc 

5 A errt 38,16 

J Sift 7,27; 

24, 29; 58, 20 etc. 


83,21 
*dj)&4.ft. uritness,n\ 

9, 18; 34, 3; 35, 25 etc 
A 36*3 5 AA volt u> IB, 

19 23 

4&4ogng& *JL \v\trod me. 

29,20;46, 18;66,33 

* ^ 3<c^ A GO i * A ?eti<l outs 2 , 
ll;90,20;91,4 

* (ft 6 o b 3 A A. vecid. 48, 

;89, 19 


30,8; 70,6;81,33 
* ft 8 A ^OP ke*fK.nl 1,21; 
17,4;42,33et<.i-? *<^- 
3 ^ w J> A A. hao.tU.ndow5 9 , 
18 

V *^3^gi*A tteiire- 68, 10 

31 ^ 


19;59,13 

A $ > ^i 3 A ^t 

21 

* ^ 902 'S 3 6 3 * -ft- 

74,8 


18, ll;37,8;38,6etc, 


59,19!83,35 


38,33 

A 3 


1,12 


11, 14-15 
*6ti<r 3 

92,11 


, 26; 
isK 42 , 


30;71,33 


9,10;78,30 32 


12; 
d fe 


29; 

05 ** 
0** 
13, 
3 1> 
65, 
g^" 
28, 


66,22;67,32 

) 9 d ji. veyv\ oweg 3,16 

68,29 

49, 7; 58, 28 
75, 14 bis 

80,21 
4,15 24; 
33etc. 

ovdor, rule 62 , 24 ; 
25; 66,23 etc. 
3^9^AA due Q Yclev 
7;50,22; 70, 27 
bt;,oHA40, 26; 44, 2; 

20, 


98> 


26 
y 03 6 n boo*, letter 4,15; 

9,18; 12, 29 etc. 
O<AA yart 9, 3; 26 , 2 
oD0<><> re.cL 14 i 14; 16, 
4-5;20,29 

o^ Jo.Yt , share. 3 6 i 15 i 

43,33; 80,26 etc. 

03 3 fc * A Ao-rYun*te34 , 2 1 

9$AA t>Mre,W5)i9, 22; 

20, 17 19! 21, 11 etc. 
6 A before 75,27 

O f> * <?*(}!} 3 AA ClYttt^n- 

cise 96,1 

oSA^oi^-JjaD 0^0 i A A Civ- 


71,10 17 

(j "Jj g CD 0(*r>g i A A aixci 
cised 32,23;64, 19; 

71,11 

o 6 A 9 g <g o i 4 A reigh before 

78,12 


49,24 2&;51,30 


30,8 

0646 ^og^ofovmev 9 , 25 ; 

70,20 23; 92, 5 ctt, 

06 44.V? ^bcjore 44, 19 

22;45,23 


* JL 

E d 


tttow. 16 , 17 


1,27-8; 42, 17 


29: 


35, 20; 51, 
19;52, 


| 3V o|,He-t 3, 31; 5, 15; 
23,4 etc. 


16,18 


f 


6 A A% y^^^So^AA be 
aurouYe bef<*Vi.h(il 1 , 24*5 
6*3 3 bef<.Y 30,35;31, 
2;34,10 

^gi*A call 15,19; 

46, 4; 54, 32 etc. 

*A3 *A Kaitew 5, 25; 93, 
14 


28,13 27 

TJ 3 AA bu.r*t 52,34 

^OSAA te.cK 31,34; 
93,1 
g<atiJ3 16,5; 

54,19 

JYv 5, 13; 19,30 
5, 13; 7, 3 3 
14, 14 etc,: ?g A^> 0*8 f- 

tl A Uravm urout^v QcoYy^l^io^ 
ofiovTo^j 41,28-9 

AA WxeYy 71,11 


3 3 i AA k.9nx. 4,26;5, 
21 26 

2 3 3 AACUTJ^ , o.v\o.tKei*\atift 

61,24;66, 19;73, 12 
etc. 


6,22 23-4; 22, 2 let:. 

)^ cr0u*d 19,11 

13 

ij 66,20 


84,29; 
85, 12 

kect 6,28 
1,5,11,11 
food. 84, 11 1? 
8*9 AA e*t 8, 13,31, 

21 23 

9 A^nyg & AA-tya.th 

1, 18;28,27;33, 13 etc. 
a39A6oytriu. l,26i 
15,12;28,3 
<&33 & *A oy)?Y.s* 34,6 
(ressel,jo.v 80,12, 
85,10 


1 2i25,19 26 


82,24; 
83,16 23;90,26 
& I A A o,tmoiiLiiee 5 5 , 2 

tt 38,7 
8,7 

85,22;86,5 
18,4 5- 
6 7 


6,10 15;7,12 17etc. 


85,15 
k ^t9 >A &l<ot 41 , 23 ; 

43,33;61,31;62,26 
lT ,>fur a 13,33; 18,43 

fttc ibl)CD AflOitlA 


,4 -5 1 


<3 CD A OB 4 3 o 
91,31 


4 6, 7; 84, 


33 


17,10 24 
3<"<og i AA invest 72 ,8 

a^ I\^(jk24 , 26 ; 37,18; 

58.5 23 etc.; 3 &?<* 

^ 3 3 <8 * A atten>t 5 , 2 3 - 

4;87,22:^ fl^ 8 ?** 4 ? 3- 
& A >w*v f \nt0kt 23,3; 

32, 19ett.:& s^ 9 ? 0< 8 6 ' 

Hx*)Uttj one. 21, i; 57 ft 

1 etc. :^ j^3^*lAA t te 

by the Uul 8 2, 10 14 
9 4 A woM 28, 18; 76, 7; 

65,8 
40,23 
28,29; 
43, 12e^;cf *^ie 6 * A 
3 o*0 fU5H 17, 29; 25, 

85.6 etc. 


6 

31 32 ; 26 , letc. y^yo^ gwoMeJI.HodetSS ,20 
Om0Ag<*AC A,Yn a I 1,19; 3 1 ; 4 8 , 8 e"tc 

26, 10J30, 17; 70,31 3^*<*A W 5j 25,8;35,35; 
j 1i 6 O^A velief 6,29 53, 24 etc.. : ^-g *<5t 
\i 44. l6*fc ,free. 30,26; *@T) ^ d ^ * A cvuci fy 24, 

31,25;37,16 28;63,32etc. 

j ^ g % * A loa-fr ( j n t <-xt evron' ^-g ^^><g 9-j)^ocwell 1,16; 

Coajiy iHOC"* 00 *) 40, 20,4 6; 64,23; 89 ,27 
31; 41, 2 
3 Tl 9 ^ 3 * A ttM**K,risil 18,4 I 


A 3 A >elovt 51 , 13 
steed 37,12 

38T> ctta<m 13,26 

butt 39,2; 3; 

89,27 

82,16 I O/ 61,28 

*** , - 

IT ear 9 


). 1 5 , 1 W^A^AIIA C-'0}f> 

16,27 TJJ 

26,21 ^ 

28,5 T)t |1 8a 6 3**a* fo^t-Uj.]) B-g g 6g 

37,9 v*ogi1A FTt. Us-? * * ^ * 

39, 12 )>t 98 4* fort. 


40,26-27 

A O Am * G 


40,31;41,2 

46,23 ^ftyoroowjgonuA ^VQ t>>ic.9*D^V D * " 3 3 "* 

int,o 

49,30 0AWA g^A\i 

53 , 2' 3 A tp u A o Apx^ro $pt 9t> o 

57,16 ft. 
59,2 


rm|>. * leg 

60*11 <ort^pco 

62 i 14 J>t 3 
o * 6 , 9c)tt 9 


3 g a> * -goo n ? 3 3 no 
67,27 9 
70>2 6 
70,17 g 
77,10 ^ 


86,21 

87,5 * 9 J a(j 6 A 3 g i 6 A 93 (} 3 A 6 9 i 6 

95,14 *y * V AOJ *1i 

95,27 


White-Smith M.ECo.,Pre8s,Boston,U.S.A. 


STUDIES AND DOCUMENTS 


A {ready published : 

I. EXCERPTA EX THEODOTO OF CLEMENT OF ALEXANDRIA 

By Robert Pierce Casey 

II. EPIPHANIUS DE GEMMIS 

By Robert P. Blake and H. De Vis 


Volumes in the Press : 

III. THE DURA FRAGMENT OF THE GREEK DIATESSARON 

OF TATIAN By Carl H. Kraeling 

IV. THE Visio PAULI : The Latin TracWion of the Text 

from unpublished Mss. 

By H. T. Silverstein 


Volumes in Preparation : 

FAMILY II AND CODEX ALEXANDRINUS 

By Silva Lake 

THE ARMENIAN VERSION OF THE SERMO MAIOR OF 
ATHANASIUS By Robert Pierce Casey 

THE CAESAREAN TEXT OF THE GOSPEL OF MARK 

By K. Lake, R. P. Blake and Silva Lake 


UNIVERS TY OF CHICAGO 


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